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Robert P. Davis  
Gadshill  
(401) 273-9450  

gadshill@usa.net  







Americana
As America struggled through the 19th century to codify its principles and the democratic foundation of its society, there appeared a rich body of work in political and social thought. This work was expressed in the literature of the period, the public documents, narratives, biographies of both public leaders and common men, in formal writings and in the ephemera of the robust and exuberant society. Here we present a sampling of our holdings in this area.

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6252
Anonymous.- The Nebraska Question Comprising Speeches in the United States Senate by Mr. Douglas, Mr. Chase, Mr. Smith, Mr. Everett, Mr. Wade, Mr. Badger, Mr. Seward, and Mr. Sumner. Together with the History of the Missouri Compromise. Daniel Webster's Memorial in regard to It - History of the Annexation of Texas - the Organization of Oregon Territory - and the Compromises of 1850. New York. J. S. Redfield. 1854. First Edition. 119 pp. 8vo. Sabin 52200. LCP 7004. The Missouri Compromise set some limitation on the extension of slavery. By 1854, however, there was pressure to repeal it. The proposal, then, for the organization of the Nebraska and Kansas territories reopened the deep divisions on this subject. The admission of Missouri, the annexation of Texas, the 1850 compromise and the Nebraska-Kansas Bills bore heavily on the controvereial issues of Indian treaties, the extension of slavery as well as the organization of Nebraska and Kansas. This volume reviews this history and records in detail the contemporary speeches in Congress on the issues. It reprints Daniel Webster's 1819 pamphlet on the Missouri Compromise, not included in his Collected Works. From here on was the course of the break-up of the American Union. Signed by owner, M. W. Tappan (twice on cover, once, each, on title page and on p.9). Modest foxing of preliminary pages. Edges of covers worn and chipped without loss of text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

6604
Field, Kate.- Hap-Hazard. Boston. James R. Osgood and Company. 1873. Decorative cartouches at beginnings and ends of sections as well as decorative initials for each chapter. A single line illustration. First Edition. 253 pp. 12mo. Kate Field, an American writer, devotee of Charles Dickens, author of "Pen Photographs of Charles Dickens's Readings. Taken from Life" based on Dickens' readings in America in 1868, traveled extensively in America and Europe. She wrote much for "Every Saturday", The New York Tribune, etc. , and some of these journalistic efforts comprise this volume. In it she reveals her anti-slavery position (despite an element of "Gentlemen's Agreement" bigotry toward Blacks), her stand for women's rights, her affection for Charles Dickens , a strong sense of the American personality and an acute awareness of differences between 19th century Americans and Europeans, particularly the French and British. The book is dedicated to " all young women in search of careers or titled husbands." Minor wear at ends of spineand corners. A Very Good to Near Fine copy of a scarce item.
Price: $150.00

6773
Houghton, Eliza P. Donner.- The Expedition of the Donner Party and Its Tragic Fate. Glendale, CA. The Arthur H. Clark Co.(Grafton Publishing Co). 1920. Portraits of author & her husband as frontispieces. Illustrated. First Edition. 375 pp. 8vo. Donald L. Hardesty, The Archaeology of the Donner Party, University of Nevada Press ( Review in AB, 11/3/97). An Insider's View of the Donner Party. Grafton Publishing Corporation Cancelled by Overlay Label of Arthur Clark Company. Illustrated. Author Was in the Donner Party as a Child under Her Father's Leadership. Ex Libris. Library Bookplate on Front Pastedown. Other slips and spine label as expected. Hinges cracking internally.Wear at ends of spine and corners.. Foredge untrimmed. Corner of pp. 343/4 torn with small loss of text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $85.00

6901
Lossing, Benson J.- The Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution; or, Illustrations by Pen and Pencil, of the History, Biography, Scenery, Relics, and Traditions of the War for Independence. With Eleven Hundred Engravings on Wood, by Lossing and Barritt. Chiefly from Original Sketches by the Author. New York. Harper Brothers. 1850-1855 Printed and engraved titles, the latter drawn by S. Wailin, engraved by Lossing and Barritt. Engravings in text, as noted. Engraved frontispiece of the signers in Volume 2. ?Second Edition. 783, 772 pp. 4to Howes L-477. Sabin 42129. Groce & Wallace (for Wallin). Lossing's famous illustrated history of the American Revolution. A lovely set, probably a later issue. Sabin values the books for their information, not to be found elsewhere, making this work "a cyclopedia of the American Revolution." 9Lossing was an author, editor and engraver, prolific in his output. Samuel Wallin was an engraver and draftsman active in New York , 1838-51. He exhibited at the National Academy. Gilt very bright. Minimal wear along edges and corners. Lacks frontispiece in Volume 1. Front hinge starting internally. Owner's bookplate on front pastedown of both volumes. Else, Very Good.
Price: $295.00

7063
Ramsay, David.- History of South Carolina, from Its First Settlement in 1670 to the Year 1808. Complete in One Volume. Two Volumes Bound in One Volume. Newberry, SC. W. J. Duffie. 1858. Reprinted from 1809 Edition. viii, 274, 307 pp. 8vo. Howes R34 (Howes III, R33). Evans 22090. Ex Libris. Two Maps. One Volume reissue of the two-volume original published in 1785. Evans notes that Ramsay petitioned Congress on April 15, 1789 for copyright protection on his two works, this volume and his proposed "History of the American Revolution." Congress granted his request on April 20, 1789. These were the first copyrights issued by the American government and antedate by more than a year the passage of a general copyright law, which became effective on June 1, 1790. Ramsay, a physician, was notoriously independent minded and was once caned on the streets of Charleston. Perforated title page with small chip missing at margin. Modest library labels.and markings. Wear to edges of spine and boards. Else a very good and tight copy without foxing or browning.
Price: $300.00

7099
Sanborn, F[ranklin] B[enjamin] (Editor).- The Life and Letters of John Brown, Liberator of Kansas, and Martyr of Virginia. Boston. Roberts Brothers. 1885. Frontispiece portrait of Brown. Other portraits and illustrations as well as facsimiles of letters from Brown. First Edition. 645 pp. 8vo. LCP/HSP Afro-Americana #9086 (only English edition listed). DAB (for Sanborn) A biography of Brown by his friend and supporter, a New England abolitionist. Sanborn (1831-1917) was closely acquainted with Emerson, living in Concord and running a school there. He met John Brown in Boston in 1857, and, captivated by him, became his New England agent. He failed to dissuade Brown from the raid at Harpers Ferry, but aided him. The US Senate ordered Sanborn's arrest. Twice he ran to Canada, but was arrested in Concord. The arresting party was chased out of town by a posse. Massachusetts Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw (father-in-law of Herman Melville and presiding judge at the infamous trial of Professor John W. Webster for the murder of Dr. George Parkman at the Harvard Medical School in 1850) ordered his discharge. Sanborn turned to newspaper work, public supervision of charities and writing, chiefly on Brown and the Concord luminaries, Emerson, Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, et al. "He never lost his passion for liberty and justice" (DAB). Slight soiling of cover. Slight wear at ends of spine. Owner's library stamp on title page. Small marginal water mark on front end paper, front end of text block and frontispiece page. Front hinge barely starting internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $310.00

7157
Spear, Charles.- Essays on the Punishment of Death (Capital Punishment). Boston. Charles Spear. 1844. Stipple engraving frontispiece by W. Thorp, engraved by Bouvé and Sharp. Seventh Edition(So Stated; Same Year as First Publication). 237 pp. + 14 pp. Ads, etc. 6to. Sabin 89066. An important 19th Century view of capital punishment. Known to be in the library of Thomas Wilson Dorr while he was imprisoned for leading the armed "Dorr Rebellion" in Rhode Island in favor of popular voting rights not tied to property ownership. Includes among Appendices a compendium of capital çrimes in the United States and the several ßtates. ßtated Seventh Edition. Was there, in this case, inflation of the number of Editions declared , a common 19th Century publishing practice used to foster the notion of a Best Seller? Spear (1803- 1863) wrote critically of capital punishment, which he thought was a vengeful usurpation of divine power. In 1845 he was appointed General Secretary of the Massachusetts Society for the Abolition of Capital Punishment. Minimal wear at ends of spine. Foxing of frontispiece, chiefly in margin. Else, Very Good.
Price: $165.00

7929
[Curtis, George William] (pseud.: Paul Potiphar).- The Potiphar Papers (Reprinted from "Putnam's Monthly."). New York. G. P. Putnam and Company 1854. First Edition. Sixth Thousand. 251 pp. 12mo. Cushing, p. 238,400. Haynes, p. 78. Stonehill. Bartlett, Bibliography of Rhode Island. Wright 2, 676. BAL 4267. Curtis (b. 1824) was an American journalist, after 1857 editor of "Harper's Weekly." He was born in Providence, RI, whence, at age 15, he moved to New York. At 18 he joined Brook Farm for 18 months with his elder brother, then taking up farming in Concord. in 1846 he left for a tour of Europe, before working on the New York "Tribune" until joining Harper's. Curtis is cited by Bartlett for an address in rhyme on the Sons of Rhode Island delivered at the New York Historical Society in 1863. Shaken. Cover faded and worn. Small marginal stains. Else, Good.
Price: $55.00

8279
Frieze, Jacob.- A Concise History, of the Efforts to Obtain an Extension of Suffrage in Rhode Island; from the Year 1811 to 1842. Providence. Benjamin F . Moore. 1842. First Edition. 171 pp. 12mo. Bartlett, p. 129. Heard & Hamsa, Bookman's Guide to Americana (9th Ed.),p. 160. Park, RI Biblio., #363.Gettleman, "The Dorr Rebellion." Sabin 25966. Jacob Frieze was an anti-Dorr pamphleteer, who had, in fact, voted for the People's Constitution in December, 1841, under the impression that it was an opinion without binding force. This volume is accepted as the standard Law & Order accountof the Dorr Rebellion. Foxed. Wear to Head and Tail and Edges of Spine and to Corners.Front Cover Stain.Else, Very Good. 250.00 8279
Price: $250.00

10192
O'Connell, Daniel, and Chase, S[almon] P[ortland].- [Pamphlet}. Liberty or Slavery? Letter of Daniel O'Connell on American Slavery. Letter of Hon. S. P. Chase in Reply to Daniel O'Connell. Cincinnati, OH. (The Catholic Telegraph ) Chronicle Print. 1863. First Edition in 15 pp. 8vo. LCP/HSP Afro-Americana #7263. In 1843, the great Irish patriot and leader, Daniel O'Connell, addressed a letter "to a Committee of the Cincinnati Irish Repeal Association, who had rebuked him for his Anti-Slavery opinions....This bold....protest of the great Irish Orator against the cruel injustice of American Slavery" remained unanswered by the Cincinnati group. However, Salmon P. Chase, later Secretary of the Treasury to Lincoln, was entrusted by a group of Irish Americans in Cincinnati to provide a reply, addressed to the Loyal National Repeal Association. Chase reviewed the history of slavery in America and calls for its abolition in ringing terms. He also calls for a repeal of the subjugation of the Irish by the British government. These two Irish and Irish-American appeals for the abolition of slavery were published by the Cincinnati Catholic Telegraph in 1863, 20 years after their original writing. Chase fell out with Lincoln and later had Presidential aspirations. But he was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by Lincoln and served through Reconstruction and the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. Signature on front cover by I. / [?J.] A. Graham and (?) by S.P. Chase. Inscribed on p.1, possibly by Chase,: "1864, July 22. Gift of C. Sumner. (Class of 1830)." Sumner, a brilliant lawyer, a graduate of Harvard College (1830), and later famously a Senator from Massachusetts and the great orator of the anti-slavery movement, apparently owned this copy Chips from edges of covers without encroaching on text or image. Removed. Else, Very Good.
Price: $285.00

10246
Elizabeth, Charlotte.- The Wrongs of Woman. The Little Pin-Headers. New York. John S. Taylor & Co. 1844. First Edition. 115 pp. + 8 pp. publisher's ads. 12mo. A spirited exhortation against child labor. Has a coterie of cruel overseers, pitiful and malnourished children, Irish orphans, money grubbing factory owners, etc. A church tract decrying the evil side of the industrial revolution. Wear at ends of spine and corners. Lacks front and rear free end papers. Foxing. Short closed tear at foot of pp. 35/36. Else, Very Good.
Price: $90.00

10256
[Temperance Broadside].- Certificate of Membership in Connecticut Cold Water Army. New Haven.87878 Hitchcock & Stafford, Printers. 1842. Illustrated with a woodcut, unsigned. 1p. 7 1/2" x 9 3/4". A temperance broadside certifying that H. Russell Cosby had taken the Cold Water Pledge, which is printed on the certificate. Cosby's name is neatly inscribed on the certificate in blue ink, while the signatures of Th. S. Williams, President of the Connecticut Temperance Society, Chas. J. Warren, the Secretary and the countersignature of Saml. Mallett, Leader of the Bridgeport Division, are printed on the form, which bears the printed date of July 4th, 1842. The Cold Water Army Pledge, composed of short verses, each line of which is a biblical quotation (with references provided below in print). The image shows a parade of children past a drunkard and skeleton and bearing signs proclaiming "No Alcohol" and "Cold Water Army." The leader offers the drunkard a pen and a scroll calling for "Total Abstinence" for his signature. At top is an eagle bearing ribbons in his mouth inscribed with the praises of water and a shield with a Latin motto. All are surrounded by an elaborate decorative printed border. A grand production. The forerunner of The Connecticut Temperance Society, the first in America, was established in 1789, largely stimulated by Dr. Benjamin Rush's diatribe against alcohol excess 5 years earlier. Yale has a copy in its Temperance Collection (Box 1, Folder 3). Very Good +.
Price: $550.00

10264
Swift, H.- [Sheet Music] Uncle Tom. Song and Chorus. Subject from Uncle Tom's Cabin. Dedicated to W. H. J. New York. W. Hill. 1852. First Edition. 5 pp. Fo. A lament of the slaves at the selling and removal of Uncle Tom. The chastising of the Massa for sending Tom away in the face of the loyalty of his entire retinue of slaves. Soiling of Covers. Title page reinforced at hinge. Chips from foot at hinge. Browning of page edges. Two small closed tears at leading edge of pp.3/4. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

10267
Wayland, Francis.- A Discourse Delivered at the Opening of The Providence Athenaeum. July 11, 1838. Published at the Request of the Directors of the Athenaeum. Providence. Knowles, Vose & Company. 1838. First Edition 37 pp. 8vo. Rev. Francis Wayland, President of Brown University, delivered this stirring address at the opening of one of our nation's oldest libraies, The Providence Athenaeum. It was a subscription library and had 300 subscribers. Wayland spoke of the development, through such institutions, of the intellectual, moral, scientific and economic capacity of a society. He thought that the religious aspects of humankind were well taken care of by other social institutions and was not the concern of the library. The library had the capacity, if used properly, to expand the attainments of all individuals, enhancing their knowledge and power. He urged the directors to expand the openness of their institution to thousands, so that Providence could be a beacon to the entire society of America. Minimal foxing of cover. Minimal browning of edges. Else, Very Good.
Price: $100.00

10281
Work, Henry Clay.- [Sheet Music}. Ring the Bell, Watchman. Song and Chorus. Chicago. Root & Cady. 1865. First Edition. 2 pp. Fo. Fuld, World Famous Music, p.349. A pre-fire Chicago musical imprint by Root & Cady. The words and music are by the illustrious composer of "Marching through Georgia" and other war songs and of temperance songs, Henry C. Work, possibly in celebration of full Black emancipation and the end of the Civil War. According to Fuld, "Marching through Georgia" was the most hated song in the South. Work (1832-84) was trained as a printer. Born in Connecticut, he moved to Illinois at age 3, as his father, an ardent abolitionist, was working for the Underground Railway. Henry C. Work, still a printer and later an inventor of toys and machines, offered a song to George Root, who encouraged him to write music full-time and published many of his songs. On rear cover is a gloriously illustrated publisher's ad. Not in American Imprints Inventory No. 4, Checklist of Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints, 1851-1871. Repaired transverse tear across pp. 1/2 not encroaching on text.Dampstain along leading edges. Hinge separated. Else, Good
Price: $1,440.00

10282
[Pitman, John].- [Pamphlet]. To the Members of the General Assembly of Rhode-Island. N.P. [Providence]. N.Pub.[Knowles & Vose]. N.D. [1842] First Edition. 24 pp. 8vo. Bartlett, pp. 83, 102, 205. M. E. Gettleman, The Dorr Rebellion, A Study in American Radic alism, 1833-1849, Random House, 1973.(especially pp. 57-58 and 73-74. Mowry, Dorr War, p. 28. NUC and Sabin attribute this anonymous pamphlet to Pitman. Not in American Imprints. Sabin 63054. One of the critical pamphlets relating to the Dorr Rebellion in Rhode Island, a central issue of which was the limitation of the Suffrage to property owners in a changing society at the spearhead of the Industrial Revolution. Pitman was a prominent Federal District Judge, whose correspondence with Justice Story and addresses to the people of Rhode Island as well as this one to the General Assembly, laid out some of the issues of the Dorr Rebellion and the conservative point of view. Originally a supporter of the extension of suffrage, Pitman changed his mind after the People's Convention of 1841 and the election of a new government, which he felt lacked authority. In opposing free suffrage, Pitman appeals to the Founding Fathers, especially Washington, to States' Rights (especially for Rhode Island, which still operated upon its old pre-Revolution charter without ever having written a new constitution), and to xenophobia, lest a Federal immigration policy overwhelm the State. He attacks Orestes Brownson (mistaking his name in the process), a Massachusetts reformer, who, although hardly involved in the Rhode Island problem, was a convenient target for Pitman's wrath. Browning of pages. Water stains. Chip from tail of leaf 1/2, without encroaching on text. Last leaf detached. Good.
Price: $350.00

10292
Damrell & Moore, and, George Coolidge.- Boston Almanac for the Year 1856. No. XXI. Boston. John P. Jewett & Co. 1856. Numerous illustrated ads, some printed in gilt on red paper.. Folding map of Boston in front. First Edition. 240 pp. + ads. 16mo. A wonderfully informative almanac for Boston for 1856. Contains latest US Census, lists of Federal and state officers, the usual occupations, societies, organizations, omnibus stops, libraries etc. Covers fading. Few wormholes in front hinge. Map and all else Very Good +.
Price: $85.00

10299
Mitchell, S[amuel] Augustus.- An Accompaniment to Mitchell's Reference and Distance Map of the United States; Containing an Index of the Various Counties, Districts, Parishes, Townships, Towns, &c. together with an Index of the Rivers; by Which Any County, District, Township, &c., or River, May Be Found on the Map, without Difficulty; Also. an Accurate Synopsis of the Population of the Union, according to the Census of 1840, Alphabetically Arranged; besides Statements of the Aggregate Amount of the Different Classes of the Inhabitants and Their Pusuits, the Value of the Produce of the Mines, Agriculture, Manufactures and Commerce, Lists of the Universities and Colleges, Canals, Railroads, &c. Philadelphia. S. Augustus Mitchell. 1844. Third Edition (First Edition Based on 1840 Census). 208 pp. Tall 12mo. Howes M684. Sabin 49715. A series of helpful tables and charts, based on the decennial census of 1840. The volume, first published in 1834, was an accessory to Mitchell's map of America. This issue missed by Sabin. Wear at ends of spine, corners and edges. Mild foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $195.00

10305
Thomas, Henry J.- The Wrong Man. A Tale of the Early Settlements. New York. Beadle and Company. 1862. Illustrated title page. First Edition. 119 pp. 16mo. Johannsen, Beadle & Adams, II, pp. 268-72; III, pp. 8-9. A mid-19th century novel published by Beadle and Company. It is set among the early settlements in the Ohio Valley. There is engagement between settlers, hunters, pack-peddlers, etc. A Black character, Cato, is depicted on the cover frightened and fleeing an exploding blockhouse. This explosion was to confuse the identity of a dead man in order to help Cato's master escape with his bride. The dating is assured by the publisher's address, for Beadle moved from 141 William St. to 118 William St. between 9/19 and 10/1/ 1862. It is unclear whether the name Henry J. Thomas was a pseudonym for Colin Barker, Edward S. Ellis and John Lewis , or whether either of the others were pseudonyms for Thomas. Or, indeed, whether Mr. &/or Mrs. Henry J. Thomas were the same pseudonymous person as the others. Several novels were published and republished by Beadle with the author listed alternatively by 2 or 3 of these names. Thomas wrote a number of novels for the House of Beadle, but the other names were credited for some of therm from time to time. Inscribed in pencil on rear free end paper: "Bob Greene / Canaan / NY." Disbound (lacks wraps). Else, Very Good.
Price: $150.00

8109
Ingersoll, Robert G.- John G. Farnsworth, Receiver of the Bankers' and Merchants' Telegraph Co. vs. Western Union Telegraph Co. Robert G. Ingersoll's Opening Speech to the Jury. Delivered May 21st, 1886. New York N.P. (? Privately Published) 1886. First Edition. 40 pp. 8vo. Pamphlet. Salmon Printed Paper Covers. 267 NUC 0080223 The beginning of an important court case involving the major telegraph companies in the east. The receiver of the bankrupt Bankers' and Merchants' Telegraphic Company was trying to recover its property from the rapacious Western Union Telegraph Co. and the devious fiinancier Jay Gould. This opening speech of the lawyer for the receiver outlines his view of the history of the case and the reasons the jury should decide against Western Union Telegraph Co. and Gould, who is called impudent, malicious, avaricious and greedy by Ingersoll. Gould allegedly had sent a violent gang to take over the receiver's property. The mob, at Gould's instigation, allegedly, cut all the telegraph wires of the Bankers' company. A very important incident in the business history of the 19th Century and in the history of the telegraph in America. Ingersoll, a noted lawyer , debater and orator, was especially known for his views as an agnostic, frequently attracting criticism on the part of advocates of religious thinking, particularly in the aftermath of Darwin's "Origin of Species." Ingersoll authored numerous essays and volumes, including "Some Mistakes of Moses," which was parodied by James Neil Bethune in his "Some Mistakes of Ingersoll." Stains on Front Cover. Chips from Edges of Cover, Not Involving Text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $210.00

11365
Tourgée, Albion W[inegar].- An Appeal to Caesar. New York. Fords, Howard, & Hulbert. 1884. Illustrated. First Edition. 422 pp. 12mo. Green publisher’s cloth, ruled, illustrated and decorated in black on spine and front cover. Titled in gilt on spine and in black on front cover. Floral end papers. Afro-Americana LCP/HSP #10348. BAL 20358 (Printing Sequence A). Albion W. Tourgée (1838–1905) was a novelist of the 19th century and is well represented for his fiction in Wright III. He was an ardent abolitionist and his most famous work, “A Fool’s Errand, by One of the Fools”, summarizes his views on the ill-treatment of Blacks in the South and the failures of Reconstruction. He served in several engagements in the Civil War 1861–63, and was wounded at the First Battle of Bull Run. He graduated from law school and after the war moved to North Carolina, as a carpet-bagger. Failing to block the anti-Reconstructionists despite his prominence as a judge, he left the South in 1879. He confronted the Ku Klux Klan and litigated for the plaintiff in the famous Supreme Court case (separate but equal) Plessy v. Ferguson (1896).He is known to have coined the term “Color-blindness” as a racial metaphor. He died in 1905, serving as American Consul in Bordeaux, France. This work, “An Appeal to Caesar”, is an important summary of the development of his ideas on slavery and race relations in the United States. It is well documented with convincing statistics that support his views. His ideas on separate, but unequal, contributed importantly to the 1954 Supreme Court decision on racial segregation in the public schools of America. A near fine copy of an undervalued but important title. Very Good +.
Price: $245.00

11458
Webster, Daniel- A Discourse in Commemoration of the Lives and Services of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Delivered in Faneuil Hall, Boston, August 2, 1826. Boston, MA. Cummings, Hilliard and Company. 1826. First Edition. 62 pp. 8vo Paper wraps. Sewn. American Imprints 27583. Sabin 102269. Daniel Webster (1782–1852) was a noted American lawyer, U. S. legislator (from New Hampshire and Massachusetts), senator (from Massachusetts) , speechifier, and Secretary of State under 3 presidents. He was also an outspoken supporter of the Union in pre-Civil War years. A conservative (Whig) and elitist, he favored a strong central government and opposed Andrew Jackson. Here, in one of his most noted speeches in early career, he commemorates two illustrious presidents who died on July 4,1826. This address, delivered in the “Cradle of Liberty” in Boston, celebrates both men, friendly opponents in their public careers in the new nation. Webster’s eloquence and communication skills are well-ilustrated in this document. Removed. Mild soiiing and toning of front wrap.Small chip from fore-edge of front cover. Lacks rear wrap. Else, a crisp, Very Good copy.
Price: $125.00

11459
El C. Martin Rivera (?).- Mexican Almanac for 1829: Calendario Manual para el Ano de 1829 Sesto que Arregla al Meridiano de Mexico. Mexico City, Mexico José Mårquez, Printer 1829. Illustrated First Edition (?). 48 pp. 3” W x 3-1/2” H. Self-bound with illustrated cover. A small crude and simple calendar printed in Mexico for 1829, a year fraught with at least two changes of the Presidency. There a summary of history and governmental issues, it considers the creation of the world to have occurred 7028 years previously, and Noah’s flood to have been 4786 years previously. There is a list of Governmental officers since the independence of Mexico. These items are followed by a day by day calendar, listing the position of the sun and the moon in the Zodiac, various saints’ days and holidays, weather predictions. The cover is embellished with a decorative border and a charming woodcut, showing a globe, a telescope and possibly an anemometer or wind vane. Inside are very small woodcuts of the sun, the moon in various phases and, perhaps some planets. There was a long tradition of almanacs in Mexico, dating back centuries. Earlier Mexican almanacs had a divinatory function and dealt with sacrifice, warfare and weather predictions (Elizabeth H. Boone, Cycles of Time and Meaning in Mexican Books of Fate, Univ. Texas Pr., 2013). This is a Christian almanac with a multitude of Saints Days, but weather predictions do persist as well as astronomical observations. Slightly soiled front cover. Edges of first 2 leaves and last 3 leaves a bit ragged. Loss of a bit of text on cover and pp. 1–3 due to chips from lower corner. Else, Good
Price: $375.00

11461
Hibbard, Harry ( Speaker of the House of Representatives [NH]) and Asa P. Cate (President of the Senate [NH]).- Thos. W. Dorr - His Imprisonment, ETC. Report to the Legislature of New Hampshire Relative to the Imprisonment of Thomas W. Dorr. December 19, 1845. Read, and Laid upon the Table. US Govt. Document. 29th Congress, 1st Session. Ho. of Reps. Doc. No. 41. Washington, D.C. U.S.Government. Ritchie & Heiss, printers. 18745. 8 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Sewn. Approved by John H. Steele, Governor, and copy certified by Thomas P. Treadwell, Secretary of State .The legislature of New Hampshire had argued in 1844 that Rhode Island, in its trial of Thomas W. Dorr, had treated him unjustly and tyrannically. Rhode Island Assembly replied that New Hampshire, in “ignorance and impertinence” had spoken falsely in its charge that RI had ignored forms of justice and disregarded Dorr’s rights. RI had claimed that Dorr had committed treason against the State, in accord with an ex post facto action of the RI Assembly in 1842. Dorr had been tried by a court packed with his enemies, men who had prejudged the case, Further, Dorr had been prevented from admitting evidence important to his argument, There were further violations of Dorr’s 6th Amendment constitutional rights. New Hampshire goes on to substantiate in specific detail its charges against Rhode Island and to order the sending of this report to the governors of all the States and Territories and to its own members of Congress. Minor soft crease at upper corner near foredge. Else Very Good.
Price: $175.00

11483
Hibbard, Harry Speaker of the House of Representatives [NH]) and Asa P. Cate (President of the Senate [NH]).- Thos. W. Dorr - His Imprisonment, ETC. Report to the Legislature of New Hampshire Relative to the Imprisonment of Thomas W. Dorr. December 19, 1845. Read, and Laid upon the Table. US Govt. Document. 29th Congress, 1st Session. Ho. of Reps. Doc. No. 41. Washington, D.C. U.S.Government. Ritchie & Heiss, printers. 1845. 8 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Sewn. Approved by John H. Steele, Governor, and copy certified by Thomas P. Treadwell, Secretary of State .The legislature of New Hampshire had argued in 1844 that Rhode Island, in its trial of Thomas W. Dorr, had treated him unjustly and tyrannically. Rhode Island Assembly replied that New Hampshire, in “ignorance and impertinence” had spoken falsely in its charge that RI had ignored forms of justice and disregarded Dorr’s rights. RI had claimed that Dorr had committed treason against the State, in accord with an ex post facto action of the RI Assembly in 1842. Dorr had been tried by a court packed with his enemies, men who had prejudged the case, Further, Dorr had been prevented from admitting evidence important to his argument, There were further violations of Dorr’s 6th Amendment constitutional rights. New Hampshire goes on to substantiate in specific detail its charges against Rhode Island and to order the sending of this report to the governors of all the States and Territories and to its own members of Congress. Minor toning. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

11562
[Sheet Music]. Crosby, Warner.- Topsy’s in Town. Characteristic March, Two Step and Cake Walk. Also Published as a Song. New York. Arthur W. Tams. 1899. Illustrated cover. First Edition. 4 pp. Fo. Grandly illustrated sheet music, satirizing African Americans and a grown-up Topsy, of H. B. Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”. A graphic yellow cover, printed in black, showing an elegant young adult Black woman, dressed for on-the-town, carrying a fan and topped by a milliner’s concoction. In the background is a silhouette of a crowd of men in top hats and derbies. Great typography. Publisher’s ads on rear cover. In the Sheldon Harris Collection at the University of MIssissippi. Warner Crosby (active, 1898–1925) was a composer of popular songs at the turn of the 19th to 20th Centuries. Besides this song, he composed “Behave, Mister Man, Behave”, “Nellie Claire” and “Cleo”, ”The Boom-e-’Rag’”, and the music for Good Mister Santa Clause, Bring Back Momma” and “Cunnin’ Carolina Coon”. A few closed short teas in front margins. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

11563
[Sheet Music]. Russell, Henry (Music) and Mackay, Chas. (Words).- To The West! To The West! To the Land of the Free! From the New and Popular Entertainment “The Emigrant’s Progress or Life in the Far West” by Henry Russell. London. Musical Bouquet Office. N.D. [ca. 1840–50] Illustrated. First Edition. 4 pp. Fo. Disbound. Ewen, Pop.Am.Comp., pp.148–50. Appleton's Cycl. Am. Biog. Concise DNB. Krummel & Sadie, p. 212 (for Musical Bouquet). Dichter Handbook, #1820. Composed and sung by Henry Russell in "The Emigrant's Progress". Front cover illustrations (woodblock engravings) probably from "Mr. Henry Russell's Panorama of America". The central image is of the composer seated at the piano, with a large sailing ship evident through the window. The surrounding images portray an American ship; a British ship; a bucolic domestic landscape with a father returning from a row, being greeted by wife and child, before a cabin in the woods, amidst mountains and lakes ; a view of Niagara Falls; a scene of white dudes in a tavern, one having his boots removed by a Black (? slave), with another Black standing by with his slippers; a view of a slave auction. These images were to be used by other Russell productions for the Musical Bouquet in the series on “The Emigrant’s Progress”, an autobiographical series by Russell. A facsimile of Russell's signature on the front cover. Henry Russell (1812–1900) was born in England of Jewish parentage. He studied with Bellini and knew Rossini, Donizetti and Meyerbeer. To seek his fortune he moved to America from 1833 to 1841, where his income came from his concerts (piano and voice recitals), not from his immensely popular sheet music, for which he received no royalties. Among his famous works are "Woodman, Spare That Tree," "The Indian Hunter," "That Old Gang of Mine," etc. He championed social causes like abolition (as in this item), reform of mental asylums and temperance. he was closely associated with "The Musical Bouquet”. This song expresses the eagerness of an emigré and his enthusiasm for the freshness and opportunities in this new western country (the U.S.). Dr. Charles Mackay (1814–1889) often wrote the poems for Russell's music. As a subeditor for "The Morning Chronicle", 1834–44, he must have known Charles Dickens. on p. 4 is inscribed i ink: “Presented by Miss Allen [or Helen] / Barnsby, Yorkshire / December/53”. Toned. A 2” transverse closed tear across mid-page, with very old repair by sewing with linen thread. The tear does not encroach on the music. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

11564
[Sheet Music]. Turner, J. W.- Funeral March in Memory of Lieut. General Winfield Scott, Composed by J. W. Turner. Boston, MA. Oliver Ditson & Co. 1866. .First Edition. 3 pp. Fo. Decorative engraved cover. Numerous elaborate type faces. Fisher, 150 Years of Music Publ. in the U.S. 1783–1933, pp. 55–56. Winfield Scott (1786 –1866), “Old Fuss and Feathers”, was a noted American General, perhaps one of the best of all time. He served in the Black Hawk War, the War of 1812, the Seminole Campaign, briefly in the Civil War and, most notably and heroically, in the Mexican American War. After the latter, he served as Military Governor of Mexico for a time. Under Andrew Jackson and Van Buren, he was charged with carrying out the removal of the Cherokee Nation to Oklahoma. Although not in favor of the action he complied, with great loss to the Cherokee people. At 6” 5” in height, he was the tallest man ever to be nominated for the Presidency (by the Whig Party in 1852), but was defeated by Franklin Pierce. The date of this musical publication, the address of Ditson at 277 Washington St,, and the co-publishers, suggest that this item is a First Edition. Toned along hinge. Water stain on each page. Else, Very Good.
Price: $100.00

11579
Smith, Captain John.- Advertisements for the Unexperienced Planters of New England, or Anywhere; or, The Pathway to Erect a Plantation. With a Fac-simile of Smith’s Map of New England, with Additions and Corrections as Published in 1635. Boston, MA. William Veazie 1865 [1631]. Illustrated with large folding map of New England. Facsimile Edition. One of 250 copies. 72 pp. Small 4to. Original brown publisher’s cloth, titled n glt on spine. Beveled boards, .e.g. Other edges untrimmed. Refs.: Sabn 82816 A facsimile of the last printed work by Captain John Smith, former Governor of Virginia and Admiral of New England, first printed in 1631. Smith’s map of New England, the most accurate map of Massachusetts at the time, was updated multiple times (this the ninth) for various publications by Smith after its initial publication by him in 1616. It was finally modified for the “Hondy’s Mercator” {Hondius] of 1635, 4 years after Smith’s death. The book is intended to be a vade mecum for newcomers to New England or Virginia by John Smith, whose experience encompassed both colonies. Mild wear at ends of spine and corners. Else, Very Good
Price: $250.00

11584
Quincy, Edmund.- Where Will It End? A View of Slavery in the United States in Its Aggressions and Results. A Communication Supposed to Be Made by a Leading Democrat Living in “Egypt” or Southern Illinois. Originally Published in the “Atlantic Monthly,” under the Title of “Where Will It End?” Providence, RI. Knowles, Anthony & Co., Printers. 1863. 23 pp. 8vo. Printed tan paper wraps. Rwf.: DAB, Vol. XV, 306-7 ( for Quincy). A ringing anti-slavery pamphlet by Edmund Quincy (1808–77). He argues from economic and political scence, fitting to Adam Smith, Veblen and Karl Marx. The author was a noted reformer, the second son of Josiah Quincy III. An abolitionist editor, author and reformer, Quincy wrote his father’s biography, a romance and a volume of stories. He was a member and officer of the Massachusetts and American Anti-Slavery Societies, editing “The Abolitionist”, contriibuting to the “Liberty Bell” In 1844, he became editor of the “National Anti-Slavery Standard” and filled in for William Lloyd Garrison as editor of “The Liberator” from time to time. As a reformer, Edmund Quincy “condemned the use of force in resisting evil, renounced allegiance to human government and favored non-union with the American South” (Wikipedia). His millennial beliefs show up in his publishing “the Non-Resistant” with Maria Weston Chapman and Wiliiam Lloyd Garrison, a publication which lasted only 2 years, 1839–40. Few small spots of foxi ng, chiefly on end papers. Mild toning. Else Very Good.
Price: $275.00

11586
Potter, Elisha R.- Memoir Concerning the French Settlements and French Settlers in the Colony of Rhode Island Providence, RI. Sidney S. Rider. 1879. First Edition. 81 pp. + notes on specific families. 8vo. Yellow-greenstiff paper wraps, printed. Pages uncut and untrimmed. The repeal of the Edict of Nantes in the 16h century, which had guaranteed French Protestants religious freedom, was the main motivation for the emigration of French Huguenots to Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York and the American South. The emigration off the French to Canada, and Maine, more likely, was derived from enterprise and opportunity. The noted 19th century Rhode Island scholar, bookseller and publisher, Sidney Rider, reviews the documents supporting this thesis, documents held chiefly in records of Rhode Island and the British State Paper Office in London. Minor soiling of rear cover. One cm. closed tear at leading edge of front cover. Slight wear to upper edge of spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

9968
Webster, Daniel.- [Pamphlet]. The Rhode island Question. Mr. Webster's Argument in the Supreme Court of the United States in the Case of Martin Luther vs. Luther M. Borden and others, January 27th, 1848. Washington, DC. J. and G. S. Gideon. 1848. First Edition. 20 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wraps. Sewn. Bartlett, Biblio. RI, pp. 270–1. Mowry, "The Dorr War," pp.232–56. In 1841–42, there was in Rhode Island considerable agitation for extension of suffrage beyond property holders. Thomas Dorr headed the movement which, without sanction of the authorities, held elections and developed a new constitution. A rebellion ensued and Dorr was arrested and imprisoned for treason. The State of Rhode Island was sued in defense of Dorr and others. Daniel Webster, representing the State, reviewed the arguments for and against the rebels and concludes that the State did have the authority to arrest and imprison them. He finds his authority in the Constitution of the United States, leaving such decisions to the States without review by the Supreme Court. The Court agreed in an important decision and let it stand. Of interest, according to McLoughlin ("RI, A History", p 127), the national reaction to this decision contributed to the force of the rejection of Southern secession at the start of the Civil War. Small chips from eges of paper cover. Slight soiling of covers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

11482
U. S. Government Document.- 28th Congress, 1st Session, Ho. of Reps Executive Doc. No, 225. United States Troops in Rhode Island, &c. Message from the President of the United States in Answer to a resolution of the House of Representatives relative to the Employment of United States troops in Rhode Island, and transmitting documents in relation to the recent difficulties in that State. April 10. 1844. Washington, DC. US Government. Blair & Rives, printers. 1844. First Edition. 179 pp. + 4 pp. of slightly different text (pp. 7–10) inserted before p. 179. 8vo. Disbound. Sewn A virtual documentary history of the events in the development of the People’s Convention and Constitution for Rhode Island in 1841–42, the Dorr Rebellion, the subsequent arrest of Dorr, his imprisonment and the role of the Federal Government led by President John Tyler in abetting the Charter Government of the State. With the sending of U. S. troops to RI in order to maintain order and support the Charter Government, there were protests to the House of Representatives by both the majority and the minority of the RI Assembly, complaining of the U. S. interference in the affairs of RI, but with different perspectives, the majority supporting the Charter government and the minority supporting the People’s Constitution. Tyler had sent the troops to support the Charterists. The U. S. Congress had requested of President Tyler this whole series of documents so that it might better understand the series of events concerning the rebellion. Included are both the People’s Constitution , the original 17th C. RI Charter from King Charles and Oliver Cromwell, and the subsequent constitution (in its various serial forms) up to the Rebellion, as well as the subsequent Constitution enacted after the Rebellion. Associated correspondence of the President, the Governor of RI, legislators, etc. is included as well as warrants for the arrest of Dorr. U.S. Troops were, in eventuality, not required to enforce the peace, for Dorr’s troops were dispersed in Chepachet, RI, and the rebellion was concluded. Dorr was later arrested and imprisoned for 3 years. President Tyler indicates that his actions were justified and led to suppression of the rebellion and the subsequent revision of the RI Constitution to a more liberal form without enforcement of the actions of the People’s Convention and the People’s Constitution. Mild toning and foxing. Traces of paperbinding on spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $450.00

11484
U. S. Government Documents (Two Documents): 28th Congress, 1st Session, Ho. of Reps. (1) Doc. No, 232: Rhode Island. Protest of the Legislature of Rhode Island, against The right of the Congress of the United States, or of either House thereof, to decide or inquire into the question whether the constitution of the State, legally, peaceably, and freely adopted by the people thereof, in November, 1842, is or is not the lawful constitution of the State; and (2) Doc. No. 233: Rhode Island–Protest. Protest of the Minority Members of the Legislature of the State of Rhode Island, against The protest and declaration of the majority of the same Legislature. Both dated April 16, 1844, as Read and laid upon the table. Washington, DC. US Government. Blair & Rives, print. 1844. First Edition. 8 pp.; 4 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Sewn. Two documents regarding the Dorr Rebellion of 1841–42, when the Peoples Convention had attempted to form a new constitution and government for Rhode Island, with a legislature based upon republican principles, rather than one composed of a small number of powerful landowners. The new Industrial Revolution had led to a large number of industrial employees displacing a small number of landed agrarians, who held the power in the franchise and in the legislature under a constitution based on the 17th century Charter of King George. Dorr was defeated and imprisoned, but the controversy persisted for years. Here, in Doc. 232, the Legislative Majority of Rhode Island, under the old constitution, protest and declare the State against interference by the U. S. Congress with the internal government and the constitution of the State. The U.S. House of Representatives had appointed a committee with powers to subpoena people and documents, a power against which the RI legislative majority was protesting. The latter argued that there was no right of the U. S. legislature to do this to a State which had always operated according to its constitution and was a peaceful and loyal constituent of the original 13 states. In Doc. 233, however, the minority protest against the protest, arguing that the citizens had a right to change their constitution and adapt it to changes in circumstances, especially since the old government had been inadequate to its duties for a long time. They argued that the President of the U. S. had unjustly interfered after consultation with select members of the popularly revoked Charter government. The People’s Constitution had been appropriately established in a republican manner and ratified by vote of the People. Because the president had invaded the rights of free citizens of RI and the U. S., he should be impeached and the truth established in the subsequent trial. They also protest the military order issued for the arrest of Thomas Dorr, an act the protesting group called “piracy". Minor foxing and toning. Else, Very Good.
Price: $375.00

11488
U.S. Government Document. No. 92.- Report of the Committee on the Suppression of the Slave Trade. April 12, 1822. [Washington, DC]. [US Government] 1822. First Edition. 92 pp. (with added material) 8vo. Self bound. Disbound Refs.: http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/USN/DuBoisAppB.html. House Reports, 17 Cong. 1 sess. II. No. 92, p. 4; Annals of Cong., 17 Cong. 1 sess. p. 1538. A boldly anti-slavery report of 1822. In January of that year, the U.S. House Committee on the Suppression of the Slave Trade was instructed by resolution of the House to inquire and then report on whether laws of the United Sates prohibiting traffic in slaves had been violated and to suggest remedies for that. This is their report with the evidentiary material appended. President Munroe, under an act of Congress in 1819, had declared the slave trade to be punished as piracy and measures created for restoration of captured slaves to their native country. At least four Naval excursions had carried out the charge with restitution of captured slaves, but the Committee found this to be inadequate due to to Naval use of small vessels, unable to pursue the slavers. Only about 550 slaves were captured by the U.S. Navy. The Committee recommended that the President be empowered to use whatever means he had to expand this activity and to help patrol the coast of Africa to end the practice of new enslavement. The Committee reviews the many actions of the United States from 1794 on to exterminate the slave trade. Portugal was to end slavery in 1823. Britain, by treaty with Spain, Portugal and the Netherlands, created a mutual right to visit and search each other’s merchant ships for slaves with international courts to adjudicate the issues. The U.S. had been invited to join, but issues of American Law kept them from joining. American Naval observers testified to the enormous size of this lucrative trade with American participation. Therefore, the Committee urged the U.S. to join in this mutual search of merchant vessels, without ceding this right of search in times of peace, as the only way the trade could be ended. Documentary examination of the actions and testimony on the issue in many countries of Europe, including the 1815 Congress of Vienna, is provided in the subsequent 76 pages. The chairman of the Committee was Joseph Hemphill (1770–1842), a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, lawyer, jurist, Federalist and Jacksonian, and Representative of Pennsylvania in U.S. House. Owner’s signature at head of p. 11: “Ja[me]s Pett.[? -y;? -it]”. Moderate foxing. Small tear at head of p. 1, not encroaching on text, with crude repair. Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

11489
Anonymous.- Four Articles on Thomas Wilson Dorr. In the New-Bedford [MA] Register,Vol. VII No. 4, Tuesday, January 21, 1845. {Wm. Young Editor]. New Bedford, MA. New-Bedford Register. 1845. First Edition. 4 pp. Fo. Loose, as issued. Refs.: Gregory, American Newspapers, Union List, 1937, pp. 293–94 An issue of the weekly New-Bedford Register, reporting four articles relevant to the Dorr Rebellion. According to Gregory, The New-Bedford Weekly Register was published 1831–46 (?). A front page article entitled “Scenes in the Rhode Island Legiislature” is a witty diatribe against a bill in the Rhode Island Assembly for charges for oil, stationery and cheese and crackers incurred by the “ferocious” troops, assembled in Providence as several peaceable citizens, including 2 former Governors, arrived there to discuss “the oppression of Thomas W. Dorr”, then imprisoned for leading the People’s Army bent on changing the constitution of RI in 1842. The article adopts a very ironic tone about the need for military show. Citizens of New York and New Hampshire, siding with Dorr, had threatened RI and suggested that they tear down the prison holding Dorr. The second and longer article, also on the front page quotes the Providence Gazette in reporting the full speech of Mr. Cheeney [sic!, ?Cheney], to the Committee, in favor of the Bill before the RI Legislature in response to petitions to execute an unconditional liberation of Dorr. Mr. Cheeney calls upon the Assembly not to require Dorr’s recantation of deeply held opinions, but to act mercifully and to liberate this honest and loyal man. The third article, on p. 2, is a long, nearly 2 column editorial on Thomas Dorr, Petitions had been received from Dorr’s father, Sullivan Dorr, as well as from others for the unconditional release of Thomas W. Dorr from prison. A bill in the Assembly to release Dorr if he promises good behavior for a year was debated and passed. In the State Senate the bill for unconditional release failed, but a bill to release if Dorr swore allegiance to the State. Dorr would neither swear allegiance or request his release himself, as some had proposed. Under these bills, Dorr would not have his rights to citizenship restored and the editorial doubted he would sign to the conditions. The fourth article, on p. 3, records the vote in the Rhode Island legislature on the conditional release of Thomas W. Dorr, a bill which passed both the Senate and the Assembly. Mild toning. Old folds. Else, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

11490
Anonymous.- A Series of Articles on Thomas Wilson Dorr. In the Bristol County [MA] Democrat, and Independent Gazette, Vol. XIV.], [Number 27., Taunton, Mass., Friday Morning, July 4, 1845. Taunton, MA., Edmund Anthony, Publisher 1845. First Edition. 4 pp. Fo. Loose, as issued. Refs.: Gregory, American Newspapers, Union List, 1937, pp. 301 An issue of the Bristol County Democrat and Independent Gazette, of Taunton, MA, reporting a series of articles relevant to the Dorr Rebellion. According to Gregory, The Bristol County Democrat was published under various names from 1832 to 1893. This issue, on July 4, celebrates American Independence and the funeral of Andrew Jackson. On p. 2 there is a nearly one-column article on the release of Thomas W. Dorr of RI from State Prison, the liberation of whom was greeted by this newspaper with “unspeakable joy”. Dorr was described as on his way to the house of his father, Sullivan Dorr, when he was greeted by a crowd of supporters, who cheered his liberation and showed the devotion of free men to Dorr’s championship of them The paper enjoins the evil State and factions of Rhode Island to correct the error of failing to restore his just rights of citizenship with his liberation and showers deep criticism of Dorr’s enemies. A second article on p. 2 reports more details on Dorr’s release, heaping praise on him and opprobrium on the State of RI and Dorr’s enemies, referring to him as Governor, The article reprints the speech of Nathan Porter, discoursing on Dorr’s great qualities, expressing the affection of the multitude, Dorr’s contribution to the public, the unspeakable behavior of the State of RI and Dorr’s enemies and testifies to the effectiveness of Dorr as reflected in the election of James K. Polk as President The speech was greeted with enormous cheering, Dorr thanked his supporters and another great address was delivered in his honor by Welcome B. Sayles. The third p. 2 article, quoting from the Providence Gazette, reports the detailed terms of the Rhode Island Amnesty Act, which attempts to correct the premises which permitted Dorr’s conviction. There follow two short articles from the Providence Gazette reporting the continuing celebration of Dorr, with comments about his weakened condition. There is speculation, borne out by history, that he would not recover fully. Also on p. 2 is a report from the Providence Herald that Dorr will be present at the Providence celebration of July 4 and American Independence in Market Square of that city, with a band, a crowd and possibly speeches. On p. 3 is a report from the Boston Times that the liberation of Dorr from unjust incarceration was celebrated on July 1 by a crowd in Cambridgeport, MA, 04 with the flying of flags, a one hundred gun salute, the shooting of rockets in the evening and the feeling of justice done to a patriot Dorr, a “true friend of the people” There is an incidental note that Hon. Pliny Merrick had been invited by the City Government of Boston to deliver the eulogy of the late President Andrew Jackson. Merrick, five years later, was to represent unsuccessfully Professor John White Webster of Harvard at his trial for the murder of Dr. George Parkman, a benefactor of the Medical College. Mild toning. Old folds. Small crack at center fold. Else, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

11496
[Autograph].- The Clipped Autograph of Ida Lewis, Dated Feb 12th 1881. N.P. [? Newport, RI]. N.Pub. 1881. First Edition. 1 p. 4-1/8” W x 2-7/8” H. Loose, as issued. CycAmBiog, Appleton. An autograph of Idawalley Zorada Lewis (1842–1911), bearing the date Feb 12,1881. Ida Lewis. an American heroine in Newport, RI, was born there in 1841. Her father was the keeper of the Lime Rock Lighthouse in Newport Harbor, a position she assumed herself. A skilled sailor, swimmer and rower, from 1858 to 1869, she rescued over a 12 men and children (perhaps as many as 36) who had met boating disasters in the harbor. The first woman lighthouse keeper in America, she was the first woman to receive the gold Congressional medal for lifesaving.The citizens of Newport presented her with a boat in admiration of her bravery. She married in in 1870, but the marriage lasted only 2 years. Most of her adult life was spent alone at the lighthouse and her last recue occurred at age 63. The major yacht club in Newport, RI, is named after her, and Lime Rock, upon which is built the yacht club, was renamed by the RI legislature Ida Lewis Rock. She had been much celebrated by Presidents, generals and public figures, & in songs. A US Coast Guard buoy-tender was named after her. The autograph is laid down on what appears to be a clipping from an invitation or place card with the calligraphic inscription “Miss Ida Lewis/Feb 12 1881”. Very Good. 200.00 11495 Cruikshank, George and William Hone.- [Pamphlet] The Queen’s Matrimonial Ladder, A National Toy, with Fourteen Step Scenes; and Illustrations in Verse, with Eighteen Other Cuts. By the Author of “The Political House That Jack Built”. London. William Hone. 1820. Eighteen illustrations by Cruikshank. Fifth Edition. 24 pp., unnumbered . Ads for Hones’s publications on last leaf. 8vo. Self wraps. Sewn. Disbound from a collection. Cohn 680. Patten, Life, I, pp. 157–68. Continuing his very successful work with William Hone, this satirical verse is illustrated by George Cruikshank, poking fun at political leaders and self-important professions dedicated to the stifling of liberty and suppression of a free press. The main target here is the Prince Regent, who became King George IV. The comic illustrations are grand. The author of the text and publisher, Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. In this "incendiary" pamphlet, Cruikshank continues to certify himself as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson. This work is a worthy successor to the most famous pamphlet by Hone and Cruikshank, “The Political House That Jack Built”, which sold 100.000 copies, a new edition coming out almost daily, and "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte”.(quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). This pamphlet is a verse parody of the Prince and the history of his dissolute life and then his marriage and the very public brouhaha he caused by his accusations of infidelity, etc. cast at the Queen. She was ultimately vindicated by a public commission and the effect of Hone’s and Cruikshank’s pamphlets. This pamphlet is venomous in its accusations against the Prince Regent and ultimate King. The copy cited in Cohnb is dated 1826. In the earliest edition of the pamphlet, a pasteboard folding ladder, with the stages of the affair labeled on progressive rungs up and down, was included with the pamphlet, The illusration on the front of the pamphlet shows the prototype (Patten , Life, I, p.178). Hone, in an apocryphal story, claims that an unnamed individual tried to bribe him not to publish this pamphlet. Patten (op.cit)expresses skepticism of the veracity of Hone’s story and writes vividly of this pamphlet while he reviews the history of the Queen Caroline affair and the Hone/Cruikshank role in this history (Life, I, 177–186). Minor toning. Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

11503
Everett, Hon. Edward; and Rev. John A Todd.- A Tribute to the Memory of Washington Irving. An Address by Hon. Edward Everett, before the Massachusetts Historical Society. Delivered at Boston, December 15, 1859. & A Sermon by Rev. John A. Todd, Delivered at Tarrytown, Dec. 11, 1859. In The Pulpit and Rostrum. Sermons, Orations, Popular Lectures, &c., Phonographically Reported by Andrew J. Graham and Chas. B. Collar. No. 10, January 15th, 1860, pp. 233–256. New York. H. H. Lloyd & Co. 1860. First Edition. 8 pp. 16 pp. Publishers’ ads on covers. 12mo. Orange printed paper wraps. Sewn. An encomium for Washington Irving on the occasion of his death on 28 November 1859 at age 76 years. The first tribute is by Edward Everett in an address to the Massachusetts Historical Society. It is a simple history of Irving’s literary and diplomatic achievements. Everett, noted for his loquaciousness is here relatively brief, certainly briefer than his Gettysburg Address, which preceded Lincoln’s on the same occasion, 4 years later. The sermon by Rev Todd is longer, a tribute to Irving as a person, and, as would be expected, to God. The two documents are printed on consecutive pages of Pulpit and Rostrum, but in different typefaces and on paper of slightly different size. Covers soiled. Tiny chips from edges of covers. Mild foxing of a few leaves. Else, Very Good.
Price: $28.00

11504
[Masonry} Records of the First Lodge in Boston, including a Facsimile in Florid Calligraphic Hand of the Register for the Meeting of Wednesday, April 23, 1740. In The New England Freemason, Vol. I, No. 2, Sereno D. Nickerson, A.M. and Rev. Charles H. Titus, A.M., Editors, Boston, February, 1874, pp. 57–68. Boston, MA. Printed by Frank Wood. 1874. First Edition. Pp. 57–104 (whole issue) Ads on covers. 8vo. Grey illustrated printed covers. Illustration is engraved portrait of Henry Price, with facsimile signature, dated 1733. Leading edges untrimmed. Facsimile bound in after front covers. Errata slip for Vol. I, No.1 bound in before rear covers. Sewn. The records of the first chapters of Masonry in Boston, from 1738 to 1792 were rediscovered. The most interesting to the society were the records of the first Lodge in Boston, 1738–61, described here. The penmanship is described as beautiful, worthy of the most accomplished professor of at of the present day (1874). The inclusion of a page from 1741 in facsimile confirms that impression. Election to membership was only if the vote was unanimous of the membership. The By-Laws are listed. The requisite regalia is discussed. Henry Price, whose portrait adorns the cover of the Journal, was apparently the Grand Master. The customs, the exclusivity of membership, the ritual of toasting and the need for heavy, break resistant glasses for these rituals are fully discussed. Other articles examine the alleged anti-Masonic attitude of William H. Seward, U. S. Secretary of State, Masonry in Cuba, the recoronation of the King of Siam, several poems and editorial miscellany. Mild foxing of front cover. Else, Very Good +.
Price: $75.00

11506
[Newspaper] Anonymous.- The Providence Gazette and Country Journal. (Vol. XXIV.) (No. 1229), Saturday, July 21, 1787. Providence, RI. The Providence Gazette. 1787. Title engraved on wood with intertwined vines as surround. First Edition. 2 pp. [of 4 pp.] Small Fo. Unbound as issued. Refs.: Gregory, Union List Newspapers, p.635. Cushing, HistBiblioAmNewspapers, II, 1005–11. Lawrence Wroth, The First Press in Providence, in AAS Proceedings, Oct., 1941, pp. 351–83. M. A. McCorison, The Wages of John Carter’s Journeyman Printers, ibid., 1972 , pp.273–303, . A defective copy in that pp. 3–4 are lacking. Overall, an interesting issue of the Providence Gazette from 1787, the first page of which is consumed by an article on “Directions for recovering Persons, who are supposed to be dead, from Drowning; also for preventing and curing the Disorders produced by drinking cold Water, or other cold Liquors, and by the Action of noxious Vapors, Lightning, and excessive Heat and Cold, upon the human Body.”These were published by”Order of the Humane Society of Philadelphia”. The article is signed (in print) by a number of physicians of Philadelphia, including Benjamin Rush, Caspar Wistar, and Samuel P. Griffitts. On p. 2 are several additional important articles, the first being a quotation from James Ramsay’s “Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves”, reporting a verified anecdote showing the intelligence, sensitivity and humanity of some slaves, especially one known as “Quashi”. It modestly counters the generalized view of slaves and is abolitionist in sentiment. Other articles contain reports from London on the anecdote of a dying American whose fortune was stolen by his landlord, of a comet expected in the next summer with the possible dissolution of the comet as it approaches the sun (like Comet Isus of 2014). A great storm on Jupiter was also reported to have occurred in 1680, a planet judged then to be over 1000 times larger than earth. Also reported is the confident expectation of the collapse of the British Empire because of the enormous interest on the national debt (nothing changes), a sum amounting to over £24,000 per day. There is a further story of an uprising by the Creek Indians resulting in indiscriminate scalping of citizens and slaves in Georgia. The Providence Gazette and Country Journal was published under that name from 1762 to 1795, later under other names until The Rhode Island American terminated in 1825. As the first newspaper published in Providence, it was founded and owned by William Goddard and printed by his sister, Mary Katherine. Goddard became the local postmaster in Providence and was later the founder of the Constitutional Postal Department, which yet later became the US Post Office Department. In 1767, Goddard withdrew from the business, selling it in 1768 to John Carter, who was publisher at the time of this issue. Lacks pp. 3–4. Creased. Toned. Mild foxing. Three small tears at creases, without loss of text. Else, Good.
Price: $175.00

11508
Monroe, James.- Message from the President of the United States, Trnsmitting A Report from the Secretary of the Treasury in Compliance with a Resolution of the Senate, of the 13th of Last Month, Requesting Him “To cause to be laid before it, a statement, showing the measures that have been taken to collect the balances to be due, from the several supervisors of the old direct tax of two millions;…….” Senate Document [101]. February 2, 1819. Washington, DC. US Government Senate Document. Printed by E. De Krafft, Printer. 1819. First Edition. 17 pp. 5 Folding charts. 8vo. Disbound. Sewn. Top edge trimmed. In the early period after the War of Independence, there was considerable discussion of the issue of powers of taxation. This issue became very important during the Panic of 1819. Part of the failure of the Articles of Confederation was due to controversies over these powers, contributing to the weakness of the Federal government. In the Federalist Papers of Hamilton, Madison and Jay, much attention was paid, especially by Hamilton, to this subject (e.g.,see Federalist Papers Nos. 12, 21, 30–36). To resolve much argument about taxation powers, as contrasting the central government with the several states, Hamilton stated the importance of relegating Direct taxes to the Federal Government, while assigning more Indirect taxing power to the States. He recognized the likely need of the Federal Government for additional taxes, but worried over a potential power of the Federal Government to tax the states. The tax laws had been modified in 1802, but some old taxes were uncollected. Under Monroe, the Senate had requested an accounting by the Treasury of the taxes previously owed to the US. and requested this information from the President. Here, Monroe provides these data in reports from the Secretary of the Treasury, the Collector of Revenue and various Supervisors and Inspectors. In these report there is specific indication of suits initiated for tax collection and excuses for their failures. A few small spot of foxing. Mild toning. A one cm. closed tear at front margin. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

11509
Sumner, Hon. Charles.- The Landmark of Freedom. Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, Against Repeal of the Missoury Prohibition of Slavery North of 36º 30’. In the Senate, February 21, 185. Washington, DC Printed at the CongressionaL Globe Office, 1854. First Edition. 16 pp. 8vo. Self-binding. Untrimmed leading edge and foot. Sewn. Double columns. Refs.: Sabin 93663. A speech against the extension of slavery to the Northern territories of Kansas and Nebraska, by the valorous Charles Sumner, Senator from Massachusetts. In 1850, the Missouri Compromise forbad the further extension of slavery in the Northern region of the United States. Here, in 1854, the establishment of the territories of Kansas and Nebraska led to the ultimately successful efforts of the Southern Senators (and Congressmen) to overturn the Compromise and permit the extension of slavery to those regions. Leading the opposition to repeal of the Missouri Compromise and the extension of slavery was was Charles Sumner.(1811–74). His speech is elaborately eloquent with numerous quotations, both literary and otherwise, and very emotional rhetoric. Sumner failed in his efforts to stave off the repeal of the Missouri Compromise. He was later beaten senseless on the floor of the Senate by a Senator from South Carolina. Mild toning at edge. Some very small chips from lading edge. Else, Very Good.
Price: $44.00

11510
Seward, William H.- Speech of William H. Seward, Delivered at Rochester, Monday, October 25, 1858. Washington, DC. N.P. 1858. First Edition. 8 pp. 8vo. Self-bound. Uncut and untrimmed. Refs.: Sabin 79576. Dumond, Anti-Slavery, The Crusade…, pp. 355–56. Antislavery Origins, p. 100. Not in Blockson. LCP/ HSP Afro-Americana 9306-7 (later editions,under title of The Irrepressible Conflict). An 8 page pamphlet, printed on one sheet and folded in octavo, uncut. Page 8 contains quotations from Washington and Jefferson concerning their views of slavery. Pages 1–7 print the speech on that topic by William H. Seward (18801–72). Seward was a New York politician, who served under Lincoln and Johnson as Secretary of State, and later consummated the purchase of Alaska from Russia. Here Seward delivers a strong anti-slavery speech in Rochester, NY and contrasts the views of the Democratic and the nascent Republican parties. He adopts an historical and international view of the issues. Dumond cites this speech as showing that Seward saw slavery as an issue of free labor vs. slave labor, “an. irrepressible conflict between opposing and enduring forces.” A nice copy of an important pre-Civil War speech. Mild toning at head of pp. 1–2. Minimal wear at folds. Else, Very Good.
Price: $90.00

11517
[Stereoscopic View].- Our Ambassador of the Air––. Col. [Charles A.] Lindberg and Plane Spirit of St. Louis. Meadville, PA. Keystone View Company. ND. [1927]. Illustrated. First Edition. 1 p. 7” W x 3-1/2” H Stereo Card. 2 images on grey card, printed on both sides, curved. Darrah, Stereo Views, p.148. Darrah, World of Stereographs, 149. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, An Illustrated History, p.69 (ill.). Plate No.32062. A stereoscopic image of Charles A. Lindbergh (1902–74) in business suit, standing beside his plane at the Navy Yard in Washington, DC. On May 20, 1927 Charles Lindbergh, a virtually unknown American air mail pilot, landed in France after a 33 hour crossing of the Atlantic from New York in a solo non-stop flight, the first to do so. He instantly became a world-wide hero and began an exciting public and private life. He flew the plane, Spirit of St. Louis, a Ryan monoplane with 46 ft. wingspan, carrying only 458 gallons of fuel, over 35,000 miles in the next year. In his famous trans-Atlantic fllght, his speed averaged just 107.5 mph. He was thereafter known as “Lucky Lindy” and the “Lone Eagle”. Lindbergh was the scion of a Minnesota congressman and did much to promote commercial aviation and airmail services, but was an isolationist, like his father in World War I, and a supporter of Nazi Germany at least into the beginning of World War II. He was married to Anne Morrow Lindbergh, a wealthy writer. Later in the war, he completed 50 combat missions. After his death, it was revealed that he had had at least three German miistresss and fathered children by each. His first child, by his wife, had been kidnapped in 1932 and soon found dead. The trial and execution of the perpetrator was controversial. After his famous flight, Lindbergh traveled Europe for a few weeks and then returned to America via the naval cruiser, “USS Memphis”, sailing into Washiigton, DC, and docking at the Navy Yard in Anacostia, DC. This stereo image was made from photographs at the naval base. A year later, Lindbergh donated the Spirit of St. Louis to the Smithsonian Institution, where it hangs today. Near Fine.
Price: $395.00

11518
[Stereoscopic View].- A Bow View of the Zeppelin Akron Showing the Outer Covering, Akron, Ohio. Meadville, PA. Keystone View Company. ND. [1930–31]. Illustrated. First Edition. 1 p. 7” W x 3-1/2” H Stereo Card. 2 images on grey card, printed on both sides, curved. Refs.: Darrah, Stereo Views, p.148-9. Darrah, World of Stereographs, 148–9. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, An Illustrated History, pp. 68–71. Plate No. 32745. A stereoscopic image of the Naval airship Akron (ZRS-4), under construction. From views similar to the rare series of 100 views of the construction of the USS Macon in Akron, photographed by Lynn Skeels (Waldsmith, p. 69). The maiden flight of the U.S.S. Akron, the largest airship in the world, even larger than the Graf Zeppelin, carrying 115 passengers occurred on September 23, 1931. Its airship dock was so large that over 2.5 football fields fit in. Clouds formed inside the airship and rain fell with sudden temperature changes. Being filled with helium gas, it was non-inflammable, unlike the Hindenberg, which exploded with great loss of life on landing in New Jersey in 1936, effectively ending the prospects of airships as passenger conveyors. The Akron had swivel propellors and eight 12 cylinder Maybach motors with a total horsepower of 4480, till then the greatest horsepower of any vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine. The Akron was constructed by the Goodyear Zeppelin Corp. The addition of the skin was a complicated process involving tying strips of fabric to the frame with cords passed through numerous eyelets in closely adjacent strips and sealing it with dope, a modified cellulose acetate coating. Another layer of cotton cloth is layered above this and doped as before; then aluminized dope is coated over all. It could be done effectively, without sagging, only on days with low humidity. Both the Macon and the Akron were lost at sea, the latter in the Atlantic on April 4, 1933. Near Fine.
Price: $200.00

11519
[Stereoscopic View].- A Bow View of the Zeppelin Akron Showing the Outer Covering, Akron, Ohio. Meadville, PA. Keystone View Company. ND. [1930–31]. Illustrated. First Edition. 1 p. 7” W x 3-1/2” H Stereo Card. 2 images on grey card, printed on both sides, curved. Refs.: Darrah, Stereo Views, p.148-9. Darrah, World of Stereographs, 148–9. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, An Illustrated History, pp. 68–71. Plate No. 32745. A stereoscopic image of the Naval airship Akron (ZRS-4), under construction. From views similar to the rare series of 100 views of the construction of the USS Macon in Akron, photographed by Lynn Skeels (Waldsmith, p. 69). The maiden flight of the U.S.S. Akron, the largest airship in the world, even larger than the Graf Zeppelin, carrying 115 passengers occurred on September 23, 1931. Its airship dock was so large that over 2.5 football fields fit in. Clouds formed inside the airship and rain fell with sudden temperature changes. Being filled with helium gas, it was non-inflammable, unlike the Hindenberg, which exploded with great loss of life on landing in New Jersey in 1936, effectively ending the prospects of airships as passenger conveyors. The Akron had swivel propellors and eight 12 cylinder Maybach motors with a total horsepower of 4480, till then the greatest horsepower of any vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine. The Akron was constructed by the Goodyear Zeppelin Corp. The addition of the skin was a complicated process involving tying strips of fabric to the frame with cords passed through numerous eyelets in closely adjacent strips and sealing it with dope, a modified cellulose acetate coating. Another layer of cotton cloth is layered above this and doped as before; then aluminized dope is coated over all. It could be done effectively, without sagging, only on days with low humidity. Both the Macon and the Akron were lost at sea, the latter in the Atlantic on April 4, 1933. Near Fine.
Price: $200.00

11522
[Carte de Visite] Abraham Lincoln Washington, DC. NPub., [Matthew Brady] [1864] Illustrated. Unknown Edition. 1 p., as issued Image: 2-1/4” W x 3-9/16” H. Mount: 2-7/16” W x 3-15/16” H. Albumen print , laid down on card. Refs.: W. C. Darrah, Cartes de Visite in 19th Centuru Photography. R. Meredith, Mathew Brady’s Portrait of an Era, image on D.J. Keya Morgan Collection, http://www.mathewbrady.com/portraits.htm. A carte de visite with photograph of Abraham Lincoln during his presidency. It is the image captured by Mathew Brady (1823–96) on 9 February 1864. Sepia toned. No publisher is indicated on card. Possibly a piracy, as happened often with Brady’s cartes de visite. Both Brady and E. Anthony (originally a Brady assistant), noted publishers of cartes de visite, themselves pirated some of the images in their output (Darrah, p.43). We have seen another copy of this famous image on a card signed in print by J. H. Bufford & Sons of Boston with the the photocopying done by John Soule. The J. H. Bufford Co., where Winslow Homer had apprenticed, was an early American publisher of carte-de-visite portraiture; their photographs were often reduced to card size by the illustrious photographer John Soule (Darrah, p.59). Toned at lower edge. Few tiny bits of foxing at edges. Else, Good +.
Price: $275.00

11523
[Carte de Visite] Mary Todd Lincoln. Washington, DC. NPub. [Mathew Brady]. [1861]. Illustrated. Unknown Edition. 1 p., as issued Image: 2-1/4” W x 3-3/4”H. Card:2-3/8” W x 4” H. Albumen print, laid down on card. Refs.: R. Meredith, Mathew Brady’s Portrait of an Era, p. 100. .Kunhardt & Kunhardt,Mathew Brady and His World, 101. Keya Morgan Collection, http://www.mathewbrady.com/portraits.htm. A carte de visite of Mary Todd Lincoln, made from a photograph by Mathew Brady (1823–96) taken of Mrs. Lincoln in her off-the-shoulder Inaugural Ball gown in 1861 and her new pearl necklace from Tiffany’s. Sepia toned. Printed on rear: “Mrs. Lincoln”. No publisher identified. Slight foxing at rt. edge. Else, Good +.
Price: $250.00

11524
[Carte de Visite] Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant Washington, DC. NPub., [Mathew Brady]. [1864]. Illustrated. Unknown Edition. 1 p., as issued Image: 2-3/16” W x3-1/4” H. Card: 2-1/2” W x4” H. Albumen print, laid down on card. Double printed border on card Refs.: R. Meredith, Mathew Brady’s Portrait of an Era, p. 134, 136. Keya Morgan Collection, http://www.mathewbrady.com/portraits.htm. A Mathew Brady (1823–96) portrait of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant (1822–85) in the form of a carte de visite, the photo taken just after Grant’s promotion to this new rank, in early March, 1864, one of a series taken on the same day by Brady. Sepia toned. No publisher identified. Slightly soiled. Else, Good +.
Price: $250.00

11458
Webster, Daniel- A Discourse in Commemoration of the Lives and Services of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Delivered in Faneuil Hall, Boston, August 2, 1826.

Boston, MA. Cummings, Hilliard and Company. 1826. First Edition. 62 pp. 8vo Paper wraps. Sewn. American Imprints 27583. Sabin 102269. Daniel Webster (1782–1852) was a noted American lawyer, U. S. legislator (from New Hampshire and Massachusetts), senator (from Massachusetts) , speechifier, and Secretary of State under 3 presidents. He was also an outspoken supporter of the Union in pre-Civil War years. A conservative (Whig) and elitist, he favored a strong central government and opposed Andrew Jackson. Here, in one of his most noted speeches in early career, he commemorates two illustrious presidents who died on July 4,1826. This address, delivered in the “Cradle of Liberty” in Boston, celebrates both men, friendly opponents in their public careers in the new nation. Webster’s eloquence and communication skills are well-ilustrated in this document. Removed. Mild soiiing and toning of front wrap.Small chip from fore-edge of front cover. Lacks rear wrap. Else, a crisp, Very Good copy.
Price: $125.00

11459
El C. Martin Rivera (?).- Mexican Almanac for 1829: Calendario Manual para el Ano de 1829 Sesto que Arregla al Meridiano de Mexico.

Mexico City, Mexico José Mårquez, Printer 1829. Illustrated First Edition (?). 48 pp. 3” W x 3-1/2” H. Self-bound with illustrated cover. A small crude and simple calendar printed in Mexico for 1829, a year fraught with at least two changes of the Presidency. There a summary of history and governmental issues, it considers the creation of the world to have occurred 7028 years previously, and Noah’s flood to have been 4786 years previously. There is a list of Governmental officers since the independence of Mexico. These items are followed by a day by day calendar, listing the position of the sun and the moon in the Zodiac, various saints’ days and holidays, weather predictions. The cover is embellished with a decorative border and a charming woodcut, showing a globe, a telescope and possibly an anemometer or wind vane. Inside are very small woodcuts of the sun, the moon in various phases and, perhaps some planets. There was a long tradition of almanacs in Mexico, dating back centuries. Earlier Mexican almanacs had a divinatory function and dealt with sacrifice, warfare and weather predictions (Elizabeth H. Boone, Cycles of Time and Meaning in Mexican Books of Fate, Univ. Texas Pr., 2013). This is a Christian almanac with a multitude of Saints Days, but weather predictions do persist as well as astronomical observations. Slightly soiled front cover. Edges of first 2 leaves and last 3 leaves a bit ragged. Loss of a bit of text on cover and pp. 1–3 due to chips from lower corner. Else, Good
Price: $375.00

11461
Hibbard, Harry (Speaker of the House of Representatives [NH]) and Asa P. Cate (President of the Senate [NH]).- Thos. W. Dorr - His Imprisonment, ETC. Report to the Legislature of New Hampshire Relative to the Imprisonment of Thomas W. Dorr. December 19, 1845. Read, and Laid upon the Table.

US Govt. Document. 29th Congress, 1st Session. Ho. of Reps. Doc. No. 41. Washington, D.C. U.S.Government. Ritchie & Heiss, printers. 1845. 8 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Sewn. Approved by John H. Steele, Governor, and copy certified by Thomas P. Treadwell, Secretary of State .The legislature of New Hampshire had argued in 1844 that Rhode Island, in its trial of Thomas W. Dorr, had treated him unjustly and tyrannically. Rhode Island Assembly replied that New Hampshire, in “ignorance and impertinence” had spoken falsely in its charge that RI had ignored forms of justice and disregarded Dorr’s rights. RI had claimed that Dorr had committed treason against the State, in accord with an ex post facto action of the RI Assembly in 1842. Dorr had been tried by a court packed with his enemies, men who had prejudged the case, Further, Dorr had been prevented from admitting evidence important to his argument, There were further violations of Dorr’s 6th Amendment constitutional rights. New Hampshire goes on to substantiate in specific detail its charges against Rhode Island and to order the sending of this report to the governors of all the States and Territories and to its own members of Congress. Minor soft crease at upper corner near foredge. Else Very Good.
Price: $175.00

5322
Miller, Elizabeth W. (Editor).- The Negro in America. A Bibliography.

Cambridge, MA.. Harvard University Press.. 1968. 190 pp. 8vo. Paper Wraps. Fourth Printing. Foreword by Thomas F. Pettigrew. Published for the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. An important bibliography of Black Americana. Mild soiling of cover. Else,Very Good.
Price: $24.00

8318
Jameson, J. Franklin (Editor).- Correspondence of John C. Calhoun, in Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1899, Volume II.

House of Representatives Document No.733, 56th Congress, 1st Session. Washington, DC. Government Printing Office. 1900. 1218 pp. 8vo. Green Publisher's Cloth. First Edition. The entire extant correspondence to and from John C. Calhoun, the great Senator from South Carolina in the critical period up to his death in 1850. Numerous references to the important events and issues of the time including the issue of slavery in the South and in the new territories of the United States, issues that were to lead to the Civil War. Ex Libris, with few markings. Covers abraded. Hinges cracked internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

11376
Lossing, Benson J. (Editor).- The Diary of George Washington, from 1789 to 1791; Embracing the Opening of the First Congress, and His Tours through New England, Long Island and the Southern States, together with His Journal of a Tour to the Ohio, in 1753.

New York. Charles B. Richardson & Co. 1860. 248 pp. 12mo. Albumen photograph of a Washington image as frontispiece with tissue guard. Light brown publisher's cloth covered boards, ruled in the blind on both covers. Gilt titling on spine with gilt rulings. T.e.g. Yellow end papers. First Edition. Howes 132. Howes reports this volume as quite scarce. According to Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig,The Diaries of George Washington, (Univ. VA. Press), The Diaries are more the record of daily events in Washington╒s life than records of his personal feelings. The latter, however, he did express in his letters. They give a true and fascinating look into the life of this busy man. Ex libris, with only library stamp (canceled) on title page. Shelving number on label on spine and written in ink on front free end paper. Wear at ends of spine. Cracks in cloth over spine, repaired. Corners bumped. Rear hinge starting. Frontipiece and end paper, on which it is laid down, separating. Slight toning of page margins. Else, Good +.
Price: $165.00

11415
Gammell, Prof. William.- Sketch of the Educational and Other Benefactions of the Late Hon. Nicholas Brown. Reprinted from Barnard's American Journal of Education for June, 1857.

N.P. [Hartford, CT] The American Journal of Education. 1857. 26 pp. 8vo. Frontispiece portrait of Nicholas Brown. Tan printed paper wraps. Sewn First Edition. A memoir, written by Professor William Gammell of Brown University, of the ancestry and good works of Nicholas Brown, scion of the family dating in America from 1636. He was the son of Nicholas Brown, one of the four brothers who strongly influenced the course of the history of Rhode Island and Brown University through their mercantile and beneficent activities. The younger Nicholas Brown continued these activities, forming a new mercantile house, Brown & Ives, which engaged in the China Trade, among others. He helped form the Providence Athenaeum, the First Baptist Church in America and The Butler Hospital for the Insane; he supported Brown University magnanimously, contributing 3 buildings and much land among other gifts; he was a supporter of Providence╒s poor and the community itself in many ways and contributed to many religious, charitable and educational institutions outside of Rhode Island. The American Journal of Education was originally published as The American Journal of Education and College Review, edited by Absalom Peters and Henry Barnard, the noted reformer of education, in 1855. After issuing v. 1, no. 1-2 (Aug. 1855-Jan. 1856), the partnership dissolved, with Peters continuing the original publication, and Barnard establishing the American journal of education. Inscribed by John Carter Brown Woods (1851╨1930), Great Grandson of Nicholas Brown William Gammell (1812╨89) was Professor of English Literature, of History and Political Economy at Brown in the mid-nineteenth century Wear along foredge of spine at foot. Small chip and stains near edges. Crease at corner of rear cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $150.00

11417
Arnold, Stephen H.- Seventy-Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Directors of the Providence Athenaeum to the Corporation. Submitted September 25, 1911.

Providence, RI. Snow & Farnham Company. 1911. 83 pp. 8vo. Illustrated. Tan printed paper wraps. First Edition. An interesting review of the history of the Providence Athenaeum, one of the oldest private libraries in America, from its beginnings to 1911. The historical review details the early merger of the Providence Library Company (1753╨1836) and the old Athenaeum(1831╨36). There is a plate of an engraving of the Providence Arcade, which housed the older library and the new one (1836╨present) after the merger. The frontispiece is a photograph of the new Athenaeum building (1838╨present). In addition to the history, which includes anecdotes about Edgar Allen Poe and Sarah Helen Whitman, there is a list of Benefactors, Proprietors and Subscribers of the Athenaeum, Including historically illustrious citizens of Providence and elsewhere. Commentary is provided on the acquisitions of books, artworks, etc. A fascinating account of one of the great private libraries of 19th and 20th century America. Tiny chip from lower right corner of covers. One cm. separation at top hinge of front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

11333
Emerson, R[alph] W[aldo].- An Address Delivered in the Court-House in Concord, Massachusetts, on 1st August, 1844, on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies. Published by Request.

Boston. MA. James Munroe and Company. 1844. First Edition. 34 pp. 8vo. Sewn. Disbound. A famous address, in which Emerson, with his usual eloquence and clarity, develops his opposition to the institution of slavery. Logical and unequivocal, he has trouble restraining the force of his opposition to supporters of slavery. Emerson incisively draws the relevant connections to slavery in America with no equivocation. Lacks outer wraps. Minimal foxing and stains, and moderate toning of title page. Else, Very Good
Price: $200.00

7415
[Howe, Julia Ward].- Battle-Hymn of the Republic. In The Atlantic Monthly. A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics. February, 1862, p.145. Vol IX. No. LII. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1862. First Edition. 1 p. 8vo. Yellowish tan printed paper wraps, as issued. Lomazow 645c. BAL 9416A. First printing of the poem by Julia Ward Howe, a ringing endorsement of abolition early in the Civil War, in the single whole issue of Atlantic Monthly for February, 1862. (Note printing error on contents page, back of front cover, referring to No. LI). Bound in is Atlantic Monthly ad for a new romance, "John Brent" by Theodore Winthrop. The “Battle-Hymn of the Republic” was written in one night early in the War, near Washington, then under attack.(ref.: Howe, “Reminiscences: 1819–1899”, p. 275). The poem became one of the most illustrious hymns in the English language. Quite uncommon in single issue. Lower half of back cover missing. Soiling of edges of front cover. Small tears at edges of covers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $750.00

11278
Jones, Dolores Blythe.- An “Oliver Optic” Checklist. An Annotated Catalog- Index to the Series, Non-Series Stories, and Magazine Publications of William Taylor Adams Westport, CT. Greenwood Press. 1985. First Edition 181 pp. 8vo. Red publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine and front cover. An annotated catalogue of “Oliver Optic’s” works. As New.
Price: $38.00

11287
[Broadside Songsheet]. [Foster, Stephen C.].- Nelly Was A Lady. Philadelphia, PA. Thomas M. Scroggy. N.D. [ca. 1855] First Edition. 1 p. 14.3 cm. W x 22.8 cm. H. Loose sheet, as issued. Ref.: Wolf, “American Song Sheets Slip Ballads and Poetical Broadsides, LCP, #1570c. Whittlesey & Sonnek, Stephen Foster, p.36. A Stephen Foster dialect song, first published in 1849 by Firth & Pond. Here, published as a song sheet broadside by Thomas M. Scroggy of Philadelphia (at 443 Vine St.). Scroggy was a noted printer and publisher of song sheets, along with De Marsan and others. The text is enclosed by a type ornament border characteristic of Scroggy. Thomas M. Scroggy possibly served in the Civil War,in the Pennsylvania Militia Infantry, 45th Regiment, Company H (as a Thomas M. Scroggy is recorded in Samuel Penniman Bates, “History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861–65”, Volume 5, Part 2, p.1280, 1871). Scroggy’s publishing business was recorded in the Philadelphia directories for 1852–57. Recorded initially at 443 Vine St., he later (after the Civil War moved to 1229 Vine as a wholesale agent and, yet later, ca. 1884, was noted to be at 1232 Vine St. as a stationer. Of interest, a note in “The American Bookseller, Vol. XVI, No. 8, p. 412, October 15, 1884 (published by the American Book Trade Association) reports the arrest on October 3 of Thomas M. Scroggy for selling obscene photographs and literature. His arrest “was made at the instance of Anthony Comstock and S. G. Oram, agents of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, who secured with the prisoner a box full of obscene photographs and about twelve indecent books”. Comstock (1844–1915) was the notorious enemy of vice and obscenity who had persuaded the U.S. Congress in 1873 to pass the Comstock Law which made illegal the delivery or transportation of “obscene, lewd or lascivious” material as well as methods or information on birth control. Comstock later called G. B. Shaw an “Irish smut dealer” and alerted the New York police to the content of Shaw’s play, “Mrs Warren’s Profession. Shaw in turn called such behavior “Comstockery”, using a term originally coined by the New York Times in 1895. Toned at edges. Few spot of foxing. 2 tiny chips from each of two edges. Else, Very Good.
Price: $65.00

11288
[Broadside Songsheet]. [William Donaldson]- I’m Off for Charleston. Philadelphia, PA. Thomas M. Scroggy. N.D. [ca. 1855] First Edition. 1 p. 15.7 cm. W x 20.8 cm. H. Loose sheet, as issued. Ref.: Wolf, “American Song Sheets Slip Ballads and Poetical Broadsides, LCP, #1021f. A dialect song, here, published as a song sheet broadside by Thomas M. Scroggy of Philadelphia (at 443 Vine St.). Words and music are by William Donaldson, first published in 1850 by Firth, Pond Co. of New York.(website of Lester Levy Collection at Johns Hopkins). Scroggy was a noted printer and publisher of song sheets, along with De Marsan and others. The text is enclosed by a type ornament border characteristic of Scroggy. Thomas M. Scroggy possibly served in the Civil War,in the Pennsylvania Militia Infantry, 45th Regiment, Company H (as a Thomas M. Scroggy is recorded in Samuel Penniman Bates, “History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861–65”, Volume 5, Part 2, p.1280, 1871). Scroggy’s publishing business was recorded in the Philadelphia directories for 1852–57. Recorded initially at 443 Vine St., he later (after the Civil War moved to 1229 Vine as a wholesale agent and, yet later, ca. 1884, was noted to be at 1232 Vine St. as a stationer. Of interest, a note in “The American Bookseller, Vol. XVI, No. 8, p. 412, October 15, 1884 (published by the American Book Trade Association) reports the arrest on October 3 of Thomas M. Scroggy for selling obscene photographs and literature. His arrest “was made at the instance of Anthony Comstock and S. G. Oram, agents of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, who secured with the prisoner a box full of obscene photographs and about twelve indecent books”. Comstock (1844–1915) was the notorious enemy of vice and obscenity who had persuaded the U.S. Congress in 1873 to pass the Comstock Law which made illegal the delivery or transportation of “obscene, lewd or lascivious” material as well as methods or information on birth control. Comstock later called G. B. Shaw an “Irish smut dealer” and alerted the New York police to the content of Shaw’s play, “Mrs Warren’s Profession. Shaw in turn called such behavior “Comstockery”, using a term originally coined by the New York Times in 1895. Only a few spots of foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $65.00

11289
[Broadside Songsheet]. [Foster, Stephen C.].- Uncle Ned, as Sung by De Colored Society in General. N.P. N.Pub. N.D. [ca. 1850] First Edition. 1 p. 10.8 cm. W x 19.3 cm. H. Loose sheet, as issued. Ref.: Wolf, “American Song Sheets Slip Ballads and Poetical Broadsides, LCP, 2389.d. Whittlesey & Sonnek, Stephen Foster, p42. A Stephen Foster dialect song, first published in 1848 by Stephen C. Foster with the copyright assigned to W. E. Millet of New York. It was promptly published again for Foster by W. C. Peters in Louisville. Another early publication of the song was probably a piracy from Foster, in 1848 as well. It was published in Baltimore by F. D. Benteen, allegedly arranged by R. O. Wilson with no mention of Foster. Whittlesee & Sonneck consider it a poor arrangement of Foster’s song. for only half of Foster’s song is remembered correctly. The original was written and composed for Wm. Roark of the Sable Harmonists, a noted minstrel troupe. Here, “Uncle Ned” (originally “Old Uncle Ned”) is published as a song sheet broadside by an unidentified publisher. The first line of the song and the last line of the chorus have been bowdlerized by the substitution of the word “Darkie” for the epithet “nigga”, likely an interesting example of 19th century racial sensitivity... 2 chips from head of broadside, not encroaching on text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $65.00

11290
[Pamphlet]. Emmons, Nathanael, D.D.- A Discourse Delivered on the National Thanksgiving, April 13, 1815. Dedham, MA. Printed at the Gazette Office. 1815. First Edition. 19 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wrap. Stab sewn. and stapled. An interesting sermon, relevant to our day, on the occasion of the end of the War of 1812, by Nathanael Emmons (1745–1840), Yale graduate, long-time pastor of the Church in Franklin, MA, and brother-in-law of Jonathan Edwards, with whom he studied for his ordination. Nominally Congregationalist, he was an ally of Samuel Hopkins in Hopkinsianism, a variant of Calvinism preaching “disinterested benevolence”. Hopkins was an early abolitionist in Newport, RI, arguing in 1776 for emancipation. Here Emmons argues, from Jeremiah, that leaders must arise from amongst the people. Choosing one’s own rulers is a privilege, originating among the Jews. The American elective system is similarly unique. George Washington was among the few who knew their power was given by the people and derived from the character of the people. A people gain from electing men with political knowledge and skill in uniting the disparate views of their constituents, thus uniting the body politic. A people must appoint men of integrity, the first virtue of a civil ruler. The system of elections from among the people maximizes the chance of electing men of integrity. To behave so, the people must have useful knowledge and be kept from ignorance. Good rulers will husband the resources of the nation, which come from taxation and protect the people’s property. By avoiding unjust or unnecessary wars, good rulers protect the lives of their people. Choosing the best men to manage their best interests from amongst themselves is the greatest blessing, the sum of civic privileges. On the then current arrival of peace (the War of 1812) Emmons attributes the war to the mismanagement and failures of Thomas Jefferson. He claims that the election of such a ruler is the fault of the people, who abdicated their intrinsic power in electing him. Often, in history, when that happens, the people themselves are corrupt and get what they deserve. Now that peace has come, the people must reform and elect from among themselves only the best rulers. Tucked in is a clipping from a Franklin MA newspaper from January 2, 1906 concerning a reception for Rev John Reid, the new minister of the Franklin Congregational Church. At the celebration a poem, a parody of Edgar A. Poe’s “The Raven”, entitled “The New Minister” was read by C. B. Johnson. In it, the author refers to Rev. “Dr. Emmons, quaint but mighty, well equipped to put to flight a Legion, yea, and more, of evil men; Twenty-nine he did confess to, and his people did their best to Make him feel that youth was what was needed then. Would we had more, just his like again.” Toned. Staples rusting. Corner lost from upper free edge of last leaf, without encroaching upon text. Else, Very good.
Price: $150.00

11210
Laws of the State of Vermont; Revised and Passed by the Legislature, in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety Seven. Together with The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution of the United States, with Its Amendments, and the Constitution of Vermont. With an Appendix: Containing the Several Laws, which Have Heretofore Been Passed by the Legislature Regulating Proprietors’ Meetings, Granting General Land Taxes, Exclusive Privileges to Companies for Locks, Toll Bridges, Turnpike Roads, &c. And the Titles of All the Acts Which Have Not Been Repealed, or Become Obsolete. Single Volume 2 [only] of 2 Vols. Rutland, VT. State of Vermont. Printed by Josiah Fay. 1798. First Edition. Pp. 407–621, 1–205, (2 pp. errata) 8vo. Contemporary calf over boards. Black calf label, titled in gilt on spine Evans 34925. Sabin 99126. A compendium of the laws of Vermont, compiled toward the end of the eighteenth century, probably the first major compendium of the laws of that state after admission to the Union. This is only one volume of two, the second. The text block is in Very Good condition with a short index neatly inscribed in ink by a contemporary owner on the front free flyleaf and the printed Index similarly inscribed with beginning and ending phrases on each page. There are several brief annotations in ink throughout the text.Among the many Acts passed are that which established the militia of the State of Vermont and the regulations by which it operated, including universal service for males aged 18 to 45; Acts establishing the modes of election of Representatives and Senators from Vermont to the Congress of the United States; an Act (passed in 1791) establishing the University of Vermont in Burlington, the fifth college established in New England (after Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth and Brown). This charter for the University was enacted in the same year that Vermont was admitted to the Union as a State. By some measures, this is the second oldest state university in the country (barely younger than the University of North Carolina). Slight worming of pastedowns. Wear of covers at head of spine and at corners. Mild toning and off-setting. hinges worn, but intact, with 1” separation at head of front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

11215
Flannagan, Roy C.- The Story of Lucky Strike. N.P. Privately Published. 1938. Illustrated. First Edition. 94 pp. Small 8vo. Tan embossed publisher’s cloth with paper label and ruling on front cover. Wrappers embossed in the blind with the Trilon and Perisphere, New York World’s Fair, 1939 Privately printed to benefit the American Tobacco Company on the occasion of their exhibit at the New York World’s Fair , in 1939. An effort to surround the smoking of tobacco with romance and entice with technological mystique. Very Good to Near Fine.
Price: $65.00

11266
Toombs, R[obert Augustus].- A Lecture Delivered in the Tremont Temple, Boston, Massachusetts, on the 24th January, 1856, by R. Toombs. Slavery –– Its Constitutional Status –– Its Influence on the African Race and Society. [Washington, ?GA]. [Printed by J. T. and L. Towers] [1856] First Edition. 16 pp. 8vo. Self wraps. Pleasant E. Stovell, “Robert Toombs: Statesman, Speaker, Soldier”, Cassell, 1862 (http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/26069). Afro-Americana, LCP/LPHS 10337. Robert Toombs (1810–85) was a prominent American political leader, U. S. Senator from Georgia, the first Secretary of State for the Confederacy and a Confederate General in the Civil War. Thrown out of The University of Georgia for conduct in a card-playing incident, he attended Union College in Schenectady, NY for his degree and the University of Virginia Law School. His “genial character, proclivity for entertainment, and unqualified success on the legal circuit earned him the admiration of his fellow Georgians.”. He was elected to the US House of Representatives and his views, together with those of Alexander Stephens “defined and articulated Georgia’s position on national issues in the middle decades of the 19th century”; he was a states’ rights partisan and a Whig. He became US Senator from Georgia from 1853–61, as a Democrat (Wikipedia) Although initially against secession, Toombs was an activist pro-slavery Senator, a racist, always promoting the expansion of that institution into the territories and prospective new states. On Lincoln’s election in 1860, he converted into an ardent secessionist. With the election of Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederacy, Toombs’s ambition for that position was frustrated. He formed an opposition, but then resigned as Secretary of State for the Confederacy and was appointed a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army. Wounded at Antietem, he left the Army and joined the Georgia Militia. With the end of the Confederacy, he escaped to Cuba, London and Paris. Toombs returned to the US in 1867, but as an unreconstructed Southerner, he never asked for a pardon, thus never regained citizenship. He did practice law and dominated the Georgia Constitutional Convention of 1877. Toombs is still celebrated in Georgia, having named for him a town and a county and his home is an “historic site”. This pamphlet is a pro-slavery screed, delivered by Toombs in the heart of abolitionist country in 1856. He argues that Congress must protect unlimited slavery as an institution and that slavery is best for the slave as well as the whole society. His argument is based upon what Toombs calls a natural law of justice. It is clear to him that “the white race is the superior race, and the black the inferior”. He reviews the history of the articles of the US Constitution permitting slavery and adopts a strongly states rights position regarding its continuance. Attempts to change the rules for new territories is a violation of our history and the Constitution. As to the inferiority of Blacks, Toombs uses as evidence the history of slavery in Africa, the inadequacy of Blacks in Jamaica to form a stable society after emancipation there, the social failure of Blacks in the North, the well-being of slaves in the South and his ideas of a market economy’s conflict between labor and capital. Government has no right to interfere with prosperity coming from “individual efforts of an enlightened, moral, energetic and religious [Southern] people”. We have found that the pamphlet exists in two printed forms (no priority yet determined), not noted in its cataloguing or its bibliographical references. This is clear by comparison of a copy revealed in .pdf format at http://www.archive.org/stream/lecturedelivered00toom#page/n1/mode/2up and the copy offered here (also the copy cited at http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1856-slavery-lecture-by-r-toombs-tremont-temple, whose p. 1 image is precisely as our copy is detailed, whereas the whole .pdf copy cited above has been printed differently). The text is identical in both, with minor changes in format. Uncommon. Ex libris. Faint library stamp at foot of p.16. Leaves 1/2 and 15/16 detached. Folded twice horizontally with wear at folds on leaf 15/16 and with small holes along folds and loss of some letters along folds. Toning. Good.
Price: $375.00

11174
Frieze, Jacob.- A Concise History, of the Efforts to Obtain an Extension of Suffrage in Rhode Island; from the Year 1811 to 1842. Providence. Benjamin F . Moore. 1842. First Edition. 171 pp. 12mo. Buff printed paper wraps. Tan glazed linen spine. Tucked in is a nicely printed contemporary paper label, 3-1/2” x 2-1/8”, for “Cheap and Substantial Book-Binding, at J. W. Roots, Providence, R. I. ” in a printed border. Bartlett, p. 129. Heard & Hamsa, Bookman's Guide to Americana (9th Ed.),p. 160. Park, RI Biblio., #363. Refs.: Gettleman, "The Dorr Rebellion". Sabin 25966. Jacob Frieze was an anti-Dorr pamphleteer, who had, in fact, voted for the People's Constitution in December, 1841, under the impression that it was an opinion without binding force. This volume is accepted as the standard Law & Order account of the Dorr Rebellion. Foxed. Mild wear to linen spine. Soiling of cover. Mild foxing and toning of text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

11172
Goddard, William G[iles].- An Address to the People of Rhode-Island, Delivered in Newport, on Wednesday, May 3, 1843, in Presence of the General Assembly, on the Occasion f the Change in Civil Government of Rhode-Island, by the Adoption of the Constitution. Which Superseded the Charter of 1663. Providence, RI. Knowles and Vose, Printers. 1843. First Edition. 80 pp. 8vo. Self wraps. Disbound. Sewn and stapled. Refs.: Gettlman, The Dorrr Rebellion, Random House, 1973. Sabin 27647. Am Imp 43-2120. DiSimone & Schofield, Broadsides of the Dorr Rebellion, 183. William G. Goddard was Professor of Moral Philosophy at Brown University (also a legislator and journalist). He bases his argument on a respect for the rule of law. . Under the pseudonym of ”Town Born”, he wrote articles in the Providence Journal ridiculing Thomas Dorr and other leaders of the reform efforts to extend suffrage to the many who did not hold property and who were behind the People’s convention to extend suffrage through a People’s Constitution. (Gettleman, 45n). Brown University, led by President Francis Wayland and William Goddard, was a center of anti-Dorr sentiment. Goddard supported the aged James Fenner as head of the Law and Order Coalition in the extreme anti-Dorr position. {Gettleman, 152n). This pamphlet is a stirring address by Goddard to the people of Rhode Island, supporting the new constitution of 1843 ending the rebellion advocating major change of suffrage in that state. Dorr fled to New Hampshire and was later captured, tried for treason and imprisoned. Mild foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $185.00

11171
[Sheet Music]. Sargent, Epes (Words), and Dempster, William R. (Composer).- The Death of Warren, A National Song Written by Epes Sargent, Esq. The Music Composed and Most Respectfully Dedicated to His Friend Abraham R. Thompson, M.D. of Charlestown, Mass. by William R. Dempster. Boston. Oliver Ditson. 1845. Cover lithograph by J. H. Bufford & Co's Lith of Boston. 11 pp. Fo. Disbound. Illustrated and decorated lithographed cover DAB (for Sargent). Appl.Cyc.Am.Biog (for Dempster). BAL 17211, 17216. Groce and Wallace (for Bufford). Peters, America on Stone, 118-27 (for Bufford). On the cover is a beautiful image of Joseph Warren lying in the throes of death at the battle of Bunker Hill, in a lithograph after the famous 1786 painting of that scene by John Trumbull (in the collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society).. The image shows English soldiers and officers as well as minutemen surrounding Warren. the text quotes Warren's persistent refrain, "'Tis sweet to die for our country." The verses appeared in "Mr. Dempster's Ballad Soirées" (?1839, 1844). Epes Sargent (1813-80) was a journalist, poet, dramatist and energetic collaborator of S. G. Goodrich in the Peter Parley volumes. Later in life he was a devotee of Spiritualism. The composer, Willaim Richardson Dempster (1809_71) was born in Scotland and died in London. A naturalized citizen of the United States, he was a successful composer and singer. His specialty was music set for the songs of Tennyson's longer poems. John H. Bufford was a lithographer and publisher of prints. After 4 years in New York, he moved to Boston in 1839, later becoming associated with B. W. Thayer & Co. till 1844, when he started his own firm. He did a rare view of Princeton University and many town views as well as great whaling scenes. His work had an enormous range. Winslow Homer was his apprentice, 1855-57. Few spots of foxing and mild toning of edges. Owner’s signature and modest stamp of Frances C. Smith at head of front cover. Else, Very Good .
Price: $170.00

11169
Parsons, Charles W.- Report on the Medical Topography and Epidemic Diseases of Rhode Island. Extracted from the Transactions of the American Medical Association. Philadelphia. Collins, Printer. 1864. First Edition. 27 pp. 8vo. Grey printed paper wraps. C. W. Parsons, M.D.(1823_after 1882), was the son of Usher Parsons, the illustrious naval physician and historian of the Battle of Lake Erie in the War of 1812, a memoir of whom was published by his son, a professor at Brown and an active member of the Rhode Island Historical Society. Parsons begins this essay with a discussion of the geography, the geology and the climate of Rhode Island. He draws inferences about the effect of these factors on the incidence and distribution of various, chiefly infectious, diseases. The influence of population growth and the high rate of immigration on death rates from these diseases is also considered. The very high death rates for several of the diseases was astonishing, epidemic typhus, in one community, resulting in 25% of the local population being lost to this disorder in less than six months. Small chips from margins of wraps. Sine chipped away. Mild age toning. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

11167
Anonymous.- Reward of Merit, Public School #15, Brooklyn, NY. Granted to Henry J. Bragg, 1st Class as an honorable testimony of approbation for Industry, Punctua;ity and Good Condct during the last Month. July 15, 1864. Signed by S. G. Taylor, Principal. Brooklyn, NY. Brooklyn Public Schools Department. 1864. Illustrated with unsigned engraving of a young boy on horseback watering his horse in a stream, with his dog standing by. With an elaborate border and interesting typefaces. First Edition. 1 p. 5-1/4” H x 8Ó”W. Loose sheet, as issued. A lovely Civil War period broadside, issued by the Brooklyn, NY, Public Schools to a young student. A Reward of Merit in testimony of approbation. for industry, punctuality and good conduct. Decorated with a very good engraving, an elaborate border and various well-done typefaces. Tiny chips at corners, in border only. Mild toning. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $250.00

6303
Barnum, Phineas T[aylor].- The Life of P. T. Barnum Written by Himself. New York. Redfield. 1855. Illustrated with wood engravings. Frontispiece portrait of Barnum. First Edition. 404 pp. + 4 pp. publisher’s catalogue. 12mo. Original purplish brown publisher’s cloth. Covers ruled in the blind. Titled in gilt on spine. T.e.g. Sabin 3564. Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810–1881) was America’s premier showman of the nineteenth century. This is the earliest edition of his memoir, incorporating details of his relationship with Tom Thumb, Jenny Lind et al. Front hinge separated between copyright page and Preface. Wear at ends of spine with fading. Shaken. Foxing of endpapers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

6465
Cooper, Brevet Captain S.- A Concise System of Instructions and Regulations for the Militia and Volunteers of the United States, Comprehending the Exercises and Movements of the Infantry, Light Infantry, and Riflemen; Cavalry and Artillery; Together with the Manner of Doing Duty in Philadelphia. Robert P. DeSilver. 1836. Numerous illustrations. First Edition 282 pp. + 4 pp. recommendations. 12mo. Brown publisher’s cloth. Printed paper label on spine. Am. Imp. 36933. A substantial manual of military manoeuvres and drills. It may be built upon Winfield Scott’s “Abstract of Infantry Tactics” of 1830. Each of the four parts is also separately paginated: 128, 48, 35, 70 pp. A large number of pages of drum beats and bugle calls are included. 4 pages of endorsements at rear. Owner’s signature in ink on front pastedown and on title page. Supervising Major Gen. Alexander Macomb also wrote on Courts Martial. Label abraded. Mild wear at ends of spine. Foxing. Mildlly shaken.Else, Very Good.
Price: $325.00

6878
[Lester, Charles Edwards].- The Life of Sam Houston. (The Only Authentic Memoir of Him Ever Published.). New York. J. C. Derby. 1855. 10 plates, including 3 maps and a frontispiece portrait of Houston, designed by J[acob A.]. Dallas and engraved by N[athaniel] Orr. Tissue guards Second Edition. 402 pp. + 6 pp. publisher’s ads at rear. Brown publisher’s cloth. Blindstamped decoration of cover. Gilt titling on spine Howes L271. Sabin 33191. Raines, p.225. Groce & Wallace, pp. 162 (for Dallas) and 479 (for Orr) First 262 pages previously published as “Sam Houston and His Republic” in 1846. This edition with added material published likely as a campaign biography for Houston for the US Presidency. As an inexpensive, rushed book, it has suffered in condition.Jacob Dallas (1825–57), originally from Philadelphia, was a painter and book illustra tor in NY. Orr , in the 1850’s, was one of the leading wood engravers in America. Cover much faded. Spine disintegrating. Shaken. Mild tidal staining and foxing. Lower corners torn from rear end papers. Overall Poor to Fair.
Price: $95.00

10606
Barnum, P[hineas] T[aylor].- Struggles and Triumphs: or, Forty Years’ Recollections of P. T. Barnum. Written by Himself. Hartford. J. B. Burr & Company. 1870. Illustrated by Fay and Cox, of New York. Full page wood engraved plates. Frontispiece portrait of Barnum. First Edition (? Second Printing). 780 pp. + 2 pp. publisher’s ads at rear. 8vo. Full tan contemporary calf with black leather labels on spine, lettered in gilt. The later version of P. T. Barnum’s (1810–1891) autobiography, which he revised throughout his subsequent life. His tome is revealing of many of his ups and downs, the Jenny Lind sponsorship, General Tom Thumb, commentary on noted producers, actors and prominent people of his days, bankruptcy of his American Museum, etc. A fascinating account and a revealing saga of 19th century theatrical and social life. Hinges starting at foot. Wear at foot of spine. Foxing of frontispiece and its tissue guard. Offsetting of frontispiece to title page. Mild water stain on end papers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $110.00

11099
[Brady, Matthew].- Wedding Portrait of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Stratton (General Tom Thumb and Wife) after a Photograph by Matthew Brady. The Cover of Harper’s Weekly. A Journal of Civilization, Vol. VII, No. 321, New York, Saturday, February 21, 1863. With Facsimile Signatures. New York. Harper & Brothers. 1863. Illustrated. First Edition. 2 pp. Fo. Disbound. The wedding portrait of General Tom Thumb and his wife, Lavinia Warren Stratton, after a photograph taken by Matthew Brady. Detailed text on p. 2 vividly describes the guests and the event. Tom Thumb was near retirement after a celebrated career. Lavinia Warren was 20 years old, stood 32 inches tall and also worked for P. T. Barnum, who attended the wedding along with Commodore Nutt and Minnie Warren, sister of the bride. Nutt, still shorter than Tom Thumb, was also a veteran of show business. The wedding took place in Grace Church in Manhattan and was reported in detail by the New York Herald. A few closed tears and small chips at margins. Small stain in right margin. Else Very Good.
Price: $95.00

6639
Garland, Hugh A.- The Life of John Randolph of Roanoke. Two Volumes. New York. D. Appleton & Co. 1851. Portrait Frontispiece in Each Volume. ? First Edition. 311 pp., 375 pp. + publisher’s ads in each volume, at rear. 12mo. Purple Publisher's Cloth. The Biography of an Important Virginia Planter, a Relative of Thomas Jefferson. Randolph Freed His Slaves by His Will in 1823-33. Covers & spines faded. Spine ends slightly worn. Penciled number notations on one blank endpaper. of Vol. II. Mild foxing at end of Vol. II. Otherwise, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

10997
Morison, Samuel Eliot.- Admiral of the Ocean Sea. A Life of Christopher Columbus. Maps by Erwin Raisz. Drawings by Bertram Green. Boston, MA. An Atlantic Monthly Press Book. Little, Brown and Co. 1942. Frontispiece portrait of Columbus. Maps, charts and illustrations Reprint Edition, First Printing. One Volume Edition 680 pp. 8vo. Reddish publisher’s cloth, titled on spine. Image of a compass rose on front cover. Top edge stained blue. End papers a map of the Carribean Sea area, with lands discovered by Columbus heavily outlined. Title page printed in red and black. No D.J. The first printing of the Atlantic Monthly book club edition of this great historical examination and recreation of Columbus’s voyages to the Caribbean and Americas. Identical to the original two-volume edition, except for the omission of the notes and heavily navigational data and an abrigement of the chapters on Ships and Sailing and the origin and spread of syphilis, As noted in the Preface, otherwise the two issues are identical. Complete with Book Club notes tucked in. Spine slightly sunned. Minimal bumping of corners. Else, Very Good +.
Price: $60.00

11003
[Sheet Music]. The Duncan Sisters(Words and Music).- I Never Had a Mammy. Thomas Wilkes Presents the Duncan Sisters (By Arrangement wth Sam H. Harris). In “Topsy and Eva”. Book by Catherine C. Cushing (Suggested by “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” - Harriet Beecher Stowe). New York. Irving Berlin, Inc. 1923. Illustrated cover with front image of the Duncan Sisters, one in blackface (Topsy), kneeling behind a seated Eva. First Edition. 5 pp. !2 1/4 ” H X 9 1/4” W. Illustrated cover. Ad for “Rememb’ring” with music on rear cover. http://utc.iath.virginia.edu/sitemap.html A song from an early 20th century musical comedy version of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”, called “Topsy and Eva”, with the songs written by the Duncan Sisters, who starred in the production. Topsy, as expected, is in blackface. The White Sisters took over the roles when the play moved from its original venue in San Francisco to Los Angeles. The production was a big hit and the songs recorded by Victor. There was a revival in Los Angeles, again with the Duncan Sisters in 1942. Catherine Cushing (1874–1952) was a songwriter as well as a playwright and librettist. Some of her work was produced in film. She was a collaborator with Rudolf Friml, among others. The film of “Topsy and Eva” was released in Finland in 1927, directed by Del Lord with additional scenes by D. W. Griffith, starring Rosetta (1894–1959) (as Topsy) and Vivian (1897–1986) (as Eva) Duncan. The Duncan Sisters had a prominent vaudevillian career, beginning in 1911, as well as their many stage appearances, movies (quite comedic. but with only modest box-office success) and night club appearances. They even appeared on TV. Lower right corner chipped, with minor loss, not involving text or image. Hinge separating. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

11004
[Sheet Music]. The Duncan Sisters(Words and Music).- Do Re Mi. Thomas Wilkes Presents the Duncan Sisters (By Arrangement wth Sam H. Harris). In “Topsy and Eva”. Book by Catherine C. Cushing (Suggested by “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” - Harriet Beecher Stowe). New York. Irving Berlin, Inc. 1923. Illustrated cover with front image of the Duncan Sisters, one in blackface (Topsy), kneeling behind a seated Eva. First Edition. 5 pp. !2 1/4 ” H X 9 1/4” W. Illustrated cover. Ad for “Rememb’ring” with music on rear cover. http://utc.iath.virginia.edu/sitemap.html A song from an early 20th century musical comedy version of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”, called “Topsy and Eva”, with the songs written by the Duncan Sisters, who starred in the production. Topsy, as expected, is in blackface. The White Sisters took over the roles when the play moved from its original venue in San Francisco to Los Angeles. The production was a big hit and the songs recorded by Victor. There was a revival in Los Angeles, again with the Duncan Sisters in 1942. Catherine Cushing (1874–1952) was a songwriter as well as a playwright and librettist. Some of her work was produced in film. She was a collaborator with Rudolf Friml, among others. The film of “Topsy and Eva” was released in Finland in 1927, directed by Del Lord with additional scenes by D. W. Griffith, starring Rosetta (1894–1959) (as Topsy) and Vivian (1897–1986) (as Eva) Duncan. The Duncan Sisters had a prominent vaudevillian career, beginning in 1911, as well as their many stage appearances, movies (quite comedic. but with only modest box-office success) and night club appearances. They even appeared on TV. Edges lightly chipped, with minor loss, not involving text or image. Few closed tears at edges. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

11020
[Broadside Verse].- Bob-Tailed Nag. [Philadelphia, PA] T. M. Scroggy. N.D. [1852–57] First Edition. 1 p. 5-1/8” W x 9-7/16”H. Broadside. Foster’s Plantation Melodies (Baltimore, F. D. Benteen; New Orleans, W. T. Mayo, 1850). Whittlesee & Sonneck, p. 100. Wolf, Lib. Company, American Song Sheets, 239b. A comic song in Afro-American Dialect, written in 1850 by Stephen Foster (1826–64). Its official title was “Gwine to Run All Night”. The text is enclosed in a decorative border. The “Camptown” of Foster’s experience was a ramshackle tent city for migrant workmen in Pennsylvania. The Camptown Races were a popular form of entertainment in the Camp. The song soon worked its way into popular culture. Scroggy was a Philadelphia publisher of broadside song sheets, similar to, but rarer than the prolific H. De Marsan of New York. Scroggy was listed at the address on the broadside in the period 1852–57 (AAS on-line catalogue). Right lower corner chipped off, far from text. Mild browning of edges. Else, Very Good.
Price: $95.00

11007
[Sheet Music]. The Duncan Sisters(Words and Music).- Rememb’ring. Thomas Wilkes Presents the Duncan Sisters (By Arrangement wth Sam H. Harris). In “Topsy and Eva”. Book by Catherine C. Cushing (Suggested by “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” - Harriet Beecher Stowe). New York. Irving Berlin, Inc. 1923. Illustrated cover with front image of the Duncan Sisters, one in blackface (Topsy), kneeling behind a seated Eva. First Edition. 5 pp. !2 1/4 ” H X 9 1/4” W. Illustrated cover. Ad for “Do Re Mi” with music on rear cover. http://utc.iath.virginia.edu/sitemap.html A song from an early 20th century musical comedy version of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”, called “Topsy and Eva”, with the songs written by the Duncan Sisters, who starred in the production. Topsy, as expected, is in blackface. The White Sisters took over the roles when the play moved from its original venue in San Francisco to Los Angeles. The production was a big hit and the songs recorded by Victor. There was a revival in Los Angeles, again with the Duncan Sisters in 1942. Catherine Cushing (1874–1952) was a songwriter as well as a playwright and librettist. Some of her work was produced in film. She was a collaborator with Rudolf Friml, among others. The film of “Topsy and Eva” was released in Finland in 1927, directed by Del Lord with additional scenes by D. W. Griffith, starring Rosetta (1894–1959) (as Topsy) and Vivian (1897–1986) (as Eva) Duncan. The Duncan Sisters had a prominent vaudevillian career, beginning in 1911, as well as their many stage appearances, movies (quite comedic. but with only modest box-office success) and night club appearances. They even lived to appear on TV. Very Good.
Price: $125.00

11022
Goddard, William G[iles].- An Address to the People of Rhode-Island, Delivered in Newport, on Wednesday, May 3, 1843, in Presence of the General Assembly, on the Occasion of the Change in the Civil Government of Rhode-Island, by Adoption of the Constitution, Which Superseded the Charter of 1663. Providence, RI. Knowles and Vose. 1843. First Edition. 80 pp. 8vo. Brown printed paper wraps. Sabin 27647. Am Imp 43-2120. Gettleman, 45n, 117n. DiSimone & Schofield, Broadsides of the Dorr Rebellion, 183. DAB (for Gardiner) A defense of the Constitutional Convention and the new “Freemen’s” constitution of Rhode Island against the People’s Convention (the Dorr Rebellion) by a professor of moral philosophy at Brown University (also a legislator and journalist). He bases his argument on a respect for the rule of law. Goddard elsewhere ridiculed the People’s Convention and Constitution in Providence Journal articles under the pseudonym “Town Born”. Goddard, along with President (of Brown) Francis Wayland, was a vigorous anti-Dorrite. This copy bears the notation: ”R. H. Gardiner, Esq. / With the Author’s respects”. Robert Hallowell Gardiner (1782–1864), was a distinguished resident of Maine, after whom the town of Gardiner, ME is named. He inherited a large estate on the Kennebec River from a maternal uncle, whose surname he adopted. A graduate of Harvard (1801), Gardiner became a scientific farmer and animal husbandman, founding a Lyceum to study and teach these skills, a precursor for A & M technical schools to come later. His maternal family was prominent in Aquidneck, Rhode Island, deeply involved in its public affairs. Gardiner, a trustee of Bowdoin College, was also president of the Maine Historical Society, from which this item was withdrawn. An error on p.77 is corrected in the author’s hand. Ex libris with withdrawal stamp. Spine reinforced with linen library tape. Mild soilingElse, Withdrawal stamp and two library numbers. Very Good.
Price: $175.00

8637
Drury, L[uke].- A Report of the Examination of Rev. Ephraim K. Avery, Charged with the Murder of Sarah Maria Cornell. N.P. [Providence, RI.] L. Drury. 1833. 64 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wraps. Stab sewn. Ref.:McDade 43. Mysteries of Crime, Ch. X. First Edition. This trial was held in Providence from May 6 to June 2, 1833. Sarah Connell was found hanging from a hay frame, an apparent suicide, in Tiverton, R.I.. She was 5 months pregnant and had left a note at home urging people to inquire of Rev. Avery in case she was missing. She had been a woman of ill-repute and had been repeatedly run out of town on charges of illicit consorting in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Avery was acquitted after a long trial with 196 witnesses. This report on the examination of Avery includes exerpts from significant other testimony. It also includes an Appendix. This issue corresponds with that described in the note to McDade 43, with additional material added to the text and the appendix beginning on p. 62. Owner's signature on cover: Wm. F. Mercer / Baltimore / Md. Lacks rear wrap. Else, Very Good
Price: $295.00

11030
[Broadside]. [Jacob Bigelow].- Harvard University.- Harvard College Order of Exercises for Commencement, August 27, 1806. Cambridge, MA. Wiliam Hilliard, Printer. 1806. First Edition. 1 p. 11-1/2” W x 18-1/4” H. As issued. DAB (for Bigelow). The program for Harvard University commencement, August, 1806. The order of exercises lists 13 orations by candidates (1–4 each) for the degree of Bachelor of Arts and 2 by candidates (1 each) for the degree of Master of Arts. There was to have been another degree candidate to have delivered an essay on “Originality”, but it is recorded on this program that “the melancholy event of his death prevented“ [”the discussion]. Penciled comments by the auditor express his approbation for 4 of the speakers. Among the latter is Jacob Bigelow, candidate for Bachelor of Arts, who delivered an English poem on “The Passions”, which the auditor criticized as being “a good poem too formally delivered-”. Bigelow (1787–1879) went on to become the distinguished Boston physician and botanist, who collected and systematically organized the flora of New England thoroughly. He authored “Florula Bostoniensis” in 1814, the standard manual for New England flora for over 30 years, “American Medical Botany“ (1817–20), the first “American Pharmacopoeia” (1820) and “Treatise on the Materia Medica” (1822). He was Professor of Materia Medica at Harvard from 1815 to 1855. Bigelow argued against excessive use of drugs and blood letting and lectured brilliantly on “Discourse on Self-Limited Diseases” (1835), much praised by Oliver Wendell Holmes. He also lectured on technology, served many public and professional roles, helped to found the Mount Auburn Cemetery and translated Mother Goose into Latin, which he published privately as “Chenodia”. His son, Dr. Henry Jacob Bigelow, himself a distinguished surgeon, reported in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal on the first general surgical procedure under ether anesthesia, the surgery carried out by Dr. John Collins Warren under anesthesia administered by William T. G. Morton. A tear along the left margin resulted in a small loss of the printed border and encroachment of a closed tear on two lines of the text. Two small spots of foxing. Penciled contemporary notations, as noted above. Else Very Good.
Price: $400.00

5015
Humboldt, Alexander de.- Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain.. With Physical Section and Maps, Founded on Astronomical Observations, and Trigonometrical and Barometrical Measurements. Volume I only (of Two). New York. I. Riley. 1811. Numerous tables. The American edition lacks the maps. First American Edition. 221 pp. 8vo. Contemporary full tree calf with decorated edges., . Originally publlished in France. The English and American editions, based on Black's translation, were both published in 1811. From about 1799 to 1804, Humboldt [1769-1859) toured extensively in Latin America, especially New Spain (Mexico) , making numerous scientific observations and accumulating much data on the customs, behavior, intellect and social arrangements of the indigenous population as well as investigating geographic, geologic, commercial and agricultural aspects of the society. He comments, moreover, on the political organization of that society. This is a milestone in exploration in that it set a standard for the new scientific exploration, testifying to Humboldt╒s rich intellect and capacity for critical analysis. Hinges cracked. Ex Libris (Miss Jordans' Circulating Library, Lancaster) with bookplate on front pastedown as only mark. Mild toning of some pages. Else, text block Very Good +.
Price: $225.00

6230
Anonymous.[? Blake, Alexander V.].- Anecdotes of the American Indians, Illustrating Their Eccentricities of Character. Hartford. C. M. Welles. 1850. Illustrated with full page frontispiece, vignette on title page and numerous wood engravings set as tailpieces Early Reprint Edition (copyright 1843). 252 pp. 12mo Red publisher's cloth, embossed in the blind. Gilt titling and decorations on spine. Not in Sabin. Not in Howes. AI 44-209 (1st Ed.). .By the Author of "Evenings in Boston" &"Ramon the Rover of Cuba"; [See Wright, I, 2088] &c. A contemporary analysis of the Native American character as illustrated by anecdotes of the time. Nice woodcuts and on pp. 12 ff a long poem with references to Andrew Jackson. Small waterstain on cover and early pages. Spine worn at hinges and ends. Corners worn . Else, Good +.
Price: $125.00

10902
Myers, Albert Cook.- The Boy George Washington, Aged 16. His Own Account of an Iroquois Indian Dance, 1748. In Commemoration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the birth of George Washington. 1732-1932. Philadelphia, PA. Albert Cook Myers. 1932. Illustrated. 79 pp. 12mo. Yellow publisher╒s cloth, titled and decorated in black on front cover and spine.. Illustrated D.J. A description of George Washington's trip over the western mountains as an apprentice surveyor, based upon his first journal. Grandly illustrated. Gives an account of an Indian dance observed in an encounter with the Iroquois. Inscribed by the author on copyright page in 1944 to Pusey Bancroft Heald and family in appreciation of their hospitality to him Damp stained D.J., extending to cover of book and preliminary pages. D.J. chipped, with closed tears on spine. Else, Book is Very Good.
Price: $45.00

10954
[Sheet Music]. Dodworth, Allen.- The Jenny Lind Polka. As Played by Dodworth's Cornet Band. Arranged by Allen Dodworth. Teacher of Dancing, 448 Broome St. New York. Firth, Hall & Pond. 1846. Engraved by Frc. Wakelam. First Edition. 2 pp. Fo. Unbound. Richard K. Hansen, The American Wind Band American band music had a grand development in the period of 1820-70. Allen Dodworth was one of the leaders of this movement, creating in 1848 a Cornet Band, an orchestra and a school of brass band instruments. Band musicians were feeders for the brass sections of symphonic orchestras in this period, helping symphonic music to develop. The year 1848 was a seminal year in the development of band music in America because of the great unrest in central Europe, causing band musicians to migrate in droves to America, many from Germany and some from Ireland. Joseph Gung-l came with his whole band in 1848. The Germania Musical Society came on an extended tour, 1848-55. Of this group, Carl Bergman taught Charles Ives's father harmony and counterpoint, undoubtedly thereby influencing the great and quixotic American composer, who incorporated so much American folk and band music into his symphonic works. Another immigrant was Patrick Sarsfield Gilmore who came in 1849 to conduct many brass bands. While working for P. T. Barnum, Gilmore developed a taste for superlatives, especially in promoting the tour of Jenny Lind, "The Swedish Nightingale", for Barnum in America in 1850. The American public lionized her and the orchestras. Dodworth was one of the most prominent band leaders at this time. His band played at Presidential inaugurations. Moreover, Dodworth led his group at Zachary Taylor's inauguration on March 5, 1849, a program managed by Ball Coordinator, Abraham Lincoln. The music for the Jenny Lind Polka was originally composed by Anton Wallerstein (1813-92), who was famous both in Germany and America for his polkas. Hinge separated. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

7930
Preston, Howard W.- Washington's Visits to Providence. In Rhode Island Historical Society Collections. Vol. XIX, No. 4, pp. 97–116,October, 1926. Providence. The Rhode Island Historical Society. 1926. Illustrated. First Edition 21 pp. 8vo. Printed Paper Covers, as Issued. Library Bound in Hardboard Covers. A variant of this article was subsequently published separately by the the Rhode island State Bureau of Information in 1932 as Historical Publication Number Five (See ID # 7909). Very Good.
Price: $35.00

8274
Smith, Robert. (Report from The Committee on Roads and Canals).- US Govt. Documents: Ho. of Reps., 29th Congress, 1st Session. Rep. No.676. Improvement of the Mississippi River [To Accompany Bill H.R. No. 67]. May 4, 1846. Washington, DC U. S. Government. 1846. First Edition. 10 pp. 8vo. Removed. The Committee on Roads and Canals had been referred a bill regarding the Des Moines and Rock River Rapids. In this report the Committee disposes of the constitutional argument whereby the Federal government has the right to make improvements on the Mississippi River. The retail cost of the vast quantities of lead mined in the State of Illinois and the Territories of Iowa and Wisconsin are augmented 25% by the need to pass these rapids at low water level. Also lost is the excessive cost and wastage of wheat and other produce due to seasonal need to pass the rapids. The value of local Federal and other lands is hence substantially reduced by the impact of the rapids. Tolls and local initiative are inadequate to the task. The committee recommends appropriation for the work in clearing the rapids and dredging by the Federal government. Appended is the engineering study supporting the feasibility of the project. Included tables document the required excavation. Minor spotting and offsetting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $45.00

8277
Galbraith, Mr.- US Govt. Documents: Ho. of Reps., 24th Congress, 2nd Session. Rep. No.272. Notes of the Bank of the United States [To Accompany Bill H.R. No. 956]. February 22, 1837. Washington, DC. U. S. Government. 1837. First Edition. 10 pp. 8vo. Removed. The Select Committee had been referred memorials regarding an amendment to the U. S. Constitution in relation to banking corporations in the states and reissuance of notes of the late Bank of the United States. This is part of the continuing saga of the Bank of the United States, originally chartered by Congress but discharged by Andrew Jackson. Continuing under charter of Pennsylvania, the Bank was reissuing notes for obligations to the United States. Congress was displeased and in this report enjoins the Bank from carrying on with this practice. Minor soiling and offsetting. Else, Very Good. 75.00 8277
Price: $75.00

10807
Gallaudet, Thomas H.- A Sermon Delivered at the Opening of the Connecticut Asylum for the Education and Instruction of Deaf and Dumb Persons, at the Request of the Directors, on Sunday Evening, April 20th, 1817, in the Brick Church in Hartford. Hartford, CT. Printed for the benefit of the Asylum, Hudson and Co., Printers. 1817. First Edition. 15 pp. Small 8vo. Two signatures, stab sewn. Self wrap. American Imprints 40885. Sabin 26408 A sermon at the opening of the first institution in America for the education of the deaf and dumb (Mark & Schwab, The Faith of Our Fathers, pp. 176–7). Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (1787–1851), who was the first to advocate the education of the deaf, was the first principal of the Asylum. Gallaudet University in Washington, specializing in the advanced education of the Deaf was named after his son, Edward Miner Gallaudet. The text of the sermon is derived from the prophet Isaiah, as are the three hymns which follow the text, composed for the occasion. A seminal document in the history of the education of the deaf. Minor chip at front corner ends. Small faint stain on lower edge of front cover. Else, very clean and Very Good +.
Price: $350.00

10841
[Broadside, Dorr War].- List of Committees, Appointed at a meeting of the friends of the present State Administration, held at the Court House, in this City, on Thursday Evening, April 10, 1834. N.P. [Providence, RI]. N.Pub. [? Committee of Certificate Voters]. 1834. Decorated. First Edition. 1 p. 6” W x 14 3/4” H Loose sheet. Elaborate printer’s devices form border surrounding entire text. Mowry. pp. 25–44. Gettleman, pp. 3–29 Signed in ink on reverse:”Walter R. Danorth Esq.”. After the American Revolution, Rhode Island continued to be governed by the Colonial Charter, given to Roger Williams by King Charles II in 1663. Suffrage limited to property holders, a weak Governor and judicial system and power strongly centered in the Legislature were its chief features. While the other colonies developed balanced constitutional systems with separation of powers, Rhode Island remained static, despite being the first locus of the Industrial Revolution in America. There was a progressive disappearance of agrarian landholders among the class of Freemen along with the increase in immigration, both in the northern cities, especially Providence. Voter eligibility declined to barely 3500 active voters in the state (Mowry, p.33). The early decades of the 19th century saw unrest among the disenfranchised citizens and agitation for extension of the suffrage and pursuit of greater democracy through replacement of the charter with a new constitution (Gettleman). In February–March, 1834 this agitation began to come to a head, leading to systematic action in the form of establishing a committee to consider the best approaches to a new constitution and extended suffrage. An “Address to the People” was prepared “masterfully” (Mowy, p. 38) written by Thomas Wilson Dorr, an activist lawyer, declaring suffrage to be a “natural right”. The Charter was severely criticized and a constitutional convention recommended as well as changes to the judiciary. In June, 1834 the legislature recommended a convention but chose the delegates from among the voting freemen and the issue gradually died. It was resurrected in 1842 with more agitation by Dorr and his associates, ultimately leading to the armed rebellion known as the Dorr War. This broadside appeared between Dorr’s “Address to the People” and the Legislative session and appears to be the formation of Committees by friends of the existing government to counter the suffrage movement. Among them, however, were some voters later in favor of the “Peoples Movement”, among them Barrington Anthony whose house became the headquarters of the armed rebellion, and Thoma F. Carpenter, a lawyer active in the “Committee of Nine Lawyers” who argued n 1842 for the legitimacy of a “People’s Convention” and constitutional reform. (Gettleman, pp. 64–9). An interesting broadside relating to the the early movements toward the Door Rebellion in Rhode Island (yet unrecorded in DeSimone & Schofield) listing the composition of various committees (including Vigilance Committees) in each ward of Providence) loyal to the Charter Government in 1834. Mild brownng Few small stains or ink marks in margins. Else, Very Good.
Price: $2,200.00

10855
Anonymous [Broadside]. The Doony Song. Air, When Johnny Comes Marching Home. As Sung by Matt Kelly. San Francisco, CA. T. C. Boyd. N.D. [1867] Printed vignette image of boxer and border composed of printer’s devices. First Edition 1 p. 4 9/16” W x 8” H. Loose sheet. A boxing broadside with San Francisco imprint, likely from 1867, celebrating the victory of the American middleweight, Tom Chandler, a Californian, over the favored English champion Dooney Harris. The celebrated victory was by knockout in the twenty-third round of the bareknuckle fight on April 13, 1867. The middleweight class first developed in the 1840’s and this was likely the first middleweight class American championship fight. Chandler became known as the American Middleweight Champion. Boxing gloves were not used till 1884. Dooney Harris was shot by “Billy” Clough, who was arrested for the attack by the New York City police on April 9, 1874, at a saloon in Greenwich Village, while playing cards with his cronies. He claimed he had shot Dooney in self-defense (New York Times, April 9, 1874). Dooney Harris survived to fight again and is recorded to have fought “Denver” Ed Smith ( née Edward Cororan) in 1884–5 in New York, as did Tommy Chandler. The tune of “The Doony Song” was “When Johnny Comes Marching Home”, whose music and lyrics were written by Patrick Sarsfield Gilmore (under the pseudonym Louis Lambert), a great Irish-born American bandmaster and composer. It was based on a traditional Irish air, “Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye”, not on a Negro Spiritual as claimed by some. Soiled. Tidal mark at lower corner. Chips from 3 margins, not encroaching on printed border. Small chip from body with small loss from left border, up to, but not involving text. Else, Good.
Price: $250.00

10856
[Peabody, Ephraim].- [Pamphlet]. Slavery in the United States: Its Evils, Alleviations, and Remedies. Reprinted from the North American Review, Oct., 1851. Boston. Charles C. Little and James Brown. 1851. First Edition. 36 pp. Large 12mo. Tan Printed paper wraps. Appl. Cycl. Am. Biog., Dumond, p. 90. Ephraim Peabody (1807–56), the author of this pamphlet was the son of a New Hampshire blacksmith. He became a prominent New England Unitarian minister, later the beloved minister of King’ Chapel in Boston. A graduate of Phillips Academy at Exeter, Bowdoin and Harvard Divinity School he was a strong supporter of rational Christianity, the liberal Unitarian position. He served in Pennsylvania, the West (Cincinnati) and married the granddaughter of Elias Haskett Derby, the first American millionaire. His daughter married Charles Eliot, later the President of Harvard. He suffered from tuberculosis and moved about to essay a cure, but failed. He died young of the disease. Peabody had helped plan the Boston public school system. He had a wide group of friends including Frderick T. Gray and the circle about William Ellery Channing. His sensitivity to the poor and deprived in society was heightened by this exposure and he founded the Boston Provident Society, to succor the poor. In 1849 he wrote an essay in strong support of Frederick Douglass and, here in 1851, an attack on slavery. He saw slavery as woven deeply into the fabric and institutions of our society. It had, accordingly a disastrous influence on our people, both Black and White. He showed his Enlightenment base in dealing with the issues on the basis of rights and duties. Peabody acknowledged that States Rights was the operant principle, but it would be too long to await the growth of an emancipation party in the South. The Border states showed increasingly a decline in slavery, but with economic concerns paramount and cotton being “king”, the growth of other industries should lessen the institution of slavery. Colonization in Africa, financed by the government, might help Emancipation, but it might remove those free Black leaders who might be helpful to lead the Black community out of slavery. Colonization n Jamaica might be more readily successful. However the preservation of the Union is critical to the welfare of both Blacks and Whites. The then current strife has heightened the sensitivity of all to notions of justice, personal rights and constitutional law. The author’s hope is that such attention, in a united nation will lead to the growth of notions of justice and of freedom for all. Loss of 1 1/2” from top of front cover without loss of text. Soiling of covers. Wear at lower end of spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $245.00

10864
Harrison, William Henry.- Gen. Harrison’s Speech at the Dayton Convention, September 10, 1840 [Boston, MA} The Whig Republican Association of Boston. [Gould, Kendell & Lincoln]. [1840]. First Edition. 8 pp. 8vo. Self-wraps with title above text. Sabin 30573n, Am Imp 40-2970. An uncommon title, One of only the few of Harrison’s campaign speeches to be published. Annotated in textual parentheses with commentary on the immense or tremendous cheering, the great and lasting sensation, lending a charming verisimilitude. Harrison claims his past experiences stand in place of promises. He does promise to lessen the power of the Chief Executive, a power that then bordered on despotism. He favored paper money, but also a vigorous banking system. He supports strong States Rights. To strengthen the democratic spirit, Harrison calls for lesser power to and fewer demands from political parties. Paper toned and dusty. Held together by 2 later stitches. Tidal mark. Horizontal fold. Edges show a few short closed tears and tiny chips. Else, Good +.
Price: $80.00

10865
Thome, Ja[me]s A[rmstrong] and J[oseph] Horace Kimball.- The Anti–Slavery Examiner, No. 7. Emancipation in the West Indies. A Six Months’ Tour in Antigua, Barbadoes, and Jamaica, in the Year 1837. New York. The American Ant-Slavery Society. 1838. First Edition. 128 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Double column format. Self wraps. Dumond, pp . 9–10. LCP/HSP AfroAmercana 10208. Sabin 95460. AmImp 53294. Cundall, Bib. West Indies, #2236. http://www.civilwar.si.edu/slavery_thome.html (for Thome). Appl. Cyclo. Am. Biog. (for Kimball). A later edition contains a 32 page “Extra”. A deluxe edition was published in boards and the contents in 489 pp. A critical review of the effects and problems encountered in the lead-up to and the processes of emancipation in the West Indies. The information was gathered in a 6 month tour of the islands of Antigua, Barbadoes and Jamaica. James A, Thome (1813–73) the son of a Kentucky slaveholder, was initially uneasy about slavery, but grew appalled in 1834 as a student of theology, after attending a debate on the moral aspects of slavery. As a traveling agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1837, he and Joseph Horace Kimball conducted this study of the emancipation of the slaves in the British West Indies. Kimball (1813–38), a friend of Thome, resided in New Hampshire, where he edited “The Herald of Freedom”, an anti-slavery journal. They refuted the prevalent notion that slavery could be abolished only gradually so as to prepare the slaves for a new life of freedom. Consequently, the Society changed its platform to a demand for “unconditional freedom without delay”. In 1839 Thome escaped from Ohio to Connecticut to avoid arrest for helping a runaway slave to freedom. Lacks folding map frontispiece. Mild foxing of covers. Else. Very Good.
Price: $155.00

6262
Anonymous (Editor), The American Minstrel [: Being a Choice Collection of the Most Popular Songs, Glees, Duetts, Choruses, &c., Many of Which Are Original; with Select Music]. Cincinnati, OH. [J. A. James and Co.] N.D. [ca. 1836] Engraved frontispiece of the Muse Cecelia, by W. Woodruff of Cincinnati. First Edition 318 pp. 24mo. Green publisher’s cloth, embossed in the blind. Gilt title and decoration on spine. Hay-Harris Collection at Brown, Songster Coll. AM5615. Complete with Index. A collection of popular songs, some with music. Includes some musical notation in shape notes. Quite scarce. Lacks title page.Mild soiling, foxing and tidal marking. Mild wear at ends of spine and edges and corners of covers. One signature shaken. Else, Very Good.
Price: $375.00

6841
Keynes, John Maynard.- The Economic Consequences of the Peace. New York. Harcourt, Brace and Howe. 1920. First American Edition 298 pp. 8vo. Blue publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine. Publisher’s logo embossed in the blind on front cover. T.e.g. Printing and the Mind of Man, p. 423 J. M. Keynes (1883–1946) was one of the most prominent economists of the 20th century. Present to represent the British Treasury at the Paris peace conference at the end of World War I, he decried the reparations demanded of Germany. Largely on his complaints, the US rejected the final Treaty of Versailles. The book, thus, had a profound influence on post-World-War I reconstruction and established Keynes’s public reputation and credibility with governments. Front hinge starting internally. Mild wear at ends of spine and corners. Owner’s signature and date on front free endpaper. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

7282
Tourgée, Albion Winegar (pseudonym: “One of The Fools”),- A Fool’s Errand. New York. Fords, Howard, & Hulbert. 1880. First Edition. 361 pp. + 4pp. publisher’s ads at front and 4 pp at rear Brown publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine. Black titling and decorations on front cover; titling in the blind on rear cover. T.e.g. Coated end papers. Wright III, 5520. BAL 20346. A novel of The South under Reconstruction. published anonymously. Tourgée (1838–1905) wrote several pseudonymous novels about the South before and after the Civil War (see Wright II, 2523, e.g.) The last short chapter of this book is quite prophetic. Tourgée, an attorney, after the Civil War moved to North Carolina, where he met hostility and prejudice. He moved about thereafter. His books were known to Presidents Garfield and Harrison. Laid down on front pastedown is a newspaper clipping with a review of the novel and comments on Tourgée. His pseudonyms include Henry Churton, Edgar Henry and Siva. This issue is possibly the earliest reprint from the corrected plates. Front hinges cracked internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

7778
Root, George F.- The Young Men's Singing Book; a Collection of Music for Male Voices. Intended for Use in Colleges, Theological Seminariess, and the Social Circle> Consisting of Parts I- V. Boston. Oliver Ditson & Company. 1855. First Edition. 256 pp. Oblong. Blue printed paper covered boards with calf spine. Bound on tapes. By 1855 "The Star Spangled Banner," "Hail, Columbia'" "America" and other patriotic songs had crept into everyday collections like this one by a popular Boston music publisher. Root later moved to Chicago to work for his brother’s firm, Root & Cady, and to write much music, especially inspirational songs centering on the Civil War. Spine deteriorated. Hinges cracked. Text very good.
Price: $150.00

7782
Saunders, J. H.- The Shakespearian Advertiser. Providence, RI H. P. Boyce. 1871. Copiously Illustrated. First Edition. Unnumbered pages. 4 3/4” (W) x 5 3/4” (H). Illustrated orange stiff printed paper wraps, as Issued. RI Historical Society, Manuscript Division: Records of the Ann Eliza Club. Numerous comic illustrations of quotations from Shakespeare's plays interleaved with full-page advertisements for various firms and industries, mostly in Providence, RI. A window into commercial Rhode Island at the three quarters point of the nineteenth century. A humorous view of a literate society. Edward S. Jones (1846–1909) was a prominent artist in Providence, a member (#34) of the Ann Eliza Club, a noted local group of artists and collectors founded in 1885. Members were required to present papers to one another and humor was a by-word of the organization. Small tear to lower margin of rear cover extending into last page. Cover lightly soiled. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

9360
[Sheet Music]. Root, George F.- Just after the Battle. Song and Chorus by Geo. F. Root. Chicago. Root & Cady. 1863. Cover engraving by Copcutt-Williams. Illustrations of Civil War scenes and popular song titles by George F. Root. First Edition. 5 pp. = publisher's ads on verso of both covers. Fo. Illustrated, heavily engraved front cover. Disbound and stab-sewn. Fisher, 150 Yrs. Music Publ. US, pp. 59, 60, 129, 132. Pre-fire Chicago imprint of Civil War music. A wounded soldier lies in pain thinking of his mother, but optimistic of his survival. Root & Cady, the pioneer music publisher of Chicago, was founded in 1858, became Geo. F. Root & Sons after the fire in 1871 and the catalogue then sold to John Church in 1873. George Root, originally from Boston where he was an active composer of anthems, choruses and sacred music, had joined Root & & Cady in 1859. Wear at edges. Foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

10728
Holcombe, W[illia]m H[enry].- Suggestions as to the Spiritual Philosophy of African Slavery, Addressed to the Members and Friends of the Church of the New Jerusalem. New York. Mason Brothers. 1861. First Edition. 24 pp. Catalogue of Swedenborgian oamphlets on rear cover. 8vo. Blue printed paper wrappers. DAB. A justification of slavery by Dr. William H. Holcombe, a noted homeopathic physician practicing in Mississippi and New Orleans. A Swedenborgian, Holcombe, who had been trained in allopathic medicine, adopted homeopathy when that discipline seemed more effective in the treatment of yellow fever and cholera, after he had moved South. He felt that the different races had differing spiritual lives and that Blacks had a more primitive interior life as they ascended to an agricultural society from the stage of hunter-gatherers. He finds in the fact of enslavement of Blacks a self-justification of the institution of slavery and the inference of a more primitive state of Black spiritual life. He argues, further, that American slavery has enabled the highest moral and spiritual development of Blacks ever achieved. Holcombe, born in Virginia, was very well educated and encouraged by his parents, who were supporters of the emancipation of slaves and, in fact, liberated their slaves. Holcombe, who was a nationally renowned homeopathist, and his brother, James Philemon Holcombe, in contrast, became ardent supporters of slavery. Mild soiling o covers. Vertical soft creasing. Owner’s names on front cover: Daniel L. Webster (in ink) and R. Hancock (?) in pencil. Else, Very Good.
Price: $200.00

10735
[Sheet Music]. Root, Geo[rge] F. (Words and Music).- On, On, On, the Boys Are Marching! Or the Prisoner Free. Song & Chorus. Sequel to “Tramp, Tramp, Tramp.” Chicago, IL. Root & Cady. 1865. Cover illustration engraved by Copcott- Williams First Edition. 5 pp. Fo. Elaborately illustrated and decorated paper wraps. Fisher, 150 Yrs. Music Publ. US, pp. 59, 60, 129, 132. An ante-fire musical issue by Root & Cady. Not in American Imprints Inventory, No. 4, Check List of Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints, 1851–1871. One of George Root’s famous Civil War songs in its first edition. Piano ads inside front cover. Ad for George Root’s music instruction manual on rear cover. Root & Cady, the pioneer music publisher of Chicago, was founded in 1858, became Geo. F. Root & Sons after the fire in 1871 and the catalogue then sold to John Church in 1873. George Root, originally from Boston where he was an active composer of anthems, choruses and sacred music, had joined Root & Cady in 1859. Foxing, principally near edges. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10742
[Dwight, Rev. E[dwin] W[elles].- Memoirs of Henry Obookiah, a Native of the Sandwich Islands, Who Died at Cornwall, Conn. Feb. 17, 1818, Aged 26 Years. New York. The American Tract Society. D. Fanshaw, Printer. N.D. [? 1832] Frontispiece portrait of Obookiah, engraved by Daggett, Hinman & Co., with tissue guard. Revised Edition. 124 pp. 16mo. Original brown calf spine with gilt titling andf gilt rules. Original marbled paper covered boards. Hill, pp. 91-2. Sabin,56429 (for first edition) Not in Howes. Am Imp 12243 (for this 1832 edition) Obookiah was born in Hawaii and came to the U.S. in 1809. "After witnessing the massacre of his family, Obookiah.decided to leave Hawaii. . . An American ship [the Triumph under Captain Brintnall ] touched at the islands, and Obookiah sailed by way of China to New York. Through Obookiah, interest was awakened in the Hawaiians, which led to the American mission in Hawaii in 1820." — Hill p. 91-92. (Quoted by Ten Pound Island) . In the US, he attended the Foreigh Mission School. He had translated the Book of Genesis into Hawaiian, but he died of typhoid fever before he could go back to Hawaii as a missionary.. "This book did more than any other work to interest the general public of New England in supporting a mission to the Hawaiian Islands proposed by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. It narrates the life of Henry Obookiah (or Opukakaia), born in Hawwaii about the year 1792. As a youth he sailed to America, arriving there in 1809, and for a period made his home with Captain Brintnall in New Haven, Connecticut. At Yale College, his desire for knowledge was recognized, and he began instruction by private tutors, earning his support as a farm hand. -- Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography, 478. In the first edition, there are .... additional titles bound with the main text, which… are an integral part of the work. Forbes, Treasures, 58. First Edition." (Quoted by Lefkowicz). Originally published in 1819. Slight wear at ends of spine. Corners bumped. Mild foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $165.00

10749
Elder, William.- Biography of Elisha Kent Kane. Philadelphia; Boston. Childs & Peterson; Phillips Sampson & Co. 1858. Frontispiece portrait of Dr. Kane, engraved from a Brady Daguerreotype by T. Phillibrown, Sr. Engraved title page and vignette by J.Warr and 4 tissue-guarded plates, wood engravings (one signed as drawn by E. Moran, engraved by Van Ingen-Snyder) First Edition. 416 pp. + 2 pp. publsher’s ads @ front and 2 pp. ads @ rear Brown embossed publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine. Chocolate coated end papers. DAB. Sabin 22094. Elisha Kent Kane (1820–57) was a physician and American Naval Officer. After beginning his career as a physician in 1842, he enlisted as a Naval Surgeon and served in India, China, Africa, Europe, Mexico and elsewhere. He later explored the routes to the Northwest Passage. Having served as a physician on the First Grinnell Expedition (1850) to the North Pole in search of Sir John Franklin, he was in command of the Second Expedition to the Pole (1853–55), making significant observations on the nature of ice and glaciers and the magnetic pole, charting new areas, and showing extraordinary leadership qualities. After his ship had been trapped in ice for over a year, He brought his men “overland” 1300 miles to Greenland in 10 weeks, losing only one man. Wear at ends of spine, edges and corners of boards. Owner’s signature in pencil on front free endpaper. Minimal foxing of preliminaries. Else, Very Good.
Price: $110.00

10752
[Anonymous].- Insurrection of the Blacks. In Niles' Weekly Register. Fourth Series. Nos. 1– 4 – Vol. V. Sept 3, 10, 17, 24, 1831. [Vol.XLI, Whole No. 1,041–4], pp. 4–5, 35, 66–7 Baltimore, MD. H. Niles. 1831. First Edition. 72 pp. 8vo. Self wraps. Disbound. Four complete issues of Niles’ Weekly Register, comprising the issues of September, 1831. Niles continues to report in three of these issues on the major insurrection by Black slaves under the leadership of Nat [Turner] in Southampton County, Virginia on or about August 21-23, 1831. The slaves, apparently hiding in the nearby swamps and numbering by various estimates from one to several hundred, possibly under white leadership, rose as an insurgency and attacked a number of white families, killing up to 70 persons. A militia of 300 persons was retreating. The author believes plunder to have been the motive, since "there is little disaffection in the slaves generally." He reports that all the rebels had been captured by the militias, the Army and the Navy. Details of the insurrection and murders are provided. Nat’s capture and return to Virginia are falsely reported and Dismal Swamp was scoured for participants in the insurrection. Most of the participants had been executed. Garrison and his paper, The Liberator, are criticized for promoting insurrection and massacre. Agitation in North Carolina consequent to the Virginia insurrection is discussed. All free Blacks in Raleigh had been arrested and examined. Many were evicted from the city and some executed. Also noted in this issue are: much political activity and elections, activities of legislatures, concerns over the Bank, etc. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10755
[Anonymous].- The American Songster; Being a Collection of the Most Popular, Patriotic, Naval, Military, and Sentimental American Songs. New York. Philip J. Cozans, Publisher. N.D. [ca. 1855] Numerous small wood engavings as head and tail pieces. Three full-page wood engravings depicting the Battle of Bunker Hill (frontispiece), Napoleon, Robin Hood and His Bride. First Edition. 242 pp. + 10 pp. Index. 32 mo. Blue publisher’s cloth, embossed in the blind. Gilt titling and decoration on spine. T.e.g Hay-Harris Coll. (Brown) A51271, 1858? A compendium of 18th and 19th century popular songs, divided into 5 sections, each with its own Index: Songs of the Ocean; Deck and Port Songs; American Songs; Uncle Sam’s Songs; and Pirate and Robin Hood Songs. It includes “The Star Spangled Banner”. Only a few songs are labeled with composer or singer, e.g., [Henry] Russell, Dickinson and Chapman, Henry Phillips, John Roddy Cunningham, et al. Cozans was a publisher of books and chapbooks, many with patriotic or abolitionist themes, active in New York ca. 1847–55 Owner’s signature at front: “Miss Mary Delaney, Age 50 in March the 21 Day”. Very uncommon; found only in Hay-Harris Collection (dated ?1858] among major libraries. Hinges cracked internally. Covers much abraded (but intact) and worn at corners and edges. Gilt worn. Foxing. Lacks rear end paper. Overall Fair.
Price: $360.00

10760
Anonymous.- Revival Melodies, or, Songs of Zion, Dedicated to Elder Jacob Knapp. Twentieth Edition. Boston. John Putnam. 1842. Twentieth Edition. 64 pp. + 2 pp. Gilbert piano-forte ads. 16mo. Blue printed paper wraps. Tan cloth spine. Obituary of Knapp in NY Times, 3/5/1874. Hay-Harris (hMusic R4545s) at Brown. A collection of hymns gathered in the Revivalist spirit. Derived from the favorites of and dedicated to Elder Jacob Knapp (1799–1874), a mobile, much celebrated Baptist evangelist of the early and mid nineteenth century. Knapp was active in the temperance and abolitionist movements and favored his itinerant pulpit, stretching from New England to California, over an assigned parish. Born into the Episcopal Church, he converted at age 20. His early revivalist experience was in Watertown, NY, although he had earlier been recognized for his skill at conversions. In his career, he was sad to have converted 100.000 souls The rear cover boasts of 34,000 copies issued in 9 months. Dated 1842 on title page, 1843 on cover. In Hay-Harris Collection at Brown; also at Harvard, Chicago and several theological libraries. Uncommon. Mild soiling and wrinkling of covers. Mild wear at ends of spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

10767
Tourgée, Albion W[inegar],- Bricks without Straw. A Novel. New York. Fords, Howard, & Hulbert. 1880. Frontispiec engraved on wood (with tissue guard). First Edition, Second Issue 521 pp. + 4pp. publisher’s ads at rear. 12mo. Brown publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine. Black titling and decorations on front cover; titling and decorations in the blind on rear cover. T.e.g. Wright III, 5516. BAL 20349. A novel of The South under Reconstruction. Tourgée (1838–1905) wrote several pseudonymous novels about the South before and after the Civil War (see Wright II, 2523, e.g.). Tourgée, an attorney, after the Civil War moved to North Carolina, where he met hostility and prejudice. He moved about thereafter. His books were known to Presidents Garfield and Harrison. His pseudonyms include Henry Churton, Edgar Henry, “One of the Fools” and Siva. This issue is the earliest from the corrected plates (on p. 343, l. 17. See Wright III, 5516). Mild wear at end of spine and corners. Owner’s signature on front free end paper. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10773
Phillips, Wendell.- [Pamphlet]. Review of Lysander Spooner's Essay on the Unconstitutionality of Slavery. Reprinted from the "Anti-Slavery Standard," with Additions. Boston. Andrews and Prentiss. 1847. First Edition. 95 pp. 12mo in 6’s. Tan printed paper wraps. Stab Sewn. LCP 8173. Lysander Spooner (1808–1887) was a prominent lawyer of Boston interested in constitutional matters. He was an ardent abolitionist, who was convinced of the unconstitutionality of slavery. He hoped to abolish that institution by judicial action and published a tract on this matter. Wendell Phillips (1811–1884), an orator of Boston, also an abolitionist as well as champion of labor reform and women's suffrage, wanted slavery abolished by legislative action since he considered the constitution to support it. In this pamphlet Phillips reviews Spooner's document and details his disagreements with him. Spooner's works have been republished in the modern era by M & S Press and are still in print from the publisher. Of interest, Spooner published another document supporting the unconstitutionality of the guilty verdict of Professor John W. Webster for the celebrated murder of Dr. George Parkman in 1849 on the basis that the jury had not been drawn from Professor Webster's peers, since they all had favored the death penalty (dissenters from that position having been excused).. Small chip fromedge of cover (present). Else, Very Good.
Price: $280.00

10774
[Stereopticon Card] Curtis, Geo[rge] E. 233. American Falls from Canada. Niagara Falls, NY. Geo. E. Curtis, Photographer. N.D. [? 1874]. First Edition. 1 p. 2 7/8” x 6 15/16” Stereo photographs mounted on orange card with rounded corners and decoratve imprint. The mount is flat. Waldsmith, Stereo Views. Darrah, Stereo Views. On reverse, holographic signature: “C.J.P./ June 1874. Curtis was a Niagara Falls photographer, noted for his views of the Falls, various bridges across the Falls, etc. Actve 1868–78, he photographed Madame Spelterini on the high wire as she became the first woman to cross the Niagara Falls by wire in 1872. In the flowering of stereo views, when Curtis was active, Niagara Falls was one of the favorite subjects for stereo photographers, who photographed all aspects of the Falls in all seasons. Very good.
Price: $150.00

10792
Elliott, Maud Howe.- This Was My Newport. Cambridge, MA. The Mythology Company, a. Marshall Jones. 1945. Second Edition with First Edition Titie Page, dated 1944. 279 pp. 8vo Red publisher’s cloth with black titling on spne and front cover. A charming bit of the social history of fashionable Newport, RI, by the daughter of Samuel Gridley Howe and Julia Ward howe. Very Good +.
Price: $35.00

10796
Potter, Elisha R.- Considerations on the Questions of the Adoption of a Constitution, and Extension of Suffrage in Rhode Island. Boston. Thomas H. Webb & Co. 1842. First Edition. 64 pp. Green printed paper wraps William M. Wiecek, Am. J. Legal History, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Jul., 1978), pp. 237–53. Mowry, p.81. Elisha Reynolds Potter (1811–82) was a noted Rhode Island jurist and politician, serving on the Rhode Island Supreme Court and in the US Congress, where his father had served before him. He was a propertied citizen in the politically overweighted area south of Providence, and a member of the conservative establishment of Rhode Island. Potter was a defender of the Freeholder’s Convention, based on the King Charles Charter, which still held in Rhode Island, against the People’s Convention, based on extended suffrage and championed by Thomas Wilson Dorr. These Rhode Island conservatives did not share the republican conservatism of the Whigs in post-Jacksonian America, but indulged in a non-republican “Peculiar Conservatism” (Wiecek). The Conservatives were proud of their anachronistic charter government with its limited suffrage and lack of social unrest. This was to be disrupted by the Dorr Rebellion. In this pamphlet, Potter argues that the Charter has yielded the most democratic government in America with its freehold qualification for voting, and calls the suffragist movement an unjustified revolution. He opposes the concepts of “natural rights” and the utilitarian precept of “the greatest good for the greatest number” and discusses the tyranny of the majority and limited rights of women, yet he defends the Rhode Island government as being as republican as any other state, although RI was one of only two states with property qualifications for voting. This is the most intellectual and authoritative defense of the anti-Dorr position. Tiny chip at foot of spine. Else, Very Good +
Price: $325.00

10816
Webster, Daniel.- The Rhode island Question. Mr. Webster’s Argument in the Supreme Court of the United States, in the Case of Martin Luther vs. Luther M. Borden and Others, January 27th, 1848. Washington. J. and G. S. Gideon, Printers. 1848. First Edition. 20 pp. 8vo. Removed. Self wraps. Harvard Law Cat. II, 883. Bartlett, pp. 105, 270–1. Not in Sabin. The Dorr Rebellion in Rhode Island came after attempts, beginning in 1841, to extend suffrage to citizens without real property. An armed uprising occurred as the government legitimized under the state charter resisted voting extension. A new regime was voted in by the rebellious citizenry. Webster argued to the Supreme Court that any change in government from the old charter government would have to occur in conformity with the existing ratified constitution and not through measures voted without such conformity. Chief Justice Taney ruled that the US Supreme Court had no jurisdiction in what was a political argument, relevant only to Rhode Island, whose courts had rightfully made their decision. (For a detailed summary of the case, see Mowry,The Dorr War, pp. 231.-237 and Gettleman, The Dorr Rebellion, pp. 174–199 ). The People’s Government of Rhode Island, then, were without standing. A 26 page edition with same text also exists (no priority). Minor foxing of title page and page edges. Vertical fold. Else, Very Good.
Price: $160.00

10819
American Anti-Slavery Society.- Declaration of Sentiments of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Adopted at the Formation of Said Society, in Philadelphia, on the 4th Day of December, 1833. New York. American Anti_Slavery Society. N.D. [1844]. First Edition. 4 pp. 8vo. Self-wraps. Sabin 81825 A re-issue of the Declaration of Sentiments, which was originally published in 1835 with the Constitution of the Anti-Slavery Society, both from the 1833 organizational meeting (Sabin 81826, Am Imp 30019. LCP/HFC Afro-Americana, Hogg 3075). This pamphlet, with no date, but probably 1844 from internal evidence, conforms to Sabin 81825, and is labeled [Penny Tracts], [Number I] , the first in a series of important tracts issued by the American Anti-Slavery Society. It includes the Preamble to the Constitution and a short portion of The Address ( a manifesto) presented at the Tenth Anniversary of the Society in 1844. Very Good +.
Price: $195.00

10612
[Broadside].- DEBATE on Spiritualism! ?La Porte, ? IN. C. W. Cathcart and F. Church. N.D. [?ca. 1845) First Edition. 1 p. 11” W x 9 1/2” H. The broadside announces a debate on Spiritualism at Allen’s Hall La Porte on July 28, at 7:30 PM. The Question for the debate is, “Does the Bible warrant us in believing that the principal phenomena of modern spiritualism are produced through the agency of human spirits formerly embodied on this earth.” The name of the “affirmant” is excised neatly from the document. (Did he or she “chicken out”?). The “respondent” is named as Rev, [sic!] F. H. Berrick of Lowell, Massachusetts. Admission was 10 cts. The location is uncertain, but there is an Allen’s Hall in La Porte, Indiana allegedly named after Colonel John Allen, a Kentucky lawyer, who was killed in the Massacre of River Basin in 1813. The county is in northwestern Indiana. There is also a published speech by a C. W. Cathcart of Indiana, on Rivers and Harbors, delivered in 1847 and published then by Washington Blair & Rives (printers). Despite the uncertainty of date and location, this is a fascinating mid-19th C. document on Spiritualism. Edges chipped. Old central fold. Name excised (half of one line of text). Toning. Else, Very Good, with dramatic textual impact.
Price: $400.00

10642
[Stereoscopic View] Bierstadt, C[harles].- 150. Amer[ican] Falls from Below, Niagara, N.Y. Niagara Falls, NY. C. Bierstadt, Photographer. N.D. [ca. 1868-75] First Edition. 1 p. 3 3/8’ x 7” Images in black & white, mounted on orange card, with rounded corners and blank reverse Darrah, Stereo Views, 1864. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, 1991 A grand image of the American Falls in Niagara, NY by Charles Bierstadt, published by him in stereoscopic view. Bierstadt started out in New Bedford, MA, in partnership with his brother Edward, as photographers and publishers of stereoscopic views, from 1860 to 1866. Some of their earliest views were photographed by brother Albert Bierstadt, notably the Landers Expedition to the American West in 1859. They then separated, selling their negatives to S. F. Adams, Edward moving to New York City, while Charles and his sister Eliza moved to Niagara, NY and continued extensive stereoscopic publication. In the 1880’s, he sold his negatives to Underwood & Underwood, who continued to publish them into the 20th century. Charles Bierstadt’s views of Niagara Falls in all seasons are among the best published. Very Good.
Price: $140.00

10643
[Stereoscopic View] Bierstadt, C[harles].- 141. Crystal Ice. Luna Island Winter. Niagara, N.Y. Niagara Falls, NY. C. Bierstadt, Photographer. N.D. [ca. 1868-75] First Edition. 1 p. 3 3/8’ x 7” Images in black & white, mounted on orange card, with rounded corners and blank reverse Darrah, Stereo Views, 1864. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, 1991 A grand image of the American Falls in Niagara, NY by Charles Bierstadt, published by him in stereoscopic view. Bierstadt started out in New Bedford, MA, in partnership with his brother Edward, as photographers and publishers of stereoscopic views, from 1860 to 1866. Some of their earliest views were photographed by brother Albert Bierstadt, notably the Landers Expedition to the American West in 1859. They then separated, selling their negatives to S. F. Adams, Edward moving to New York City, while Charles and his sister Eliza moved to Niagara, NY and continued extensive stereoscopic publication. In the 1880’s, he sold his negatives to Underwood & Underwood, who continued to publish them into the 20th century. Charles Bierstadt’s views of Niagara Falls in all seasons are among the best published. Very Good.
Price: $110.00

10644
[Stereoscopic View] Bierstadt, C[harles].- 627. Ice Tree. Luna Island. Niagara, N.Y. Niagara Falls, NY. C. Bierstadt, Photographer. N.D. [ca. 1868-75] First Edition. 1 p. 3 3/8’ x 7” Images in black & white, mounted on orange card, with rounded corners and blank reverse Darrah, Stereo Views, 1864. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, 1991 A grand image of the American Falls in Niagara, NY by Charles Bierstadt, published by him in stereoscopic view. Bierstadt started out in New Bedford, MA, in partnership with his brother Edward, as photographers and publishers of stereoscopic views, from 1860 to 1866. Some of their earliest views were photographed by brother Albert Bierstadt, notably the Landers Expedition to the American West in 1859. They then separated, selling their negatives to S. F. Adams, Edward moving to New York City, while Charles and his sister Eliza moved to Niagara, NY and continued extensive stereoscopic publication. In the 1880’s, he sold his negatives to Underwood & Underwood, who continued to publish them into the 20th century. Charles Bierstadt’s views of Niagara Falls in all seasons are among the best published. Very Good.
Price: $110.00

10645
[Stereoscopic View] Bierstadt, C[harles].- 1067. Three Politicians. Niagara Falls, NY. C. Bierstadt, Photographer. N.D. [ca. 1868-75] First Edition. 1 p. 3 3/8’ x 7” Images in black & white, mounted on orange card, with rounded corners and blank reverse. Darrah, Stereo Views, 1864. Waldsmith, Stereo Views, 1991 An image of a sculpture of three comic figures by Charles Bierstadt, published by him in stereoscopic view. Probably one of the popular Rogers Group of plaster casts collected by John Rogers and photographed by Charles Bierstadt. Bierstadt started out in New Bedford, MA, in partnership with his brother Edward, as photographers and publishers of stereoscopic views, from 1860 to 1866. Some of their earliest views were photographed by brother Albert Bierstadt, notably the Landers Expedition to the American West in 1859. They then separated, selling their negatives to S. F. Adams, Edward moving to New York City, while Charles and his sister Eliza moved to Niagara, NY and continued extensive stereoscopic publication. In the 1880’s, he sold his negatives to Underwood & Underwood, who continued to publish them into the 20th century. Charles Bierstadt’s views of Niagara Falls in all seasons are among the best published. Very Good.
Price: $100.00

10647
Roelker, William Greene and Clarkson A. Collins, III.- One Hundred Fifty Years of Providence Washington Insurance Company. 1799–1949. Providence, RI. Providence Washington Insurance Company 1949. Illustrated. First Edition. 153 pp. 8vo. Red publisher’s cloth with gilt titling on front cover and spine. Glassine D.J. In red cardboard box (with brass cllps), as issued. The third oldest insurance company in America celebrates 150 years with the publlcation of this history of the company. Box lacks tongue of one of brass clips. Else, Very Good +.
Price: $45.00

10651
Wayland, Francis.- [Pamphlet]. The Affairs of Rhode-Island, a Discourse Delivered at the Meeting-House of the First Baptist Church, Providence, May 22, 1842. Providence, RI. R. Cranston & Co. and H. H.Brown. 1842. Third Edition. 32 pp. 8vo. Light brown printed paper wraps. J. R. Bartlett, p.269. Gettleman, pp. 117n, 147n, 246. A speech in opposition to the principles of Thomas Dorr and his party by the noted Baptist minister, social philosopher and president of Brown University, Francis Wayland. It was delivered as the most violent period of the Dorr War was evolving in 1842. The conservative Dr. Wayland argues against the threat of "anarchy," "lawless soldiery" and acts which "question the very existence of society." He argues against the adoption of a new constitution by declaring the existing one void. Rather he proposes the working of a new constitution through using the laws of the existing one. Wayland misses the fallacy of the then existing constitution of Rhode Island, a document descended from the early 17th century Carolingian charter of the colony, which restricted voting rights to the landed classes in a new industrial society where the holding of property was no longer the mark of investment in the social order. It took about 50 more years for the constitution of Rhode Island to begin to enlarge the franchise and, because of the unbalanced power of the legislature, the government of Rhode Island remains today a parliamentary system and some of the evils that Dorr contested persist today.Some of the violent anti-Dorr opinion by Wayland had a nativist basis. A letter from John Pitman, Judge of the US District Court, responding to the first issue of this address, is printed in this issue with a correction to Wayland’s argument that the authority for property ownership as a determinant of voting rights came, not from the King Charles Charter, but from an act passed by the General Assembly in 1724 and reaffirmed in 1798 and again in 1822. Ex libris with library stamps on recto of front cover and on title page. Later cloth spine applied. Else, Very Good.
Price: $165.00

10652
Eaton, Amasa M.- Constitution-Making in Rhode Island. Providence, RI. Rhode Island Constitutional League. 1899. First Edition. 128 pp. 8vo. Grey printed paper wraps. The title page quotes Washington that “The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and alter their constitutions of government”. this article explores the legal and historical precedents for the right of the people to change their constitution. It has cogent commentary on the Dorr rebellion and relevant citations and comments on the authority of constitutions and civll government in a democracy. Inscribed by Eaton to Henry S. Burrage in 1902. Burrage, a Brown University graduate and Baptist minister (D.D..) in Maine, wrote a history of Brown University in the Civil War, based upon his diary. He was also author of articles on Protestantism and its history, history of Maine, Roger Williams and Rhode Island history, etc. Eaton, a lawyer descended from John Brown, slave trader and early benefactor of Brown University, wrote for the Harvard and Yale Law Reviews and other publications on torts, Rhode Island history and vexing issues of the rights of states vs. cities and towns, on the need for uniform State constitutions, the rights of corporations (Dartmouth College) against the State’s assumption of property, etc. He declared bankruptcy at one point. This article is referred to in Patrick T. Conley’s “Democracy in Decline. Rhode Island Constitutional Development, 1776–1841”. Ex libris, with only modest markings. Later blue-grey cloth spine applied and sewn. Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

10663
[? Pollock, Charles and/or Charles Seaver].].- [Stereoscopic View] Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall. Boston. Boston. Possibly Charles Seaver &/or Charles Pollock. N.D. [1872–76] First Edition. 1 p. Waldsmith, 50, 52. Darrah, Stereo Views. Albumen print. A stereoscopic view of Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall in Boston from the late 19th century. Yellow-faced card mounting. Part of the American Scenery series, published at 182 Washington St., Boston. Publisher not indicated, but style, subject and period suggest either Pollock or Seaver. Slight fading, but overall, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10670
Parsons, C[harles] W[illiam], M.D.- [Pamphlet]. Notice of the History of Population in the State of Rhode Island. N.P. [Providence, RI]. N.Pu. [State of RI. N.D. [1859] First Edition. 8 pp. 8vo. Tan paper covers with added blue-green linen spine ApplCycAmBiog. (for Parsons). A history and analysis of the population of Rhode Island, from mid-17th century, just after its founding by Roger Williams (1636) to the time of this publication (1858–9), using tax levies, the periodic census, starting in 1708 up to that of 1850. The analysis examines the effects of immigration, the effects of war, urbanization, and changes in the racial composition including the shrinkage of the black population and the disappearance by 1858 of pure-blood Native Americans. the data provided are extremely interesting and useful demographics. This report is part of the Sixth Registration Report of RI. C. W. Parsons, M.D.(1823–after 1882), was the son of Usher Parsons, the illustrious naval physician and historian of the Battle of Lake Erie in the War of 1812, a memoir of whom was published by his son, a professor at Brown and an active member of the Rhode Island Historical Society. Ex libris with stamped marking on cover and title page. Old vertical fold. Ink labels on front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $145.00

10679
Davis, Jefferson.- Speech of Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, On the Exercise of Civil Power and Authority by Military Officers; Delivered in the U. S. Senate, on Monday, August 5, 1850. [Washington, DC]. [1850] N.P. (? Govt. Doc.). First Edition. 16 pp. 8vo. Disbound... Brown, Hay Metcalf. LCCN 10025134. A defense of Zachary Taylor’s career in the Mexican War. Jefferson Davis (1808–89), Senator from Mississippi, considers it unjust for his colleagues in the Senate, notably the Senator from Texas, to criticize General Taylor for allegedly exceeding his authority in exercising Civil Power over a region of Mexico in dispute over the boundary of Texas and New Mexico in the uncertain time at the end of the Mexican War. Davis justifies the Battle of Monterey on the basis of an ineffectual Texas militia and a vacuum of authority. Damp stain at lower corner. ?Trimmed. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10681
Garrison, William Lloyd.- A Brief Sketch of the Trial of William Lloyd Garrison, for an Alleged Libel on Francis Todd, of Massachusetts. Baltimore, MD. William Lloyd Garrison. 1830. First Edition. 6 pp. 8vo. No covers. Titled on first page in 6 fonts of type. AmImp 1553 (1830); see also AmImp 24574 (1834). A. H. Grimké, W. L. Garrison (1891), Chapter III. Garrison, Liberator, Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1, 1831) (for second trial). Abandoning gradualism, Garrison had published broadsides against slavery in the “Genius of Universal Emancipation”, a Baltimore journal which he co-edited with Benjamin Lundy. Baltimore was then a “slave emporium” (Grimké). One broadside was an attack on Francis Todd (and Nicholas Brown), a business man from Newburyport, Massachusetts for transporting slaves to be sold in the northern ship “Francis” from Baltimore to New Orleans. Todd sued Garrison for criminal libel and won in the kangaroo court of Baltimore and the abolitionist, unable to pay the $100 fine, was incarcerated. Garrison wrote this pamphlet in jail and it was circulated in 1830 (later published in 1834). The issue of slavery became enmeshed in th issue of freedom of the press. After 7 weeks of imprisonment, his fine was paid by Arthur Tappan, a generous New York businessman. Garrison returned to Boston and founded the abolitionist journal, the “Liberator”. In a second civil trial, Garrison was found guilty of libeling Todd and Brown and fined $1000, which was never paid. In 1831, the Georgia legislature called for his abduction and arrest, offering a $5000 reward, which was never claimed. Closely trimmed at lower margin with loss of last line of each page. Last leaf detached. Mildly foxed.Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

6530
De Tocqueville, Alexis.- Memoirs, Letters, and Remains of Alexis De Tocqueville, Author of Democracy in America. Translated from the French by the Translator of Napoleon’s Correspondence with King Joseph. With Large Additions. In Two Volumes. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1862. First American Edition 430, 442 pp. + 16 pp. publisher’s catalogue at end of Vol. I Small 8vo. Brown publisher’s cloth, embossed in the blind. Titled in gilt on spine. Publisher’s monogram in cartouche, in the blind, on all covers. Labeled “Ticknor & Co.”, in gilt at foot of spine. Bookplate of James Douglas on front pastedowns, with his number on bookplates and on an early page of each volume. Published in England in 1861, this expanded American Edition was issued in 1862. Alexis de Tocqueville (1805–1859), trained as a lawyer, was a great sociological thinker, whose “Democracy in America” (1835, 1840) is arguably the most penetrating view of American society and democracy of the century. At his death he was working on “The Old Regime and the Revolution”. His literary collaborator on some of his work was Gustave de Beaumont, who assembled the material for these volumes, which included unpublished works and extracts of diaries of Tocqueville and others, as well as Tocqueville’s memoirs and letters. Wear at ends of spines and at corners. Else, Very Good
Price: $295.00

6566
Dusenbery, B. M. (Compiler). Monument to the Memory of General Andrew Jackson: Containing Twenty-Five Eulogies and Sermons Delivered on the Occasion of His Death. To Which Is Added an Appendix, Containing General Jackson’s Proclamation, His Farewell Address, and A Certified Copy of His Last Will. The Whole Preceded by a Short Sketch of His Life. Philadelphia. Walker & Gillis. 1846 Portrait Frontispiece. First Edition. 412 pp. 6to. Brown publisher's cloth with gilt titling on spine Wise & Cronin #255 ( Also Cites Another Edition, S. Hanna, Troy, as Publisher, 1846). Eulogies by Bancroft, Butler, et al. Biographical Sketch and Important Jacksonian Documents Browned and foxing, especially of preliminaries. Ends of spine worn, corners bumped, covers stained with hinges starting externally at ends. An early signature shaken
Price: $125.00

9494
Peabody, Joel. R., M.B.- A World of Wonders; or Divers Developments, Showing the Thorough Triumph of Animal Magnetism in New England. Illustrated by the Power of Prevision in Mrs. Matilda Fox, and the Point of the Pencil by D. C. Johnston Boston. Robert S.Davis. 1838. With 7 illustrations by D[avid] C[laypool] Johnston. Third Edition. 158 pp. 12mo in 6's. One quarter brown calf with glt titling and ruling on spine , and printed paper covered boards. M. Johnson, D. C.Johnston, AAS, 1970. A witty and interesting work of the imagination, revealing charming discoveries about real and imagined worlds though the medium of Mrs. Fox, whose descriptive powers are unfettered by animal magnetism. Half the book is an early work of science fiction, with descriptions of lunar, Saturnian and asteroidal geography, inhabitants and behavior. There are seven illustrations by D. C. Johnston, called by Clarence Brigham "The American Cruikshank." Johnston (1798–1865), an artist, engraver and lithographer shows his skill as a humorist and his great imagination especially in the science fiction illustrations of this volume. The author claims to be a Fellow of the College of 'Pothecaries. Wear at corners and edges of boards and abrasion of printed covers. Inscription in ink on front and rear free end papers. Penciled calculations on rear pastedown. Scattered foxing and water staining. Margin trimmed on one illustration. Else, tight and Good + text and illustrations.
Price: $525.00

9821
Hersey, John.- Hiroshima. New York. The New Yorker Magazine. 1946. First Edition. 68 pp. 8 1/2" x 11 1/2" Original colored illustrated magazine covers. The first appearance of "Hiroshima ," published as the entire issue of The New Yorker for Aug. 31, 1946. This was the first time in history that an entire issue of a magazine was devoted to a single article. The New York Times Book Review calls this the best of the books that have been written about the most spectacular explosion in human experience. John Hersey, a novelist whose subjects are events of contemporary history , visited Hiroshima in 1946 and interviewed survivors of the first atomic bomb attack. The six survivors he wrote about detailed their lives before and after the bomb, with personal assessment of their survival and subsequent illnesses and sorrow. It was a personally rewarding and a growth experience for Hersey. Also for his readers. Ex libris with modest stamp on front cover. Shaken. Browning of pages. Cover hinge starting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $200.00

10534
[McHenry, James].- Meredith; or, The Mystery of the Meschienza. A Tale of the American Revolution. By the Author of “The Betrothed of Wyoming.” Philadelpha. Henry H. Porter. 1831. Second Edition. 260 pp. 12mo. Tan linen spine on tan paper covered boards. Printed paper label on spine Wright 1754. BAL 13593 (3 copies listed). AmImp #31-8064 McHenry was an Irish immigrant in 1817 who settled in Pennsylvania. He was a poet and novelist. In 1823, McHenry published “The Wilderness; or Braddock’s Times”(published in England as “The Youthful Days of Washington” by “Solomon Second-sight) (Howes M110). Washington was the hero of the novel. In its preface, McHenry wrote to the reader that “you will naturally feel to know who I am, to inform you, under the stipulation of profound secrecy, that I am by profession a book-worm, and by name, Your humble servant, Solomon Secondsight. In addition to his admiration of Washington, McHenry admired Andrew Jackson, writing in 1829, a continuation of Walsh’s biography of Jackson in “The Jackson Wreath” and a poem “Dirge to the Memory of Mrs. Jackson” in the same volume. Mild soiling of boards. Mld foxing. Lacks lower corner of pp. 143/4 without loss of text. Spine label intact. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10535
[McHenry, James].- Meredith; or, The Mystery of the Meschienza. A Tale of the American Revolution. By the Author of “The Betrothed of Wyoming.” Philadelpha. Henry H. Porter. 1831. Second Edition. 260 pp. 12mo. Tan linen spine on tan paper covered boards. Printed paper label on spine Wright 1754. BAL 13593 (3 copies listed). AmImp #31-8064 McHenry was an Irish immigrant in 1817 who settled in Pennsylvania. He was a poet and novelist. In 1823, McHenry published “The Wilderness; or Braddock’s Times”(published in England as “The Youthful Days of Washington” by “Solomon Second-sight) (Howes M110). Washington was the hero of the novel. In its preface, McHenry wrote to the reader that “you will naturally feel to know who I am, to inform you, under the stipulation of profound secrecy, that I am by profession a book-worm, and by name, Your humble servant, Solomon Secondsight. In addition to his admiration of Washington, McHenry admired Andrew Jackson, writing in 1829, a continuation of Walsh’s biography of Jackson in “The Jackson Wreath” and a poem “Dirge to the Memory of Mrs. Jackson” in the same volume. Mild soiling of boards. Mld foxing. Lacks lower corner of pp. 143/4 without loss of text. Spine label intact. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

10536
Adams, Hannah.- A Narrative of the Controversy between the Rev. Jedidiah Morse, D.D. and the Author. Boston. Cummings and Hilliard, Bradford and Read, and Isaiah Thomas, Jun. 1814. First Edition. 42 pp. 12mo. Disbound. Sewn. AmImp #30627. DAB. Printed by John Eliot. Hannah Adams(1755–1831), a distant cousin of President John Adams. was unschooled but profoundly self-taught; she was the first American woman (and possibly man, too) to earn her living by her pen. In the Revolutionary War, she had supported her father, an improvident book-lover and failed book-dealer, by making lace and tutoring; she, in turn, was tutored by students living in her home. Most of her publications were on comparative religion and were purchased widely in both American and London editions. She wrote an extensive History of New England (1798) and contemplated an abridgement (published in 1805) for use in the schools, but she was anticipated by Rev. Jedidiah Morse, who managed to publish his work for the schools first. Adams’s sales suffered and there was bitterness in the rivalry as Morse was accused of pirating his short work from her larger edition. Prominent Bostonians, motivated by admiration of Adams and antipathy to the reactionary Morse, precipitated a public controversy over the matter, in which Morse conducted himself so poorly as to lose all public support. Adams herself took little part in the public controversy. An annuity was established for her and she continued to publish on religion. Her memoir appeared posthumously in 1832. (DAB). This pamphlet is Adams’s explanation of the controversy in response to Morse’s attack in “An Appeal to the Public...” (1814). Covers soiled.Number stamed on last page. Minimal foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $375.00

10537
Mather, Cotton.- Essays to Do Good, Addressed to All Christians, Whether in Public or Private Capacities. Bu the Late Cotton Mather, D. D. F. R. S. A New Edition, Improved by George Burder. From the Latest Boston and London Editions. To Which Are Added, Treatises, on Engagements, Religious Education and Sanctifying the Sabbath-Day. Johnstown. Asa Child. 1815. A New Edition. 195 pp. + table of Contents 12mo. Full contemporary calf. AmImp #35227, Holmes 112E. “The Essay to Do Good” was originally published by Cotton Mather (1663–1728) in 1710. Here it is slightly edited to bring the language into the “modern” form (1807) by the editor. Several essays not by Mather are added in this edition. Overall, a nice edition of Mather’s important essay. Uncommon. Lacks both front and back cover. spine present. Owner’s signature (”Eli Purdy/1833”) on front free end paper. Chips from corner of front free end paper and title page without loss of text.. Edges browned. Else Very Good.
Price: $115.00

10538
Ashburner, John, M.D.- Facts and Observations on the Mesmeric and Magnetic Fluids. Offprint from The Zoist: A Journal of Cerebral Physiology and Mesmerism, April, 1846 London. Walton and Mitchell. 1846. First Edition. 16 pp. 8vo. Buff printed paper wraps. John Ashburner (1793–1878) was a noted English physician and authority on animal magnetism and spiritualism. In this seminal paper, which is a paradigm of contemporary “scientific mesmerism’, Ashburner uses his presumably physiologic experiments with subjects being mesmerized to infer that a mesmeric fluid passes from the mesmerizer to the object, typically from either the eyes or the hands, and that this fluid behaves like magnetic fluids which he infers to be the agency of magnetic effects. He discusses this in relation to various phrenological characteristics and to sundry therapeutic results. Ashburner, further, appeals to prior evidence of experiments with mesmerized metals and with the Okey girls, whose fraudulent behavior was later exposed and, as a result, mesmeric experiments banned from the pages of “The Lancet”. In 1861, he was visited by the American medium and rapper (since age 14), Charles Foster (1828–1904), later Governor of Ohio and Secretary of the Treasury (1891–3) to Benjamin Harrison. With Foster, Ashburner witnessed materialization of nine hands above the dining room table and a levitation of Foster and the piano on which he was playing. Dickens, Thackeray and other literary notables had sittings with Foster, who was later exposed as a fraud and died of alcoholism and dementia whose origins preceded his stint in the US cabinet. Ashburner also wrote the preface and notes to Baron Charles von Reichenbach’s 1850 treatise on experiments on magnetism and physical forces, and their relations to the Vital Force, (the volume was dedicated to John Elliotson), in which they touch on somnambulism. phrenology, clairvoyance and hallucinations. The Zoist was founded in 1843 by Elliotson (1791–1868), a noted physician, the first user of a stethoscope in Britain, who resigned his professorship when mesmerism was banned by the Royal Medical societies. Elliotson was a mesmerist, held scéances and founded The Phrenological Society. He was late to espouse Spiritualism, but then had a conversion to Christianity; he subsequently reconciled with Ashburner, from whom he had been earlier estranged because of Ashburner’s adoption of Spiritualism. Covers soiled. Owner’s signature (”E. Hussey”) on front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

10541
[Pamphlet]. [Jewett,Charles C.].- The Close of the Late Rebellion in Rhode Island. An Extract from a Letter by A Massachusetts Man Resident in Providence. Providence, R. I. B. Cranston & Co. 1842. First Edition, 16 pp. 8vo. Removed. Self-covered. Sewn. Gettleman, “The Dorr Rebellion”, pp. 116–7, Note 37. Mowry, 176, ff. AmImp 42–2672. The Dorr War was the most dramatic and angry political battle in America before the Civil War. It began as an attempt to ceate political reform in Rhode Island, a state which still operated under a 17th century charter with restrictive voting privileges. Residues of the radical spirit of the American Revolution stimulated efforts to expand the suffrage, as the Industrial Revolution led to decline in property ownership and loss of voting rights. This pressure grew and in the early 1840’s became a radical movement under Thomas Wilson Dorr. A People’s Convention elected Dorr Governor, in opposition to the Charter-elected Governor King. Dorr, in May, 1842 went to Washington to seek government help for his movement from President Tyler, Daniel Webster and others, without success. He had earlier sent Burrington Anthony, former US Marshal, to seek this help. On Dorr’s return, hoping for support from New York, he untruthfully promised the citizens such help as he marched in front of a crowd of 1000, 300 of them armed, with a military band blaring in front. He addressed the large crowd, unsheathed a sword and promised violent retribution. This parade helped radicalize the movement and armed conflict later broke out. The rebels were subsequently suppressed and Dorr imprisoned. The parade was a turning point in the rebellion and is best described in this anonymous pamphlet prematurely announcing the end of the rebellion, published by Charles C. Jewett. Jewett “was librarian of Brown University, a center of anti-Dorr sentiment. University President Francis Wayland and William G. Goddard , Professor of Moral Philosophy, were both ardent anrti-Dorrites.” (Gettleman) Mild foxing. Else, Very Good. Uncommon.
Price: $365.00

10542
Fowler, Prof. O[rson] S[quire].- Matrimony, As Taught by Phrenology and Physiology. In Three Parts. Part I. – Love: Its Nature, Laws and All-Controlling Power over Human destiny. Part II. – Selection: or, Mutual Adaptation. Part III. – Courtship and Married Life: Ther Fatal Errors, and How to Render All Marriages Happy. Boston. O. S. Fowler Publications. 1859. Phrenological map of head after title page. First Edition. 472 pp. + 4 pp. catalogue of Fowler’s Works at rear and 4 pp. catalogue of phrenologic works at front. 12mo. Green publisher’s cloth embossed in the blind. Gilt titling on spine. Yellow end papers. Not in Cooter. See Cooter, 425.1c for later British edition of Fowler’s earlier book (AmImp 42-1847) on the same subject. A more developed version of Fowler’s earlier 1840’s book n the same subject. The author states that his book provides the best counsel on matrimony, since it is derived from the principles of Phrenology, which is an “analysis of man’s social faculties.” Much space is devoted to sexuality and amativeness and to the significance of love to man as a social being. Marriage is based on a combination of social faculties, which are discussed in detail as factors in the success or failure of marriage. The mutuality of these qualities constitutes marriage. O. S. Fowler (1809–1887) was a graduate (in divinity) of Amherst in 1834, a classmate and pupil of phrenology with Henry Ward Beecher. He lectured with his brother , Lorenzo, on phrenology , established a publishing firm and put out The Phrenological Almanac and The American Phrenological Journal & Miscellany. Slight soiling of covers. Minimal wear at ends of spine and corners. Else, Very Good +.
Price: $150.00

10544
Potter, Wm. B., M.D.- The Physiological and Phrenological Developments of [Allyn D. Schatz?] as Given by Wm. B. Potter, M. D. N.P. [US] Wm. B. Potter, M.D. N.D. [ca. 1840]. Probably First Edition. 16 pp. 32mo (2 1/2” x 3 1/2”) Blue plain paper wraps. Not in American Imprints or Cooter. A small chapbook to record the phrenological assessment of the recorded subject by the examiner, Dr. Wm. B. Potter. Dr. Potter also suggests in this printed booklet that he also offers advice on business, matrimony and phrenology as well as vocational guidance, all in confidence, of course. Yet subjects are invited to bring along children and friends, business and conjugal partners to learn how best to deal with them. He provides scores for the various phrenological properties as well as brief definitions of these qualities. Dr. Potter promises 40 closely written pages in a report for fees one-half those charged by the Fowlers in New York. The chapbook is judged to be American from internal evidence, idiom and spelling. Slight wrinkling ans soiling of covers. Some pencillings on charts. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

10551
Green, Frances Harriet McDougall (or Williams, Mrs. Catherine B.) (pseud.: A Rhode Islander).- Might and Right. Providence. A. H. Stillwell. 1844. Frontispiece Portrait of Thomas Wilson Dorr. First Edition. 324 pp. 6to. Brown publisher's cloth. Gilt titling on spine. Covers embossed in the blind. Sabin 48898. Not in American Imprints or Bartlett. DAB re Authorship. A sympathetic review of the Dorrites and their political movement for democracy in Rhode Island; especially important for discussion of the constitutional issues of legislative authority as allegedly derived from King Charles's Charter of 1663. Along with Mowry's modern history, a cornerstone of Dorr Collections. This Second Edition has added material in an Appendix entitled "A Sketch of the Life and Character of Thomas Wilson Dorr." Copy of Edward G. Slocum. Chips from Spine at Head and Tail. Corners Worn and Bumped. Foxing of Preliminaries. Text Tight and Very Good. Bright Gilt Title on Spine Overall, a Very Good copy.
Price: $175.00

10552
Dusenbery, B. M. (Compiler). Monument to the Memory of General Andrew Jackson: Containing Twenty-Five Eulogies and Sermons Delivered on the Occasion of His Death. To Which Is Added an Appendix, Containing General Jackson’s Proclamation, His Farewell Address, and A Certified Copy of His Last Will. The Whole Preceded by a Short Sketch of His Life. Philadelphia. Walker & Gillis. 1846 Portrait Frontispiece. First Edition. 412 pp. 6to. Brown publisher's cloth with gilt titling on spine Wise & Cronin #255 ( Also Cites Another Edition, S. Hanna, Troy, as Publisher, 1846). Eulogies by Bancroft, Butler, et al. Biographical Sketch and Important Jacksonian Documents Browned and foxing, especially of preliminaries. Ends of spine worn, corners bumped, covers stained with hinges starting externally at ends. An early signature shaken
Price: $125.00

10553
Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr.- The Age of Jackson. Boston. Little, Brown & Company 1945. First Edition. 577 pp. 8vo. Green publisher's cloth with gilt ruling and titling on cover and spine. D.J. T.e.g. Soiling of page ends. Mild wear and soiling of covers. Else, Very Good. D.J. Poor with chips and missing pieces and tears, but almost all text present.
Price: $50.00

10554
Burke, Edmund.- The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, In Twelve Volumes. Volume II [Only], On Conciliation with America; Security of the Independence of Parliament; On Mr. Fox’s East India Bill, etc. Beaconsfield Edition. Boston. Little, Brown and Company. 1901. Frontispiece engraving of Trinity College, Dublin. Engraved title page with vignette illustration of Bristol in 1774. Printed title page in red and black. Illustrated. Beaconsfield Edition, Limited to 1000 sets. Copt No. 20 576 pp. 8vo. Three Quarters brown morocco on blue marbled boards and end papers. T.e.g. Page ends at foot and at fore untrimmed and uncut. Green ribbon page marker. Edmund Burke’s speeches and essays. Single volume of a de luxe set, containing his most famous essay in support of America, seeking conciliation at the time of the Revolution (March 22, 1775) as well as his prior (April 19, 1774) important speech on American Taxation. In this latter, he shows the hypocrisy of British taxation of the American colonies, especially the tax on tea, and the course adopted by Britain, which was leading to “loss of peace, of union and of commerce, but even of revenue...” Moderate wear at head, tail and edges of spine and at corners. Modest owner’s stamp on half-title and on title. Else , Very Good +.
Price: $195.00

10577
[Sheet Music]. Russell, Henry (Music) and Morris, George P[ope] (Words).- Woodman! Spare That Tree! A Ballad, the Poetry by George P. Morris, Esq. by Whom the Song Is Dedicated to Benjamin M. Brown, Esq. The Music Composed by Henry Russell. New York. Firth & Hall. 1846–7. Cover Illustrated and signed (in the stone) by Fleetwood. Twelfth Edition. 7 pp. Fo. Disbound. Illustrated and decorated cover. BAL 14543. Ewen, Pop.Am.Comp., pp.148–50. Appleton's Cycl. Am. Biog. Concise DNB. Dichter, Handbook, #1823. Groce and Walace, pp. 213 (Endicott), 230–231 (Fleetwood). According to Dichter and to BAL, the words were copied from the New York Mirror. The cover illustration, a lithograph, portrays a country scene of a house and an old well. A man in city clothes addresses a man with an axe. A weathercock is present on the roof of the shed in the vignette. The illustration is enclosed by a border with elaborate corners. A letter from Morris (1802–1864), editor of the New York Mirror, to Russell is printed on p. 3, before the music (in earliest editions, the letter was on p. 2). The composer, Henry Russell (1812–1900) was born in England of Jewish parentage. He studied with Bellini and knew Rossini, Donizetti and Meyerbeer. To seek his fortune he moved to America from 1833 to 1841, where his income came from his concerts (piano and voice recitals), not from his immensely popular sheet music, for which he received no royalties. Among his famous works are this,"Woodman! Spare That Tree!", "The Indian Hunter", "That Old Gang of Mine", etc. He championed social causes, reform of mental asylums and temperance. He was closely associated with "The Musical Bouquet. The cover lithography was done by Anthony Fleetwood, who was also born in England ca. 1800 and was active in New York from 1827 to 1847, when he moved to Cincinnati, where he established a family dynasty of lithographers. Dichter and BAL ascribe the lithography of the earliest editions to [George] Endicott, who founded another family dynasty of lithographers, originally in Baltimore with Moses Swett, but active in New York 1831–1845. While this work is not listed specifically in Peters (America on Stone) under either Endicott or Fleetwood, Peters does call the work of Fleetwood scarce and excellent (p. 189). Endicott is similarly admired by Peters (p. 179). Originally published in 1837, this copy is dated from the publisher’s address. Mildly foxed. Else, Very Good.
Price: $150.00

10586
Woolman, John. The Journal of John Woolman. Boston. James R. Osgood and Company. 1871. First Edition,as Such. 315 pp. 8vo. Brick red publisher's cloth with gilt decorations. Beveled boards. Coated brown end papers. Currier, p. 117. Howes II, W669. BAL, 21891. Journal of an 18th C. Anti-Slavery Quaker. He Visited Rhode Island in 1760 and Contributed Greatly to the Ending of Slavery There, at Least among Quakers. Woolman's Influence Extended Well beyond Quakers. He Wrote Extensively on Uncompensated Labor as Well as Slavery and Argued for Retrospective Compensation to Emancipated Slaves. He published a famous two-part essay entitled "Some Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes, 1754 and 1762. Howes considered the Journal "an autobiographical masterpiece." Ex libris (Sunday School) with owner’s signature on title page. part of bookplate on front pastedown and part of paper label on spine. Otherwise Very Good.
Price: $125.00

6404
Casey, Brig.-Gen. Silas.- [By Authority.] Infantry Tactics, for the Instruction, Exercise and Manoevres of the Soldier, a Company, Line of Skirmishers, Battallion, Brigade, or Corps D’Armée. Vol. III [only]. Evolutions of a Brigade and Corps D’Armée. New York. D. Van Nostrand. 1862. Illustrated. 29 folding plates. First Edition. 183 pp. + 6 pp. publisher’s catalogue at rear. Small 12mo. Green embossed publisher’s cloth. Embossed in gilt on spine with gilt titling and eagle. Embossed in the blind on both covers with rules and American Eagle, shield and stars. Civil War military manual. A single volume of a 3 volume work. Bookseller’s tag (Washington, DC) on front pastedown. Lacks front free flyleaf. Hinges cracked internally. Wear at ends of spine and corners. Foxing. Owner’s name inked on front edge of text block. Few scattered ink marks. Else, Good+.
Price: $135.00

6464
Cooper, Brevet Captain S. A Concise System of Instructions and Regulations for the Militia and Volunteers of the United States, Comprehending the Exercises and Movements of the Infantry, Light Infantry, and Riflemen; Cavalry and Artillery: together with the Manner of Doing Duty i Philadelphia Robert P. DeSilver 1836 Numerous illustrations. First Edition 282 pp. + 4 pp. recommendations. 12mo. Brown publisher’s cloth. Printed paper label on spine Am. Imp. 36933. A substantial manual of military manoeuvres and drills. It may be built upon Winfield Scott’s “Abstract of Infantry Tactics” of 1830. Each of the four parts is also separately paginated: 128, 48, 35, 70 pp. A large number of pages of drum beats and bugle calls are included. Owner’s signature, dated 1841, in ink on front pastedown. A large number of pages of drum beats and bugle calls are included. 4 pages of endorsements at front. 2 small chips from lower edge of label. Mild wear at edges of footElse, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

6527
[ Pamphlet]. De Peyster, J. Watts.- Practical Strategy, as Illustrated by the Achievements of the Austrian Field Marshal Traun. Frederick the Great’s Preceptor in the Art of War. Catskill, NY. Joseph Joesbury, “Journal Office”. 1863. First American Edition 64 pp. 8vo. Pink printed paper wraps. Inspired by the difficulty of Lincoln in finding an active, successful general for the Union Army, the author, a military historian, reviews the practical precepts of Field Marshal Traun, tutor to Frederick the Great, and other military authorities in an attempt to elicit the core of their practical and successful teaching. List of references and errata on inside of rear cover. The outside of the rear cover contains the author’s exhortium to the populace hoping to evoke a leader like Traun to lead the country out of the rebellion and tyranny of the Civil War. Lower right corner off front cover, not involving text. Fading of covers. Chips from spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

7014
[Worcester, Noah] (pseudonym: Philo Pacificus).- The Friend of Peace, in a Series of Numbers: Together with a Solemn Review of the Custom of War as an Introduction to Said Work. Ballston Spa. J. Comsock. 1822. Full contemporary calf. Red leather label on spine with gilt titling and gilt ruling. ? First Edition. 308 pp. (continuous pagination) 12mo. Cushing, p. 232. Separate title pages for “The Friend of Peace” and “A Solemn Review of the Custom of War; Showing that War Is the Effect of Popular Delusion, and Proposing a Remedy”. Contains an interview between the President of the United States and an Officer, Omar, who had been dismissed for dueling. Pacifist. anti-dueling, anti-war. Engages arguments about slavery and its abolition, pro-war sentiments of authorities, the French-English war, Napoleon’s Russian engagements, etc. Originally published in 1817. Wear of covers, especially at corners and ends of spine. Foxed with staining of some pages and ends. Owner’s signatures on front free end paper (Henry H. Cranes) and on front second end paper (Annie Greene). Lacks triangular piece from lower edge of first title page encroaching only on text of biblical quotation near foot of page. Else Good+.
Price: $150.00

7115
Scott, Winfield.- Abstract of Infantry Tactics; including Exercises and Manoeuvres of Light Infantry and Riflemen; for Use of the Militia of the United States. Boston. Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins. 1830. Illustrated with 30 plates, including 2 folding plates. First Edition. 138 pp. 12mo. Full contemporary calf. Am. Imp. 3801. Published for the War Department under Congressional Authority. Covers and front free flyleaf detached (and worn), but present. Most of backstrip lacking. Foxing. Small water stain at foot of early pages. Plate XXX and half of Plate XI are lacking. Owner’s signature, dated 1832, at rear. Few pencil markings. Overall, a poor copy.
Price: $65.00

8126
[Broadsheet].- Philadelphia Riots; or, I Guess It Wasn't De Niggas Dis Time. Philadelphia. J[oseph] Torr. [1844]. First Edition. 2pp. on 1 leaf. 6 1/2” x 9 5/8” Loose broadsheet In John Hay Library (at Brown University) Broadside Collection, HB39189 PA. Not in AAS. On May 3–10, 1844, there were anti-Catholic riots in Kensington, just outside Philadelphia. In this civil unrest Catholic churches were destroyed by fire. According to the” Pennsylvania Freeman”, n. 14 of July 18, 1844, 15 people were killed and 50 wounded. This broadsheet is a poem in dialect to the tune of "It'll Neber Do to Gib It up," exculpating Blacks from causing the Riot of 1844, placing the blame on Nativists and the opposing Irish. Ostensibly, the Nativists (Native American Party) were frightened by the prospects of excessive Catholic influence on prayers and Bible passages in public schools. However, likely the root cause was fear by the Nativists that the Irish would join the abolitionists to overthrow the institution of slavery. The “Freeman” chastises Philadelphia as being the strongest pro-slavery supporter of the South. The Irish, in fact, never joined the abolitionist camp. The Governor and the Attorney General also get roasted here, with a slur at newsmen who kept the riot going because they earned more money from it. The riots were stopped by government troops. The obverse has Whig songs, "Clay and Frelinghuysen", to the tune of "Yankee Doodle," and "The Whig Chief" by J[ohn] H[enry] Warland (1807–1872), campaign songs for the Whig candidates. Two small spots of foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

8769
Adams, William L.- A Melodrame Entitled "Treason, Stratagems, and Spoils." Hamden, CT. Archon Books for the Yale University Library. 1968. Comic frontispiece , facsimile of the title page and 3 other comic illustrations. First Edition. 163 pp. 8vo. Blue publisher's cloth with Illustrated D.J. A melodrama, written in verse in 1852, satirizing the Democratic Party leadership in Oregon at that time. They were written by William Lysander Adams of the Portland "Oregonian," who signed the articles "Junius," as he did a satirical Carrier's Address in the "Oregonian" also in 1852. Published originally serially in the "Oregonian," the parts were later collected in a pamphlet with few changes. The title is derived from "The Merchant of Venice" (Act V, Scene 1), also quoted by Carlyle. The play was attributed to "Breakspear." Adams was probably the best read Oregonian of his time and the play was a best seller at the frontier. A long introduction by Belknap discusses the setting in Oregon, the plot, the local patois, the Mormon themes and the author in some detail. A fascinating document from the pioneer West in America with the added insights of a modern scholar. Notes and Index are useful. Top edge of D.J. chipped. with no textual loss. Minimal foxing of page ends and end papers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $50.00

10445
Scott, Winfield.- Abstract of Infantry Tactics; including Exercises and Manoeuvres of Light Infantry and Riflemen; for Use of the Militia of the United States. Boston. Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins. 1830. First Edition. 138 pp. 12mo. Full contemporary calf. Gilt rulings on spine. Am. Imp. 3801 Published for the War Department under Congressional Authority. An important manual of Infantry tactics, especially designed for militias of the United States by a committee headed by General Winfield Scott (1786–1886). Scott served prominently in the War of 1812 and the Mexican War. He was still a force in the Civil War. On the dedication page, adjacent to the Scott listing is a holographic (? contemporary) signature in ink of Winfield Scott, not likely to be a signature by the General himself, according to my comparison with an authentic Scott signature. In Catalog No. 938 (p.12) of Lone Star Autographs is a quotation from an ALS by Scott reporting in 1835, that he had then received a Bank draft for $3000 “in part compensation for preparing and publishing a work on Tactics”. Few horticultural annotations in pencil on rear free endpaper. Mild foxing. Browning of end papers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

10479
Goddard, William G[iles].- An Address to the People of Rhode-Island, Delivered in Newport, on Wednesday, May 3, 1843, in Presence of the General Assembly, on the Occasion of the Change in the Civil Government of Rhode-Island, by Adoption of the Constitution, Which Superseded the Charter of 1663. Providence, RI. Knowles and Vose. 1843. First Edition. 80 pp. 8vo. Printed paper self wraps. Disbound. Sabin 27647. Am Imp 43-2120. Gettleman, 45n, 117n. DiSimone & Schofield, Broadsides of the Dorr Rebellion, 183. A defense of the Constitutional Convention and the new “Freemen’s” constitution of Rhode Island against the People’s Convention (the Dorr Rebellion) by a professor of moral philosophy at Brown University (also a legislator and journalist). He bases his argument on a respect for the rule of law. Goddard elsewhere ridiculed the People’s Convention and Constitution in Providence Journal articles under the pseudonym “Town Born”. Goddard, along with President (of Brown) Francis Wayland, was a vigorous anti-Dorrite. This copy bears the notation: ”from Wilkins Updike”. Updike was the author of “Memoirs of the Rhode-Island Bar in 1842 and also the history of the Episcopal Church in RI. A Whig and member of the Constitutional Convention, an opponent of Dorr’s People’s Convention, he was an unsuccessful candidate for US Congress. Ex libris with withdrawal stamp. Mildly foxed. Water stain at leading edge of early pages. Else, Very Good.
Price: $160.00

10483
[US Government Document] Memorial of Auctioneers of Providence. Doc. No. 81. Ho. of Rep. 20th Congress, 2d Session. Washington, DC. Gales & Seaton, Printers to House of Reps. 1829. First Edition. 2 pp. 8vo. Disbound. A bill had been introduced into Co ngress to tax all sales at auction punitively, in effect to prohibit such sales.. The petitioners, from Rhode Island, argued that it was a matter for the States to decide: such a bill, if passed, would fall unequally on different States. The petitioners go on to argue that auctions are “the most open, fair, undeceptive, and satisfactory mode of transferring property”. The majority of goods sold at auction in Rhode Island were of foreign origin and the duties imposed by the State on such sales were used to support public schools. Auctions, they argue, relieve the consumer of the burden of supporting middle men, effectively lowering costs to consumers. This form of free trade is alleged to be opposed by competitors in business and does not interfere with Federal responsibilities in regulating foreign or interstate commerce. The proposed bill is a tax unrelated to any national census, but a direct tax upon only some states and upon only one legal occupation regulated and operated fairly for the public good. The bill (H.R. No. 361) was referred to the Committee of the Whole House for consideration. These same arguments have recently been restated in consideration of contemporary issues invoked by free trade agreements. Rear cover detached. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

10484
[US Government Document] Doc. No. 82. Ho. of Rep. 20th Congress, 2d Session. Act of the Legislature of the State of North Carolina. Incorporating the Roanoke Inlet Company, and for Other Purposes Washington, DC. Gales & Seaton, Printers to House of Reps. 1829. First Edition. 5 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Self wraps. This report to Congress refers to two North Carolina Acts: the first, in 1821, incorporates the Roanoke Inlet Company and charges it with opening an inlet at Nagg’s Head at lower Albermarle Sound, to improve the navigation of the Sound, the area surrounding Ocracock Inlet of the Outer Banks, charging the company to meet at Edmonton, permitting subscription for shares of value at least $150,000 for purchasing lands and creating embankments and charging fees based on tonnage of ships navigating the inlet; the second Act of 1828 amended the first, requiring completion in 10 years. Recognizing that these actions require US Congressional approval, the documents were referred to the House of Representatives and to the Committee on Roads and Canals for consideration. Very Good.
Price: $75.00

10494
[Broadside Song Sheet]. [Hunt, George W.].- Up in a Balloon. New York. Henry de Marsan. N.D. [ca.1865–69] First Edition. 1p. 6 1/2” W x10” H Loose sheet. Hay-Harris Coll., HB 16797. AAS, Ballads U65i 01. An entertaining song of interplanetary voyaging printed as a broadside. The first line is: “One night, I went up in a balloon”; the story concerns a voyage through the galaxy in a balloon, a trip which turns out to be a dream caused by overeating. Published by Henry de Marsan of New York [active ca. 1865]. There is no date, but it likely gives its title to R. M. DeWitt’s “Up in a Balloon Songster”, DeWtt’s Song & Joke Book #66, dated 1869. The song, which according to AAS was written by George W. Hunt (1839–1904), ca. 1865–70. This copy was published by A. W. Auner of Philadelphia (at its address 1865–74). The poem is surrounded by an arabesque border illustrated with a woman in tears on the left, a contented man on the right and a uniformed man above blowing a bugle, all as described for the Hay-Harris item, also published by de Marsan. The tune for this song was used by Benjamin F. Butler as a campaign song in his political efforts in Massachusetts in the 1870–80’s (Hay-Harris HB4084 MA). Top edge with chips and tears, not involving text or images. Lacks 2” (on a side) triangular corner on lower right, encroaching only on lower corner of arabesque border. Few creases from old folds. Else, Very Good.
Price: $235.00

6356
Branagan, Thomas.- Avenia, or a Tragical Poem, on the Oppression of the Human Species; and Infringement of the Rights of Man. In Five Books. With Notes Explanatory and Miscellaneous. Witten in Imitation of Homer's Iliad. -A New Edition- To Which Is Added the Constitution of the State of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. J, Cline. 1810. New (? Second) Edition. 324 pp. 16mo. Full contemporary calf. Gilt ruling on spine and gilt titling on red leather label. AI 19627, HSP/LCP Afro-Americana 1478. Sabin 7375 (for First Edition). Wegelin 878. James Basker, "Amazing Grace:, An Anthology of Poems about Slavery 1660-1810 (Yale). Not in Howes. An epic anti-slavery poem , written just after the American Revolution. Bookplate of James Coe on front pastedown and his signature dated 1813 on front free end paper. Includes "A Brief Acccount of the Bettering-House in Philadelphia", a racially integrated, Quaker-run hospital, as well as the constitution of Pennsylvania. Baranagan (1774-1843), an Irish slave trader and slave owner in the West Indies, repented and moving to America, wrote novelson the slave trade. His "The Penitential Tyramt" (autobiographical) and "Avenia" (first published 1805) were part of his strong statement about slavery. These two were kept by Thomas Jefferson in his library after Branagan sent him copies. This is a very good copy of a scarce item. Covers scuffed and chipped at the spine. Front hinge starting. Browning and foxing of text. Lacks frontispiece, but has frontispiece description. Else, Very Good.
Price: $450.00

7295
Turner, George, and Burges, W. S.- Report of the Trial of Thomas Wilson Dorr, for Treason; Including the Testimony at Length, Arguments of Counsel-The Charge of the Chief Justice-The Motions and Arguments on the Questions of a New Trial and in Arrest of Judgement: together with the Sentence of the Court, and the Speech of Mr. Dorr before Sentence. From Notes Taken at the Trial. Providence. B. F. Moore 1844 First Edition. 115 pp. + errata. 12mo. Tan printed paper wraps. Sabin 20649. The transcript of the trial of Thomas W. Dorr for his leadership of the rebellion which followed his election as Governor of Rhode Island by the People's Convention, set up after Dorr's efforts to change the political system failed. This convention and election were in protest to the limited (to property owners) franchise in the State. Dorr was resisted by the conventionally elected Governor King, arrested. convicted and imprisoned. Extended franchise in Rhode Island, then still operating without a formal constitution on the colonial charter from King Charles, had to wait over 40 years for the changes proposed by Dorr. Turner and Burges were the defense attorneys. Front cover starting. Minimal foxing of rear cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $400.00

7479
[Pamphlet].- The Executive Acts of Ex-President Fillmore: with Reasons for HIs Election, and a Memoir of His Life and Administration. Accompanied with a Finely Executed Portrait on Steel, and a Sketch of the Life of Andrew Jackson Donelson, of Tennessee. New York. Edward Walker. 1856. First Edition 48 pp. including ads. 8vo. Pale yelllow printed paper wraps. Not in Sabin. A "pro-Union' Tract of the American Party. A plea to "Americans" for upport for Fillmore's candidacy on the American Party ticket. It claims to be pro-Union and in favor of immigration. Compromise is in its wind. A campaign biography and document of 1856 for the ticket of Fillmore and Donelson (of Tennessee), it reviews the political life and the statements of Fillmore. Covers and preliminaries soiled. Chips from front cover and from most of spine. Wrinkling of pages (? from former dampness). Else, Good +.
Price: $145.00

8201
Yates, Robert (comp.).- Secret Proceedings and Debates of the Convention Assembled at Philadelphia, in the Year 1787, for the Purpose of Forming a Constitution of the Unites States of America. From the Notes Taken by the Late Robert Yates, Esq., Chief Justice of New-York, and Copied by John Lansing, Jun. Esq. Late Chancellor of That State, Members of That Convention. Including "The Genuine Information," Laid before the Legislature of Maryland by Luther Martin, Esq. Then Attorney General of That State, and a Member of the Same Convention. Also, Other Historical Documents Relative to the Federal Compact of the North American Union. Albany. Websters and Skinners. 1821. First Edition. 308 pp. 8vo. Full contemporary calf. Gilt rulings and titling on red leather label on spine. Howes, III, Y3. Sabin 78749. DAB for Yates. Notes from the Constitutional Convention, exposing the process in its development and who said what. An important item of contemporary monitoring from our constitutional history. Yates (1738-1801) was a New York attorney who ultimately became Chief Justice of the New York Court. Like his rellative Abraham Yates, he was violently anti-Federalist and a strong opponent to Hamilton. His anti-Federalist diatribes were written over the signature "Brutus" (and others). Hamilton's participation in the writing of the Federalist papers may have been provoked, in part, by the spoken and written words of Yates. This volume was published by Yates's widow, 20 years after his death. Foxing, chiefly of preliminary pages. Offsetting of text. Front free flyleaf loosening at tail with front hinge starting internally. Head of title and page 1 of Preface clipped without any loss of text. Only slight wear to covers. Bookplate on front pastedown. A Very Good copy, outstanding for age and usual fragility of such items.
Price: $350.00

10313
Bingham, H[iram], Daniel Chamberlain, Samuel Whitney, Samuel Ruggles and Elisha Loomis.- Mission to the Sandwich Islands. In The Missionary Herald. Second Edition. Vol. XVII, No. 4, April, 1821, pp. 110-124 , and No. 5, May, 1821, pp. 129-143. Boston. Samuel T. Armstrong. 1821. First Edition. 32 pp., April issue, 40 pp. May issue.complete. 8vo. Gray printed paper wraps. B. Judd, Voyages to Hawaii before 1860. Here is an the first report by the missionaries to the Sandwich Islands, written by Hiram Bingham and others about their earliest experiences in Hawaii. This report was distilled from over 100 letters from missionaries and their journal from October, 1819 to July, 1820, all of which arrived in New York on the Ship Levant, out of China and Hawaii. The missionaries report on their arrival in Hawaii, their encounters with the natives, the beginning of their missionary work and its reception, their shock at polygamy and its incestuous consequences, the collapse of the Hawaiian government with the death of Tamehameha (Kamehameha), encounters at Kirooah (Kailua) and Mowee (Maui), the settlement of the gospel on the islands, the native customs (song and dance), and the missionary needs on Woahoo (Oahu). The second part takes up the settlement in Hanaroorah (Honolulu), Woahoo, the celebration of the Sabbath, the start of a school fund, the presentation of a copy of the book "Obookiah", pagan superstitions, and various visitations. An interesting first-hand compilation. The voyage of the Levant is not recorded in Judd, but the ship Thaddeus is. Both issues lack rear covers. Front covers chipped.
Price: $825.00

10315
Hitchcock, Enos.- A Discourse on the Dignity and Excellence of the Human Character: Illustrated in the Life of General George Washington, Late Commander of the Armies, and President of the United States. In Commemoration of the AfflictiveEvent of His Death. Delivered February 22, 1800, in the Benevolent Congregational Church in Providence; and Published by Request of That Society. Providence, RI. John Carter, Jun. 1800. First Edition. 32 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Stab sewn. Evans 37627. Sabin 32253. Alden 1673. A eulogy delivered by Enos Hitchcock, D.D. and member of the Society of the Cincinnati, about two monthsafter Wadshington's death Lacks covers and notes. Faint stain, probably from a small old label, on title page. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

10319
[Cogan, Thomas]. A Layman (pseudonym).- Letters to William Wilberforce, Esq. M.P. on the Doctrine of Hereditary Depravity. Boston. J. Nancrede (Evans, p. 406). Printed by Manning & Loring (Evans, p. 405). 1799 First Edition. 125 pp. +7 pp. publisher's catalogue. 12mo. in 6's. Tan sheep, ruled on spinre in gilt with gilt titling on black leather spine label. DNB. Shipton & Moolney 35318. William Wilberforce (1759-1833) was a Cambridge educated philanthropist, an early friend of William Pitt (later Prime Minister) and long time member of Parliament from a purchased borough. He was a fierce opponent of slavery and, beginning in1788, introduced bills for its abolition, repeatedly for years.He delivered stirring speeches in its support. His bills were all defeated, but in 1806, largely on another's bill, the slave trade was abolished. Four days before his death in 1833, slavery was finally completely abolished in Britain. Wilberforce was also an evangelical Christian. Thomas Cogan (1736-1818) was a philosopher, minister and physician (mostly in Holland till1795). He wrote novels, travel books, translations from the Dutch, treatises "on the passions", and commentaries on ethics. These critical letters take Wilberforce to task for his conservative Christianity, e.g., for attributing all defects of mankind to the fall of Adam, rather than to other causes, like heredity and the state of nature of man, common to all animals. Cogan appeals to a rational religion and the natural rationality of man. Truly a product of the Enlightenment. Lacks covers and end papers. Pages toned. A nicely printed very tight and clean issue. Very Good.
Price: $375.00

10321
Crew, Danny O.- Presidential Sheet Music. An Illustrated Catalogue of Published Music Associated with the American Presidency and Those Who Sought the Office. Jefferson, NC and London. McFarland & Co. 2001. Illustrated. First Edition. 800 pp. 8vo. Blue publisher's cloth with silver titling on spine and on front cover. A wonderfully indexed treatise on presidential music. Some of the details are discussed scantily, however, but it is a very useful discourse on the music associated with the American Presidency. As New.
Price: $45.00

10378
Fergurson (sic!), [? Ferguson,] Anna.- The Young Lady; or Guide to Knowledge, Virtue and Happiness. Nashua, NH. J. H. Fletcher. 1851. Second Edition. 128 pp. 3" x 4 5/8". Brown publisher's cloth with both covers embossed in gilt with a floral design.All pages ruled. At front is a presentation page also embossed in gilt. Spine with title and decoration embossed in the blind. A.e.g. A miniature book, original copyright 1848 and published then in Lowell by Dayton. An address to young women by Anna Ferguson(1778-1853), b. Orange County, NY, with homilies and parables and advice on conduct for women entering society. The author's husband was Elijah Hubbard Webster (1773-1854). Mild wear at corners. Mild foxing. Few minor stains. Pencil notation on presentation page: "Mary Drury from her sister Jane Drury". Else, Very Good.
Price: $85.00

10400
Bartlett, W. H.- The Pilgrim Fathers; or, Founders of New England in The Reign of James the First. London. T. Nelson and Sons. 1863. Copiously illustrated with 28 full-page plates (with tissue guards) engraved on steel, including frontispiece and engraved title page, and 31 woodcuts inserted into text. ?Third Edition. 230 pp. 8vo. Full brown tree calf, ruled in gilt and blind tooled along edges of covers. Rebacked in tan calf with gilt titling. A.e.g. Gilt dentelles. Brown coated end papers. Sabin 3789. W. H. Bartlett, one of the 19th century's great artists, engravers and authors of travel books, wrote and illustrated this grand production. Using early period documents in America, Holland and England, he traces the history of the Pilgrims in the 17th century. Because of religious intolerance under James I (1603-1625), the Puritans left England and after a stay in Leyden, Holland, they traveled to Boston, England, and then to America on the Mayflower, landing at Plymouth. Here the Massachusetts Bay Colony was founded and they endured much deprivation in their early settlements. Under some outstanding leaders and with help from Native Americans, until King Philip's War, they endured. Bartlett considers all these issues, as he considers especially the human elements of the narrative, avoiding religious doctrine and controversy. His sources are detailed in the Preface. Ex libris with the only markings stamped on edges under gilding. Lacks both free end papers. Almost all tissue guards present. Covers soiled. Moderate wear at edges and corners of covers. Mild age browning at edges. A few spots of foxing. Overall a very tight, Very Good copy.
Price: $165.00

6252
Anonymous.- The Nebraska Question Comprising Speeches in the United States Senate by Mr. Douglas, Mr. Chase, Mr. Smith, Mr. Everett, Mr. Wade, Mr. Badger, Mr. Seward, and Mr. Sumner. Together with the History of the Missouri Compromise. Daniel Webster's Memorial in regard to It - History of the Annexation of Texas - the Organization of Oregon Territory - and the Compromises of 1850. First Edition. Pages 119 pp.8vo. Printed paper wraps. Complete with ads. Double columnformat. First Edition. Sabin 52200. LCP 7004. The Missouri Compromise set some limitation on the extension of slavery. By 1854, however, there was pressure to repeal it. The proposal, then, for the organization of the Nebraska and Kansas territories reopened the deep divisions on this subject. The admission of Missouri, the annexation of Texas, the 1850 compromise and the Nebraska-Kansas Bills bore heavily on the controvereial issues of Indian treaties, the extension of slavery as well as the organization of Nebraska and Kansas. This volume reviews this history and records in detail the contemporary speeches in Congress on the issues. It reprints Daniel Webster's 1819 pamphlet on the Missouri Compromise, not included in his Collected Works. From here on was the course of the break-up of the American Union. Signed by owner, M. W. Tappan (twice on cover, once, each, on title page and on p.9). Modest foxing of preliminary pages. Edges of covers worn and chipped without loss of text. Else, Very Good. New York. J. S. Redfield. 1854.
Price: $125.00

10245
Cowell, Benjamin.- Spirit of '76 in Rhode island: or, Sketches of the Efforts of the Government and People in the War of the Revolution. Together with the Names of Those Who Belonged to the Rhode Island Regiments in the Army. With Biographical Notices, Reminiscences, &c., &c. First Edition. Pages 352 pp.8vo. Embossed brown publisher's cloth. Gilt titling on spine. First Edition. Bartlett, p. 81. Sabin 17235. Appleton/s Cycl. Am. Biog. (for Cowell). According to Cowell, Rhode Island, despite its penchant for independence in thought and behavior, provided more men , in proportion to population, and more money, in proportion to its wealth, to fight the American Revolution than any other colony. Here is a history of this effort by Rhode Island during the Revolutionary War. The lists of participants, including deserters, is accompanied by biographies (including women heroic in the conflict), and reminiscences ordinary citizens and some in the government and the militia. Cowell (1781-1860) was a distinguished jurist in Rhode Island. He was an1803 graduate of Brown University, a clerk of the Federal courts, and Chief Justice of the Court of Common pleas. He was noted for this work. Mild wear at ends of spine. Soiling and fading of the covers. Foxing of end papers and page edges. Pencil signatures of several members of the Smith family of Peacedalr, RI. Else ,Very Good. A tight copy, clean internally. Boston. A. J. Wright, Printer. 1850.
Price: $150.00

7929
[Curtis, George William] (pseud.: Paul Potiphar).- Illustrated by A. Hoppin. Engraved by J. W. Orr and N. Orr. The Potiphar Papers (Reprinted from "Putnam's Monthly."). First Edition. Sixth Thousand. Pages 251 pp.12mo. Publisher's Cloth. Publisher's device embossed on covers. Titled in gilt on spine. T.e.g. First Edition. Sixth Thousand. Cushing, p. 238,400. Haynes, p. 78. Stonehill. Bartlett, Bibliography of Rhode Island. Wright 2, 676. BAL 4267. Curtis (b. 1824) was an American journalist, after 1857 editor of "Harper's Weekly." He was born in Providence, RI, whence, at age 15, he moved to New York. At 18 he joined Brook Farm for 18 months with his elder brother, then taking up farming in Concord. in 1846 he left for a tour of Europe, before working on the New York "Tribune" until joining Harper's. Curtis is cited by Bartlett for an address in rhyme on the Sons of Rhode Island delivered at the New York Historical Society in 1863. Shaken. Cover faded and worn. Small marginal stains. Else, Good. New York. G. P. Putnam and Company 1854.
Price: $55.00

10292
Damrell & Moore, and, George Coolidge.- Boston Almanac for the Year 1856. No. XXI. First Edition. Pages 240 pp. + ads.16mo. Brown cloth, embossed in the blind. Gilt titling on front cover First Edition. Numerous illustrated ads, some printed in gilt on red paper.. Folding map of Boston in front. A wonderfully informative almanac for Boston for 1856. Contains latest US Census, lists of Federal and state officers, the usual occupations, societies, organizations, omnibus stops, libraries etc. Covers fading. Few wormholes in front hinge. Map and all else Very Good +. Boston. John P. Jewett & Co. 1856.
Price: $85.00

10246
Elizabeth, Charlotte.- The Wrongs of Woman. The Little Pin-Headers. First Edition. Pages 115 pp. + 8 pp. publisher's ads.12mo. One quarter black leather and marbled boards. Gilt titling on spine. First Edition. A spirited exhortation against child labor. Has a coterie of cruel overseers, pitiful and malnourished children, Irish orphans, money grubbing factory owners, etc. A church tract decrying the evil side of the industrial revolution. Wear at ends of spine and corners. Lacks front and rear free end papers. Foxing. Short closed tear at foot of pp. 35/36. Else, Very Good. New York. John S. Taylor & Co. 1844.
Price: $90.00

8279
Frieze, Jacob.- A Concise History, of the Efforts to Obtain an Extension of Suffrage in Rhode Island; from the Year 1811 to 1842. First Edition. Pages 171 pp.12mo. Brown Publisher's Cloth Embossed, with Gilt Titling on Front Cover. First Edition. Bartlett, p. 129. Heard & Hamsa, Bookman's Guide to Americana (9th Ed.),p. 160. Park, RI Biblio., #363.Gettleman, "The Dorr Rebellion." Sabin 25966. Jacob Frieze was an anti-Dorr pamphleteer, who had, in fact, voted for the People's Constitution in December, 1841, under the impression that it was an opinion without binding force. This volume is accepted as the standard Law & Order accountof the Dorr Rebellion. Foxed. Wear to Head and Tail and Edges of Spine and to Corners.Front Cover Stain.Else, Very Good. Providence. Benjamin F . Moore. 1842.
Price: $250.00

6773
Houghton, Eliza P. Donner.- The Expedition of the Donner Party and Its Tragic Fate. First Edition. Pages 375 pp.8vo. Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Lettering. T.e.g. First Edition. Portraits of author & her husband as frontispieces. Illustrated. Donald L. Hardesty, The Archaeology of the Donner Party, University of Nevada Press ( Review in AB, 11/3/97). An Insider's View of the Donner Party. Grafton Publishing Corporation Cancelled by Overlay Label of Arthur Clark Company. Illustrated. Author Was in the Donner Party as a Child under Her Father's Leadership. Ex Libris. Library Bookplate on Front Pastedown. Other slips and spine label as expected. Hinges cracking internally.Wear at ends of spine and corners.. Foredge untrimmed. Corner of pp. 343/4 torn with small loss of text. Else, Very Good. Glendale, CA. The Arthur H. Clark Co.(Grafton Publishing Co). 1920.
Price: $85.00

6798
Irving, Washington (pseudonym: Diedrich Knickerbocker).- A History of New York from the Beginning of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty. Containing among Many Surprises and Curious Matters, the Unutterable Ponderings of Walter the Doubter, the Disastrous Projects of William the Testy, and the Chivalric Achievements of Peter the Headstrong, The Three Dutch Governors of New Amsterdam. Being the Only Authentic History of the Times that Ever Hath Been or Ever Will Be Published. In Two Volumes. "A New Edition" Pages 276, 235 pp.12mo. Green publisher's cloth. Printed paper labels on spine. T.e.g. "A New Edition" Williams & Edge, p. 63 Originally published in 1809. Second printing of 1839 edition. Covers mildly abraded. Corners bumped. Spine labels chipped and soiled. Mild foxing. Lacks one of two front free flyleafs of Vol. II. Else, Good +. Philadelphia. Lea and Blanchard. 1840.
Price: $145.00

6800
Jackson, Andrew.- Annual Messages, Veto Messages, Protest &c. of Andrew Jackson, President of the United States. Second Edition. Pages 272 pp. + 3 pp. publisher's ads at rear.8vo. Purple pebbled publisher's cloth. Printed paper label on spine. Second Edition. Not in Howes, AmImp, Sabin, Wise & Cronin or NUC. An unrecorded compilation of the Presidential writings of Andrew Jackson, from his Inaugural Address (for both terms), through his Messages to Congress (Annual and otherwise) and including his Veto messages during the contentious issues of his administration. The veto messsage on the Bank Bill is included. His message of Protest to the Senate for his having been censured by them for arrogation of powers is also here. A very revealing volume on the difficult issues faced by the President in the early 19th century. Mild foxing, chiefly of preliminary pages. Spine label chipped and soiled. Wear and cracking of hinges. Corners bumped. faint water stain at lower margin of late pages. Else, Very Good, with tight, clean text. Baltimore. Edward J. Coale & Co.. 1835.
Price: $275.00

6901
Lossing, Benson J.- The Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution; or, Illustrations by Pen and Pencil, of the History, Biography, Scenery, Relics, and Traditions of the War for Independence. With Eleven Hundred Engravings on Wood, by Lossing and Barritt. Chiefly from Original Sketches by the Author. ?Second Edition. Pages 783, 772 pp.4to Original brown publisher's cloth, pebbled grain, with covers ruled in the blind and embossed front and back with US shield, eagle and motto., the rear cover in the blind, the front cover in gilt. Titled in gilt with illustration, also in gilt on spine. Elaborate decoration. T.e.g. ?Second Edition. Printed and engraved titles, the latter drawn by S. Wailin, engraved by Lossing and Barritt. Engravings in text, as noted. Engraved frontispiece of the signers in Volume 2. Howes L-477. Sabin 42129. Groce & Wallace (for Wallin). Lossing's famous illustrated history of the American Revolution. A lovely set, probably a later issue. Sabin values the books for their information, not to be found elsewhere, making this work "a cyclopedia of the American Revolution." 9Lossing was an author, editor and engraver, prolific in his output. Samuel Wallin was an engraver and draftsman active in New York , 1838-51. He exhibited at the National Academy. Gilt very bright. Minimal wear along edges and corners. Lacks frontispiece in Volume 1. Front hinge starting internally. Owner's bookplate on front pastedown of both volumes. Else, Very Good. New York. Harper Brothers. 1850-1855
Price: $295.00

10299
Mitchell, S[amuel] Augustus.- An Accompaniment to Mitchell's Reference and Distance Map of the United States; Containing an Index of the Various Counties, Districts, Parishes, Townships, Towns, &c. together with an Index of the Rivers; by Which Any County, District, Township, &c., or River, May Be Found on the Map, without Difficulty; Also. an Accurate Synopsis of the Population of the Union, according to the Census of 1840, Alphabetically Arranged; besides Statements of the Aggregate Amount of the Different Classes of the Inhabitants and Their Pusuits, the Value of the Produce of the Mines, Agriculture, Manufactures and Commerce, Lists of the Universities and Colleges, Canals, Railroads, &c. Third Edition (First Edition Based on 1840 Census). Pages 208 pp.Tall 12mo. Half black calf, ruled and titled in gilt on the spine. Marble covered boards. Third Edition (First Edition Based on 1840 Census). Howes reports 5 editions between 1835 and 1845 Howes M684. Sabin 49715. A series of helpful tables and charts, based on the decennial census of 1840. The volume, first published in 1834, was an accessory to Mitchell's map of America. This issue missed by Sabin. Wear at ends of spine, corners and edges. Mild foxing. Else, Very Good. Philadelphia. S. Augustus Mitchell. 1844.
Price: $195.00

10300
[Mrs. Prism].- The Ladies Indispensable Companion and Housekeepers' Guide: Embracing Rules of Etiquette; Rules for the Formation of Good Habits; and a Great Variety of Medical Recipes. To Which Is Added One of the Best Systems of Cookery Ever Published. The Majority of the Recipes Are New and Ought to Be Possessed by Every One. Third Edition . Pages 136 pp.8vo. Brown publisher's cloth embossed in the blind and with gilt titling and decoration on front cover. Third Edition . Lowenthal 788, 789, 819. A wonderful example of a typical ladies' vade mecum for the mid-19th Century. the first section is the guide to a "Family Physician", who has advice for the raising of children, including the use of leeches for treatment of dropsy of the head, Lugol's solution (iodine) for rickets and scrofula, digitalis and opium for measles; the second section is a guide to domestic economy with a large selection of trusty recipes, cookery for the sick, advice about the ladies' workbox, household projects and etiquette for ladies and gentlemen ("a gentleman may hook a dress...with perfect propriety, and should be able to do so gracefully"), advice about the keeping of canary birds; etc. Covers worn at corners, edges and spine. Lacks 40% of spine. Covers soiled. Rear hinge starting at head. Foxing. Toning of pages. Else, Good +. New-York. H. Dayton. 1860.
Price: $250.00

10192
O'Connell, Daniel, and Chase, S[almon] P[ortland].- [Pamphlet}. Liberty or Slavery? Letter of Daniel O'Connell on American Slavery. Letter of Hon. S. P. Chase in Reply to Daniel O'Connell. First Edition in Pages 15 pp.8vo. Yellow printed paper wraps. Portrait of Chase in a wreathed border appliqued to front cover. First Edition in LCP/HSP Afro-Americana #7263. In 1843, the great Irish patriot and leader, Daniel O'Connell, addressed a letter "to a Committee of the Cincinnati Irish Repeal Association, who had rebuked him for his Anti-Slavery opinions....This bold....protest of the great Irish Orator against the cruel injustice of American Slavery" remained unanswered by the Cincinnati group. However, Salmon P. Chase, later Secretary of the Treasury to Lincoln, was entrusted by a group of Irish Americans in Cincinnati to provide a reply, addressed to the Loyal National Repeal Association. Chase reviewed the history of slavery in America and calls for its abolition in ringing terms. He also calls for a repeal of the subjugation of the Irish by the British government. These two Irish and Irish-American appeals for the abolition of slavery were published by the Cincinnati Catholic Telegraph in 1863, 20 years after their original writing. Chase fell out with Lincoln and later had Presidential aspirations. But he was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by Lincoln and served through Reconstruction and the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. Signature on front cover by I. / [?J.] A. Graham and (?) by S.P. Chase. Inscribed on p.1, possibly by Chase,: "1864, July 22. Gift of C. Sumner. (Class of 1830)." Sumner, a brilliant lawyer, a graduate of Harvard College (1830), and later famously a Senator from Massachusetts and the great orator of the anti-slavery movement, apparently owned this copy Chips from edges of covers without encroaching on text or image. Removed. Else, Very Good. Cincinnati, OH. (The Catholic Telegraph ) Chronicle Print. 1863.
Price: $185.00

10282
[Pitman, John].- [Pamphlet]. To the Members of the General Assembly of Rhode-Island. First Edition. Pages 24 pp.8vo. Self wraps. Stab sewn. First Edition. Bartlett, pp. 83, 102, 205. M. E. Gettleman, The Dorr Rebellion, A Study in American Radic alism, 1833-1849, Random House, 1973.(especially pp. 57-58 and 73-74. Mowry, Dorr War, p. 28. NUC and Sabin attribute this anonymous pamphlet to Pitman. Not in American Imprints. Sabin 63054. One of the critical pamphlets relating to the Dorr Rebellion in Rhode Island, a central issue of which was the limitation of the Suffrage to property owners in a changing society at the spearhead of the Industrial Revolution. Pitman was a prominent Federal District Judge, whose correspondence with Justice Story and addresses to the people of Rhode Island as well as this one to the General Assembly, laid out some of the issues of the Dorr Rebellion and the conservative point of view. Originally a supporter of the extension of suffrage, Pitman changed his mind after the People's Convention of 1841 and the election of a new government, which he felt lacked authority. In opposing free suffrage, Pitman appeals to the Founding Fathers, especially Washington, to States' Rights (especially for Rhode Island, which still operated upon its old pre-Revolution charter without ever having written a new constitution), and to xenophobia, lest a Federal immigration policy overwhelm the State. He attacks Orestes Brownson (mistaking his name in the process), a Massachusetts reformer, who, although hardly involved in the Rhode Island problem, was a convenient target for Pitman's wrath. Browning of pages. Water stains. Chip from tail of leaf 1/2, without encroaching on text. Last leaf detached. Good. N.P. [Providence]. N.Pub.[Knowles & Vose]. N.D. [1842]
Price: $350.00

10276
[Sheet Music]. Russell, Henry (Music) and Mackay, Chas. (Words).- Long Parted Have We Been. First Edition. Pages 6 pp.Fo. Disbound. First Edition. Illustrated.Musical Bouquet Nos. 371 & 372. Ewen, Pop.Am.Comp., pp.148-50. Appleton's Cycl. Am. Biog. Concise DNB. Krummel & Sadie, p.212. Dichter Handbook, #1810. Composed and sung by Henry Russell in "The Emigrant's Progress".Front cover illustrations (woodblock engravings) entitled "Mr. Henry Russell's Panorama of America". The central image is of the composer seated at the piano, with a large sailing ship evident through the window. The surrounding images portray an American ship; a British ship; a bucolic domestic landscape with a father returning from a row, being greeted by wife and child, before a cabin in the woods, amidst mountains and lakes ; a view of Niagara Falls; a scene of white dudes in a tavern, one having his boots removed by a Black (?slave), with another Black standing by with his slippers; a view of a slave auction. A facsimile of Russell's signature on the front cover. Henry Russell (1812-1900) was born in England of Jewish parentage. He studied with Bellini and knew Rossini, Donizetti and Meyerbeer. To seek his fortune he moved to America from 1833 to 1841, where his income came from his concerts (piano and voice recitals), not from his immensely popular sheet music, for which he received no royalties. Among his famous works are "Woodman, Spare That Tree," "The Indian Hunter," "That Old Gang of Mine," etc. He championed social causes like abolition (as in this item), reform of mental asylums and temperance. he was closely associated with "The Musical Bouquet. This song expresses the loneliness of an emigré and his enthusiasm for an imminent visit by a countryman. Dr. Charles Mackay (1814-1889) often wrote the poems for Russell's music. As a subeditor for "The Morning Chronicle", 1834-44, he must have known Charles Dickens. Pages separated. A few small closed tears at edges.. Mildly soiled. Else, Very Good. London. Musical Bouquet Office. N.D. [ca. 1840-50]
Price: $225.00

7157
Spear, Charles.- Essays on the Punishment of Death (Capital Punishment). Seventh Edition(So Stated; Same Year as First Publication). Pages 237 pp. + 14 pp. Ads, etc.6to. Brown Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Title. Seventh Edition(So Stated; Same Year as First Publication). Stipple engraving frontispiece by W. Thorp, engraved by Bouvé and Sharp. Sabin 89066. An important 19th Century view of capital punishment. Known to be in the library of Thomas Wilson Dorr while he was imprisoned for leading the armed "Dorr Rebellion" in Rhode Island in favor of popular voting rights not tied to property ownership. Includes among Appendices a compendium of capital çrimes in the United States and the several ßtates. ßtated Seventh Edition. Was there, in this case, inflation of the number of Editions declared , a common 19th Century publishing practice used to foster the notion of a Best Seller? Spear (1803- 1863) wrote critically of capital punishment, which he thought was a vengeful usurpation of divine power. In 1845 he was appointed General Secretary of the Massachusetts Society for the Abolition of Capital Punishment. Minimal wear at ends of spine. Foxing of frontispiece, chiefly in margin. Else, Very Good. Boston. Charles Spear. 1844.
Price: $165.00

10264
Swift, H.- [Sheet Music] Uncle Tom. Song and Chorus. Subject from Uncle Tom's Cabin. Dedicated to W. H. J. First Edition. Pages 5 pp.Fo. Decorated printed paper wraps engraved by Gresne. Disbound. First Edition. Plate 2026. A lament of the slaves at the selling and removal of Uncle Tom. The chastising of the Massa for sending Tom away in the face of the loyalty of his entire retinue of slaves. Soiling of Covers. Title page reinforced at hinge. Chips from foot at hinge. Browning of page edges. Two small closed tears at leading edge of pp.3/4. Else, Very Good. New York. W. Hill. 1852.
Price: $125.00

10256
[Temperance Broadside].- Certificate of Membership in Connecticut Cold Water Army. Pages 1p.7 1/2" x 9 3/4". Framed in gilt wood frame with ribbon carving on all sides. Illustrated with a woodcut, unsigned. A temperance broadside certifying that H. Russell Cosby had taken the Cold Water Pledge, which is printed on the certificate. Cosby's name is neatly inscribed on the certificate in blue ink, while the signatures of Th. S. Williams, President of the Connecticut Temperance Society, Chas. J. Warren, the Secretary and the countersignature of Saml. Mallett, Leader of the Bridgeport Division, are printed on the form, which bears the printed date of July 4th, 1842. The Cold Water Army Pledge, composed of short verses, each line of which is a biblical quotation (with references provided below in print). The image shows a parade of children past a drunkard and skeleton and bearing signs proclaiming "No Alcohol" and "Cold Water Army." The leader offers the drunkard a pen and a scroll calling for "Total Abstinence" for his signature. At top is an eagle bearing ribbons in his mouth inscribed with the praises of water and a shield with a Latin motto. All are surrounded by an elaborate decorative printed border. A grand production. The forerunner of The Connecticut Temperance Society, the first in America, was established in 1789, largely stimulated by Dr. Benjamin Rush's diatribe against alcohol excess 5 years earlier. Yale has a copy in its Temperance Collection (Box 1, Folder 3). Very Good +. New Haven.87878 Hitchcock & Stafford, Printers. 1842.
Price: $550.00

10267
Wayland, Francis A Discourse Delivered at the Opening of The Providence Athenaeum. July 11, 1838. Published at the Request of the Directors of the Athenaeum. First Edition Pages 37 pp.8vo. Self wraps. trace of blue paper wraps(?). Sewn. First Edition Rev. Francis Wayland, President of Brown University, delivered this stirring address at the opening of one of our nation's oldest libraies, The Providence Athenaeum. It was a subscription library and had 300 subscribers. Wayland spoke of the development, through such institutions, of the intellectual, moral, scientific and economic capacity of a society. He thought that the religious aspects of humankind were well taken care of by other social institutions and was not the concern of the library. The library had the capacity, if used properly, to expand the attainments of all individuals, enhancing their knowledge and power. He urged the directors to expand the openness of their institution to thousands, so that Providence could be a beacon to the entire society of America. Minimal foxing of cover. Minimal browning of edges. Else, Very Good. Providence. Knowles, Vose & Company. 1838.
Price: $101.00

10281
Work, Henry Clay.- [Sheet Music}. Ring the Bell, Watchman. Song and Chorus. First Edition. Pages 2 pp.Fo. Illustrated and decorated printed paper wraps. Disbound. First Edition. Plate 421-2. Fuld, World Famous Music, p.349. A pre-fire Chicago musical imprint by Root & Cady. The words and music are by the illustrious composer of "Marching through Georgia" and other war songs and of temperance songs, Henry C. Work, possibly in celebration of full Black emancipation and the end of the Civil War. According to Fuld, "Marching through Georgia" was the most hated song in the South. Work (1832-84) was trained as a printer. Born in Connecticut, he moved to Illinois at age 3, as his father, an ardent abolitionist, was working for the Underground Railway. Henry C. Work, still a printer and later an inventor of toys and machines, offered a song to George Root, who encouraged him to write music full-time and published many of his songs. On rear cover is a gloriously illustrated publisher's ad. Not in American Imprints Inventory No. 4, Checklist of Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints, 1851-1871. Repaired transverse tear across pp. 1/2 not encroaching on text.Dampstain along leading edges. Hinge separated. Else, Good Chicago. Root & Cady. 1865.
Price: $140.00

10131
Seward, Theodore F., and White, Geo. L. (Compilers).- Jubilee Songs (Enlarged) As Sung by the Jubilee Singers. Part I. Originally copyright 1872. Enlarged in this edition by 16 pages with a second part also added (not in this pamphlet), the two parts also issued in one volume between boards. These constitute the songs of the popular Jubilee Band of Singers, identified with Fisk University and representing a high culture interpretation of popular Black American songs of the 19th Century. Of the nine original Jubilee Singers, from whom these songs were taken down, seven had been born in slavery. Second (Enlarged) Edition. Mild soiling of covers. Small chip from spine. Else, Very Good. New York. Biglow & Main. 1884.
Price: $48.00

10105
Valentine, D[avid] T[homas].- Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York. 1866. One of the famous New York City manuals prepared by Vaslentine, Clerk of the Common Council of the City of New York. These were published by Valentine between 1841 and 1868. He was paid $3500 per year for his effort. This copy given with the compliments of City Councilman (Seventh District) Christopher Pullman and signed by him on front free end paper. Late in the volume, in the chapter on the Great Fires of 1776 and 1778, is a second folding map on India paper, in facsimile of the map of 1778 which showed the area of New York City enclosed by the palisades (in 1745) and consumed by the fires. The map had originally been presented to the New York Historical Society by David Grim[m?]. The volumes contain detailed statistics about and history of the City. There are numerous illustrations of buildings and city scenes. Most desirable are the chromolithographs, which, like the text, are pristine in this volume. Bennet calls it "the most important of all illustrated annuals." First Edition. Sabin 54369. Bennett, US Color PLate Bks., p. 107. Small tear at one fold and closed tear in one segment of frontis map. Front hinge cracking. Few stains on cover. Folding map of the fires torn into two segments along folds with small closed tears on folds elsewhere on map. All present. Else, Very Good. New York. D. T. Valentine. Edmund Jones & Co. Printers. 1866.
Price: $500.00

10129
Trienens, Roger J.- Pioneer Imprints from Fifty States. A catalogue of imprints with illustrations os an examle for each of fifty States. First Edition. Spine faded. Else, Very Good. Washington, DC Library of Congress. 1973. 50.00 10127 Lytton, Edward Bulwer.- The Last Days of Pompeii. In Two Volumes. With Illustrations. Bulwer Lytton's famous historical novel about Pompeii just prior to its burial. ? First Edition. (Preface dated 1891). Minimal foxing of preliminaries. Mild darkening of spine. Wear at edges of spine. Else, Very Good. Boston. Estes and Lauriat. N.D. [1891]
Price: $60.00

10132
Seward, Theodore F., and White, Geo. L. (Compilers).- Jubilee Songs (Enlarged) As Sung by the Jubilee Singers. Part I. Originally copyright 1872. Enlarged in this edition by 16 pages with a second part also added (not in this pamphlet), the two parts also issued in one volume between boards. These constitute the songs of the popular Jubilee Band of Singers, identified with Fisk University and representing a high culture interpretation of popular Black American songs of the 19th Century. Of the nine original Jubilee Singers, from whom these songs were taken down, seven had been born in slavery. Second (Enlarged) Edition. Mild soiling of covers. Small chip from spine. Front hinge cracking on fold. Else, Very Good. New York. Biglow & Main. 1884.
Price: $48.00

10163
[Sheet Music]. Bishop, T. Brigham.- Sounds from the Old Stone Mill. Respectfully Dedicated to the Citizens of Newport and Visitors of the Old Stone Mill. Ella Fay, Song & Chorus. Beautiful image of the Stone Tower of Newport, RI, from 1857. The image shows a number of people dressed fashionably for the period on the surrounding lawn. In the background is what may be an image of the Redwood Library. The cover bears a facsimile of the composer/author's signature. As sheet music, the item is defective, in lacking one sheet, pp. 3/4. The image, however is outstanding, with one of the finest views of the famed Newport stone tower, a construction whose origin has been obscure. Some have proposed early Norse origins, but most likely it is early colonial or late pre-colonial in dating. Studies of this question are on-going. Lacks pp. 3/4. Water Stain on lower part of cover Else Very Good -.. Boston. Oliver Ditson & Co. 1857.
Price: $195.00

10170
[Anonymous].- Correspondence between Gen. Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, President James Monroe, John Quincy Adams concerning the Conduct of the Seminole Campaign. In Niles' Weekly Register. Fourth Series. No.1- Vol. IV. Vol.XL, Whole No. 1015, pp. March 5, 1831. The text of an extensive correspondence, chiefly between Andrew Jackson and John C. Calhoun, President and Vice President, pertaining to Calhoun's alleged earlier criticism of Jackson's conduct of the Seminole Campaign in Florida in Cabinet Meetings. It consists of numerous accusations of misbehavior on each side with attempts in the controversy to engage President Monroe, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford and others. The allegation against Jackson was that he had exceeded his authority in taking Pensacola., a Spanish post. Calhoun ends this correspondence on a very hostile note, essentially calling Crawford a liar in a letter to him. Crawford, a recent Presidential candidate, had proposed that Jackson be disciplined for the invasion of Florida and later tried to make it appear that Calhoun was responsible for the criticism of Jackson. Other articles include a note on the still unsettled boundary between the United States and Canada, procedings of the Senate and House, an argument between Poland and Russia, notes on the formation of the country of Belgium, etc. A rich issue First Edition. Very Good. Baltimore, MD. H. Niles. 1831.
Price: $75.00

10182
[Anonymous].- Insurrection of the Blacks. In Niles' Weekly Register. Fourth Series. No. 26 - Vol. IV. Aug. 27, 1831. Vol.XL, Whole No. 1,040, pp. 452-3 A reportof a major insurrection by Black slaves in Southhampton County, Virginia on or about August 21-23, 1831. The slaves, apparently hiding in the nearby swamps and numbering by various estimates from one to several hundred, possibly under white leadership, rose as an insurgency and attacked a number of white families, killing up to 70 persons. A militia of 300 persons was retreating. The author believes plunder to be the motive, since "there is little disaffection in the slaves generally." A.llso noted in this issue are: various notes on the cheating of the Cherokees of their annuity and further actions of Georgia to limit help to the Cherokees by the missionaries; moves by South Carolina toward nullification of Federal statutes; and early moves toward nomination of John C. Calhoun for the Presidency. First Edition. Last leaf possibly missing. Else, Very Good. Baltimore, MD. H. Niles. 1831.
Price: $75.00

9991
[Broadside].- J. H. Bump's Atmospheric Attempering Churn. The Subscriber Calls Attention of Dairymen and All Other Persons Interested in the Art of Butter Making, to This Improved Atmospheric Churn. Patented by J. H. Bump, of Morris, Oswego County, New-York, the 26th of October 1858 ..... Morris, NY. A. S. Avery, Job Printer. 1859. 1 p. 17 1/2" x 24 1/8" Single Sheet. First Edition. A dramatic broadside announcing a new churn, important for the dairy industry of upstate New York in mid-19th century. Many type styles. It quotes "Scientific American" to describe the new churn's method of aerating milk and cream in the butter-making process. The text touts the cheapness of its manufacture, the efficiency of operation and its efficacy in increased yields of highest quality butter as boons to farmers and dairies. The claims are supported by a series of quoted testimonials from January, 1859, promptly after its patenting. A most attractive broadside. Few scant spots of foxing at margins. Else, Near Fine. Morris, NY. A. S. Avery, Job Printer. 1859.
Price: $350.00

9986
Buell, P. L. & N. Sizer, Phrenologists.- A Guide to Phrenology, Designed to Illustrate the Science of the Human Mind as Manifested through the Brain, Embracing the Fundamental Principles of Phrenology; Its Utility to Parents and Teachers in Developing and Educating the Mental Faculties of the Rising Generation, and of Self Improvement, together with the Adaptation of Each of the Organs and a Phrenological Chart, in Seven Degrees of Development with Numerous Combinations, Illustrated by Engravings. Woodstock, VT. Haskell and Palmer (Mercury Press). 1842. 184 pp. 12mo. Purple finely pebbled publisher's cloth, with printed paper label, titled in black, on front cover. First Edition. A grand copy of an early text on Phrenology, an interesting 1842 imprint from Woodstock, VT. Illustrated appropriately with wood cuts and engravings. There is detailed analysis of phrenological characteristics, with references to Spurzheim, Gall, Combe, Fowler et al. The owners were Henry S. and Nancy B. Sandford and Elizabeth Shelton. Their phrenologica l character assessments were conducted by one of the authors, Nelson Sizer, on Dec. 8th 1843 as noted in ink on p. 179. The is a marginal set of scores in ink through the text, coded for each subject, as detailed on the rear free end paper. Summary scores for each subject and each characteristic are recorded in pencil on the rear flyleaf. Minimally foxed.Slightwear at ends of spine. Else, Very good +. Woodstock, VT. Haskell and Palmer (Mercury Press). 1842.
Price: $275.00

9978
Carey, M[athew].- Letters on the Colonization Society; with a View of Its Probable Results, under the Following Heads: The Origin of the Society; Increase of the Coloured Population; Manumission of Slaves in This Country; Declarations of Legislatures, and Othef Assembled Bodies, in Favor of The Society;...........Addressed to the Hon. Charles F. Mercer, M.H.R.U.S. Philadelphia. Young, Printer. 1832. 32 pp. Illustrated. 8vo. Self wraps. Third Edition, Enlarged and Improved. A series of 10 letters on slavery to Charles Mercer, a U.S. Congressman. Some copies have a yellow printed wrapper. As frontispiece, there is a cross-section of a slave ship, showing how to maximize the human cargo by close-packing of the slaves in the hold of the vessel.. There are also two maps preceding the text, one of the Colony of Liberia in West Africa (attributed to Ashmun) and a second of the town of Monrovia. The text emphasizes the evils of slavery to both blacks and whites aand the advantages of recolonization. There are endorsements (qualified) by James Madison and John Marshall. Mild foxing. Else, Very Good. Sabin 10870. Dumond 35. Philadelphia. Young, Printer. 1832.
Price: $500.00

10041
Cornelius, Mrs. [Mary Hooker].- The Young Housekeeper's Friend; or, A Guide to Domestic Edonomy and Comfort. Boston. Charles Tappan. 1846. 190 pp. 12mo. Original green printed paper covered boards. Brown cloth spine. First Edition. Thre scarce first edition of one of America's early books on domestic science. Although ragged in external shape, it can easily be restored. Owner's signatures in pencil on front free fly leaf, earliest dated August, 1847 Rear cover detached. Shaken. Foxed. Cloth spine heavily worn, cracked and chipped. Lacks rear blank end paper. Else Good. Lowenstein 399. Brown, Cul. Amer., 1491,1498,1500,1505 (all later editions than this one). Am. Imp. 46-1830 Boston. Charles Tappan. 1846.
Price: $325.00

9661
Dwight, Edwin Welles].- Memoirs of Henry Obookiah, a Native of Owhyhee, and a Member of the Foreign Mission School; Who Died at Cornwall, Conn. Feb. 17, 1818, Aged 26 Years. Bound with Four Items: (1) A Sermon Delivered at the Funeral of Henry Obookiah, a Native of Owhyhee, and a Member of the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, February 18, 1818. By Lyman Beecher, A.M. (2) The Banner of Christ Set Up. A Sermon Delivered at the Inauguration of the Rev. Hermon (sic) Daggett, as Principal of the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, May 6, 1818. By Joseph Harvey, A.M. (3) An Inauguration Address, Delivered at the Opening of the Foreign Mission School./ May 6, 1818. By Herman Daggett, A.M. (4) The Inaugural Address [to Herman Daggett of the Foreign Mission School] by the Hon. John Treadwell, Esq. New-Haven. Nathan Whiting, Agent of the Foreign Mission School. S. Converse, Printer. 1819. 129, 40, 32, 8, 6 pp. No frontispiece portrait in this issue. 12mo. Full brown contemporary calf. Gilt rules on spine. First Edition. Obookiah was born in Hawaii and came to the U.S. in 1809. "After witnessing the massacre of his family, Obookiah.decided to leave Hawaii. . . An American ship [the Triumph under Captain Brintnall ] touched at the islands, and Obookiah sailed by way of China to New York. Through Obookiah, interest was awakened in the Hawaiians, which led to the American mission in Hawaii in 1820." — Hill p. 91-92. (Quoted by Ten Pound Island) . In the US, he attended the Foreigh Mission School. He had translated the Book of Genesis into Hawaiian, but he died of typhoid fever before he could go back to Hawaii as a missionary.. "This book did more than any other work to interest the general public of New England in supporting a mission to the Hawaiian Islands proposed by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. It narrates the life of Henry Obookiah (or Opukakaia), born in Hawwaii about the year 1792. As a youth he sailed to America, arriving there in 1809, and for a period made his home with Captain Brintnall in New Haven, Connecticut. At Yale College, his desire for knowledge was recognized, and he began instruction by private tutors, earning his support as a farm hand. -- Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography, 478. There are .... additional titles bound with the main text, which, although separately paginated, are contiguous in registration, and are an integral part of the work. Forbes, Treasures, 58. First Edition." (Quoted by Lefkowicz) Covers bruised. Pages browned. Lacks front free end paper. Gilt ruling faded.Else, Very Good. Hill, pp. 91-2. Sabin,56429 (Obookiah) and 4342 (Beecher); the last three sermons not recorded. Not in Howes. New-Haven. Nathan Whiting, Agent of the Foreign Mission School. S. Converse, Printer. 1819.
Price: $325.00

7299
"Eminent Writers."- Current and Important Events Embracing a Chronological History of the Russo-Turkish War and Great Eastern Conflict. Also, History of the Temperance Movement, and the Irresistible Conflict with the Demon Alcohol. Opium, Its Intemperate Use and Cure. Life and Death of Pope Pius IX., with a Description of the Conclave of Cardinals and the Election of Pope Leo XIII., and Other Important Matter. St. Louis, MO. James H. Chambers. 1878. 304 pp. + 4 pp. publisher's ads. Illustrated. 8vo. Blue publisher's cloth embossed in the blind and in gilt. Gilt titling and decorations on front cover and on spine. First Edition. Jingoist temperance Introduction. Articles on the Russo-Turkish War, Temperance Movement, Opium, Pope Pius IX, Pope Leo XIII, “The Jewish Creed”, etc. Wood engraving portraits of the several authors, all, apparently, from St Louis. The engraving process includes photoengraving, according to at least one of the illustrations. The commentaries on Catholicism and Judaism all point to the unification of all religions with the coming of the Messiah. An interesting mélange of populist contemporary thought. Mild wear at ends of spine and corners. Mild soiling of covers. Else, Very Good. St. Louis, MO. James H. Chambers. 1878.
Price: $95.00

7943
Fowler, L. N.- The Illustrated Phrenological Almanac. 1859. Providence, RI. Geo. H. Whitney. 1859. 26 pp. + monthly calendar + publisher's ads. 12mo. Printed Paper Self-Wrapper. First Edition. In addition to the almanac, there are narrative histories of phrenology, with notes on Gall, Spurzheim and Combe, a review of phrenology and physiology of the sexes, and illustrated discussion of the specific phrenology of James R. Lowell,Eugene Sue, Frank Leslie, Henry W. Longfelloiw, Alfred Tennyson, et al. Many Ads, especially on subjects dealing with phrenology, mesmerism, and the water cure. Very Good. Providence, RI. Geo. H. Whitney. 1859.
Price: $125.00

10048
Lawrence, William R.- Extracts from the Diary and Correspondence of the Late Amos Lawrence; with a Brief Account of Some Incidents in His Life. Edited by His Son, William R. Lawrence, M.D. Boston. Gould and Lincoln. 1855. 369 pp. Illustrated. Engraved portraits, scenes, etc. 8vo. Brown embossed publisher's cloth with gilt titling on spine. T.e.g. Yellow end papers. First Edition. The life and good works of the early American merchant and industrialist, Amos Lawrence. These are revealed in his letters and diaries, as annotated by his son. He was the brother of Abbott Lawrence, his business partner, and William Lawrence. They helped start the American textile industry in the town subsequently named after them. Besides their own achievements and great benefactions (for they were, indeed generous philanthropists), they sired an important New England Family of the 19th and 20th centuries. Wear at ends of spine and corners.Small losses at head of spine. Both hinges starting. Foxing and browning of preliminaries. Illustrations with tissue guards. Leaves 119/120 and 121/122 torn with loss of a few letters of text (one piece separated, but present). Else, Very Good. Boston. Gould and Lincoln. 1855.
Price: $110.00

10002
[Mattison, Hiram] (pseudonym: A Searcher after Truth).- The Rappers: or, The Mysteries, Fallacies, and Absurdities of Spirit-Rapping, Table-Tipping, and Entrancement. New York. H. Long & Brother. 1854. 282 pp. + 6 pp. publisher's ads. 12 mo. Illustrated red publisher's cloth. Embossed illustration ingilt on front cover, in the blind on rear cover. First Edition. Illustrated with 2 frontispiece wood engravings drawn by Thwaites and engraved by E. Hooper. An interesting debunking of rapping and kindred arcane spirits from direct contemporary experience. Hiram Mattison (1811–1868) was a prolific Methodist Episcopalian minister, anti-slavery, anti-Catholic, Trinitarian, Sabbatarian, who wrote widely on these subjects, as well as on spirit-rapping and astronomy (he produced an edition of Elijah Burritt's astronomical atlas and wrote astronomy texts, as well. William Thwaites was an engraver and landscape painter, active in New York in mid-century. Edward Hooper (1829–70), born in London, a wood engraver and watercolorist, came to America just before this publication and worked in New York City and Brooklyn, often with Albert Bobbett. He was a founder of the American Watercolor Society. The author is not listed in Cushing, Haynes or Stonehill. Front cover stained. Spine soiled. Minimal foxing of front free end paper, only. Gilt cover illustration of table-tipping very bright. Wear to ends of spine and to corners. Browning of yellow end papers. Owner's signature in pencil on front free end paper and on margin of frontispiece, dated 1862. Else, Very Good. Hamilton 1242a. For Thwaites: Groce & Wallace. p. 630; Hamilton, 213–4. For Hooper: Groce & Wallace, p.325; Fielding, p. 174. Hamilton. NUC: NM #0344405 New York. H. Long & Brother. 1854.
Price: $275.00

7064
Randolph , Thomas Jefferson (Editor). - Memoir, Correspondence, and Miscellanies, from the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. 4 Vols. Boston. Gray and Bowen. 1830. Portrait Frontispiece. 8vo. Second Edition. Ex Libris. Rebound in Cloth. First Published 1829. Very Good. Howes (III) R58. Boston. Gray and Bowen. 1830.
Price: $1,000.00

9968
Webster, Daniel.- [Pamphlet]. The Rhode island Question. Mr. Webster's Argument in the Supreme Court of the United States in the Case of Martin Luther vs. Luther M. Borden and others, January 27th, 1848. Washington, DC. J. and G. S. Gideon. 1848. 20 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wraps. Sewn. First Edition. In 1841–42, there was in Rhode Island considerable agitation for extension of suffrage beyond property holders. Thomas Dorr headed the movement which, without sanction of the authorities, held elections and developed a new constitution. A rebellion ensued and Dorr was arrested and imprisoned for treason. The State of Rhode Island was sued in defense of Dorr and others. Daniel Webster, representing the State, reviewed the arguments for and against the rebels and concludes that the State did have the authority to arrest and imprison them. He finds his authority in the Constitution of the United States, leaving such decisions to the States without review by the Supreme Court. The Court agreed in an important decision and let it stand. Of interest, according to McLoughlin ("RI, A History", p 127), the national reaction to this decision contributed to the force of the rejection of Southern secession at the start of the Civil War. Small chips from eges of paper cover. Slight soiling of covers. Else, Very Good. Bartlett, Biblio. RI, pp. 270–1. Mowry, "The Dorr War," pp.232–56. Washington, DC. J. and G. S. Gideon. 1848.
Price: $195.00

10006
Young, Alexander.- The Varieties of Human Greatness. A Discourse on the Life and Character of the Hon. Nathaniel Bowditch, LL.D., F.R.S., Delivered in the Church on Church Green, March 25, 1838. Boston. Charles C. Little and James Btrown. 1838. 119 pp. 8vo. Light brown printed paper wraps. First Edition. Wood engraving by N. B. Devereux. A discourse on the life and character of Nathaniel Bowditch, the mathematician noted for authorship of "The New American Practical Navigator" in 1804. Bowditch achieved great fame and social status, becoming President of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Trustee of the Boston Athenaeum and a member of the Board of Fellows of Harvard University. In this latter capacity, Bowditch, known for his impetuousnes and quick temper, was accused by the Rev John Gorham Palfrey (in an 1840 pamphlet), as being responsible for a stroke suffered by President Kirkland of Harvard, his later incapacity and resignation. A stirring defense of Bowditch was made by his children, all noted citizens, scholars or physicians. Alexander Young (1800–1854) was a Unitarian minister and an antiquary . A gifted story teller, he served as an Overseer at Harvard; published “Old English Prose Writers, ” historical works on the Plymouth and Mass. Bay Colonies. and other works. A bibliophile, he, with Charles Deane met daily with "Jared Sparks, Charles Sumner, Edward A. Crowninshield, James Savage, George Ticknor and sometimes Longfellow" (DNB) at the Old Corner Book Store for literary discussion. Appended to this essay is a bibliography of some of Bowditch's scientific papers and an anonymous poem signed “T” entitled “Elegy on the death of Doctor Bowditch” which had appeared in the Boston Daily Advertiser of March 22 , 1838. Nicholson B. Devereux (1813–?) was a wood engraver who worked in Boston and Philadelphia in association with his brother, George T. Devereux. Among others, he sometimes engraved for F. O. C. Darley (Hamilton) Lacks rear cover. Front cover chipped at margins and mildly soiled. Mild foxing. Else, Very Good. DNB (for Young and Bowditch). Groce & Wallace, p. 177. Hamilton. Boston. Charles C. Little and James Btrown. 1838.
Price: $235.00

8022
Bancroft, George.- Memorial Address on the Life and Character of Abraham Lincoln, Delivered, at the Request of Both Houses of the Congress of America, before Them, in the House of Representatives at Washington, on the 12th of February, 1866. Washington, DC. Government Printing Office. 1866 First Edition. Pages 69 pp.8vo. Brown publisher's cloth with gilt titling and decoration on front cover. First Edition. Protrait frontispiece of Lincoln, with tissue guard, engraved by the Treasury Department Monaghan, I 841. BAL 673D. Owner's Signature of Front Free End Paper: E. Countryman. This was the principal address before Congress, President Andrew Johnson, Gen. Grant, the Chief Justice and Foreign Ministers on Lincoln's birthday in 1866. It is a summary of Lincoln's Life and accomplishments. It is an intellectual hisory of attitudes toward slavery in America and Li ncoln's rise from his humble development to his role in eliminating this institution. The delivery of an address had been offered first to Edwin M. Stanton, but he had declined and Bancroft was then invited to deliver the memorial. The appendix is a journal of the funeral exercises in Congress. Misprint mid-page, under dividing mark, on p.60 in date of current exercises [1865, for 1866]. Slight Wear at Corners and at Head and Tail of Spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $160.00

7797
Jay, William.- A View of the Action of the Federal Government, in Behalf of Slavery. New York. The American Anti-Slavery Society. 1839. Second Edition. Pages 240 pp.12mo. Brown Publisher's Cloth. Second Edition. LCP/HSP Afro-American Catalogue 5268. Rinderknecht 56584. Sabin 35866. Work 327. Am Imp 56584. Cancellation copyright statement pasted to rear of Title Page. A long Introduction by Jay, new for the Second Edition, on the abolitionist movement. Jay, the son of the first chief justice of the United States discusses the slave trade, fugitive slaves and the social pressures on free Blacks. Foxed. Wear to ends of spine. Otherwise, Very Good. A nice, tight copy.
Price: $225.00

9919
[Pamphlet] The Manifesto. Published by the United Societies. Vol. XIII. No. 1. January, 1883. Shaker Village, NH. The United Societies (Shaker). 1891. First Edition. Pages Pp. 217-240.8vo. Illustrated grey printed paper wraps. First Edition. An especially interesting issue of the Shaker journal. Among many articles it contains a poem by Mary Whitcher (1752-97) entitled "Faithfulness," a defense of the Shaker practice of dancing, an argument against capital punishment, a tribute to Mary Whitcher and the music and words to the Shaker hymn, "Humble Petition." Numerous interesting ads. Mild soiling of edges of covers. One sheet roughly opened. Else, Very Good.
Price: $85.00

8369
[Pamphlet] The Manifesto. Published by the United Societies. Vol. XXI. No. 10. October, 1891. Canterbury, NH. The United Societies (Shaker). 1891. First Edition. Pages Pp. 217-240.8vo. Blue Printed Paper Wraps. First Edition. An especially interesting issue of the Shaker journal. "The Kentucky Revival" by Richard M'Nemar, originally published in 1808 and entitled "New Lights and Schismatics" is reprinted. It details the origin of the dance from a series of involuntary exercises as part of Shaker doctrine which functioned to exorcise any tendency to carnal depravity and how dance led to visions and the spirit of prophecy. A second article on "The Shakers and the Cause of Peace" reports the origin of the doctrine of conscientious objection to war by the Shakers in the 1770 revelations to Ann Lee, a doctrine derived from that of the Quakers (Joseph Hoag's 1803 prophecy concerning redemption in part throught the abolition of war). Shakers avoided military service, not by paying bounties to substitutes or claiming medical exemption, but through an open appeal to conscience. This was expressed in America from the Revolutionary War on. Later, Wm. Henry Harrison petitioned the Ohio Legislature to give substitute service to conscientious objectors in place of military service. But it was Abraham Lincoln, in the Civil War, who, with Secretary of War Stanton, pushed through Congress an act exempting Quakers and Shakers from military service and giving them duty to care for sick and wounded soldiers. Very Good.
Price: $85.00

8012
Phillips, Wendell.- [Pamphlet]. Review of Lysander Spooner's Essay on the Unconstitutionality of Slavery. Reprinted from the "Anti-Slavery Standard," with Additions. Boston. Andrews and Prentiss. 1847. First Edition. Pages 95 pp.6to. Printed Paper Wraps. Stab Sewn. First Edition. LCP 8173. Lysander Spooner (1808-1887) was a prominent lawyer of Boston interested in constitutional matters. He was an ardent abolitionist, who was convinced of the unconstitutionality of slavery. He hoped to abolish that institution by judicial action and published a tract on this matter. Wendell Phillips (1811-1884), an orator of Boston, also an abolitionist as well as champion of labor reform and women's suffrage, wanted slavery abolished by legislative action since he considered the constitution to support it. In this pamphlet Phillips reviews Spooner's document and details his disagreements with him. Spooner's works have beeen republished in the modern era by M & S Press and are still in print from the publisher. Of interest, Spooner published another document supporting the unconstitutionality of the guilty verdict of Professor John W. Webster for the celebrated murder of Dr. George Parkman in 1849 on the basis that the jury had not been drawn from Professor Webster's peers, since they all had favored the death penalty. Water Stain. Soiled. Else, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

9928
Scott,Job.- Journal of the Life, Travels and Gospel Labours of That Faithful Servant and Minister of Christ, Job Scott. New-York, NY. Isaac Collins. 1797. First Edition. Pages 360 pp. 12mo. in 6's. Full contemporary brown calf First Edition. Howes, II S228. Sabin 78287. Evans 32810. DAB. Job Scott, a Quaker minister, was born in Providence in 1751 and died of smallpox in 1793 on a visit to Ireland. He had an active life as a minister and teacher, having founded Friends' Schools in Rhode Island, and, beginning shortly after the end of the Revolution, traveled through most of the early stateson his ministerial missions. He often spoke and preached against slavery. A proponent ofquietism. he was often silent but, when so moved by his inner spirit, he was, on those occasions, a fine orator and preacher. He emphasized the spiritual nature of religion, rather than revelation, and inhis day was considered even heretical. Today he appears more of a prophet. His manuscripts and papers reside at the Moses Brown School in Providence. Shaken. Torn leaf pp. 95/96, oversewn for repair. Lacks free end papers. Front cover nearly detached with old oversewn repair. Rear cover detached. Spine and corners worn. Mild browning of page edges with mild foxing. Else Good +.
Price: $395.00

9927
[Sheet Music, Confederacy) Bayley, T. E. (Composer).- Richmond on the "James." First Edition. Louisville, KY and Chicago, IL. D. P. Faulds. 1863. Pages 5 pp.Fo. Disbound sheet music. First Edition. Plate #1374-4. Not in Check List of Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints, 1851-1871. See Parrish & Willingham, Confederate Imprints, #7393-95 (for later imprints). Groce & Wallace, pp. 528, 583. Dichter, Handbook, #502. A Confederate song of the Civil War, published in Louisville in 1863, but also bears a pre-fire Chicago imprint. According to Groce & Wallace, Reed was a general engraver, active in Cincinnati, very near Louisville, in the 1850's, and Slinglandt was a music engraver, active in Louisville from about 1845 to 1870. Born in New Jersey, he had previously worked in New York. Throughout the Civil War, he was in Louisville working with his sons. This song, mourning the loss of a loved one in battle near the James River, far from home, was copyright in 1863, preceding the 1864 issues listed in Confederate Imprints. Dichter reports an 1865 edition by the same Louisville publisher. The notation of Chicago is interesting, for it may have been issued in both a Confederate and Union city. Edges browned Small closed tear in margin of cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

7376
Woolman, John. The Journal of John Woolman. Boston. James R. Osgood and Company. 1871. First Edition,as Such. Pages 315 pp.8vo. Green Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Decorations. First Edition,as Such. Currier, p. 117. Howes II, W669. BAL, 21891. Journal of an 18th C. Anti-Slavery Quaker. He Visited Rhode Island in 1760 and Contributed Greatly to the Ending of Slavery There, at Least among Quakers. Newspaper Review of Teignmouth Shore's Biography of Woolman (Macmillan, ?Date) Laid in. Woolman's Influence Extended Well beyond Quakers. He Wrote Extensively on Uncompensated Labor as Well as Slavery and Argued for Retrospective Compensation to Emancipated Slaves.He published a famous two-part essay entitled "Some Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes, 1754 and 1762. Howes considered the Journal "an autobiographical masterpiece." Rear Free Flyleaf Missing. Wear to Spine Edges. Otherwise Very Good.
Price: $125.00

9826
[Anonymous].- Discussion of the Withdrawal of U.S. Funds from the Second Bank of the U. S. in Philadelphia under Orders from President Andrew Jackson on October 1. 1833 and Their Deposit in State Controlled Banks. In Niles' Weekly Register. Fourth Series. No. 6 - Vol. IX. Vol.XLV, Whole No. 1,150, pp. 81-2. Oct. 5, 1833. First Edition. Baltimore, MD. H. Niles. 1833. Pages 16 pp.8vo. Self wraps. Disbound. First Edition. Andrew Jackson, in his first term as President of the U. S., became convinced that the Second Bank of the U. S., federally chartered, but under the controlof Nicholas Biddle of Philadelphia and with shares owned principally by foreign investors, was a monopoly unhealthy for the United States. There ensued the Bankwar, led in opposition chiefly by Jackson and Biddle and with many political overtones. Jackson threatened the charter of the Bank, but waited until early in his second term for action in the form of withdrawing the government's funds from the Second Bank and depositing them in many independent State-supervised banks. This withdrawal, very controversial because most of his cabinet objected, was led by Roger B. Taney, Jackson's only ally, who was formerly Attorney General, but was now Secretary of the Treasury after Jackson fired the former Secretary, who had balked at moving the government's deposits. This was one of the most controversial episodes inJackson's very controversial administration. Other articles in this issue include an extract of the debate in the British House of Lords on the Emacipation of the Jews, an anecdote about Dr. Benjamin Rush, etc. Very Good.
Price: $75.00

9868
Anonymous- Mormons. The Mormons in Utah. In Littell's Living Age, Vol. XXXIII, No. 411, pp. 10-11, 93-94. April 3, 10, 1852 First Edition. Boston. E. Littell and Co. 1852. Pages 12 pp.8vo. Disbound. Rebound in grey library folder with black linen spine and typed titling on paper label. First Edition. Illustrated. Cornell, Making of America Web Site. Two ironic and critical articles, from British sources, about Mormons and Mormonism, reprinted promptly in this American magazine. The writers expect Mormonism not to survive, especially in Utah, but call for its forcible destruction to assure its fate. Near Fine.
Price: $20.00

6350
Bowen, Emanuel.- A Map of the British American Plantations, Extending from Boston in New England to Georgia; including All the Back Settlements in the Respective Provinces; as Far as the Mississippi. Framed. First Edition. London. Gentleman's Magazine. 1754. Pages 1 p.11" x 9" + margins. Framed. Uncolored. '. First Edition. Gohm, "Antique Maps," p.24. Tooley, Maps aqnd Map-Makers, pp.56, 71. Engraved by Thomas Bowen in July, 1754. An outstanding map of the British Colonies in America. Emanuel Bowen (fl. 1700-60) was Geographer to His Majesty (George II and to Louis XV) (Tooley) and a prolific maker of maps in wide usage in mid-18th century. His business was continued by his son Thomas Bowen until shortly before he died in the Workhouse in 1790 (Gohm). This map is very detailed in the colonies east of the Mississippi. The territory west of the Mississippi is labeled Louisiana. Latitude is marked as is Longitude, based on the Greenwich meridien, not yet settled for the world. An elaborately detailed cartouche portraying a Native American family, the father with a bow and, nearby, a white man, appearing dead impaled by an arrow.. Very Good to Near Fine.
Price: $975.00

7521
[Child, Lydia Maria]. (pseudonym: The Author of Hobomok). - The Frugal Housewife. Dedicated to Those Who Are Not Ashamed of Economy. To Which Is Added Hints to Persons of Moderate Fortune. Third Edition. Corrected and Arranged by the Author. Boston. Carter and Hendee. 1830. Pages 128 pp.12mo. Original Printed Paper Covered Boards. Linen Spine Detached. Third Edition. Corrected and Arranged by the Author. Lowenstein, 131 A very popular household and cookery book, authored by Lydia Maria Child and aimed at an audience of limited means. It went through many editions. Its title was later changed to "The American Frugal Housewife," in order to avoid confusion with the English counterpart by Susannah Carter Covers loose, stained and ragged. Linen spine detached. Lacks front free end paper. Some foxing and staining of text. Neat tear of Index Pages. Recipes for varnish for soap boxes and for sponge cake handwritten (when?) on rear end papers. Else, Good + (considering a book that was much used).
Price: $200.00

7619
[Child, Lydia Maria]. (pseudonym: The Author of Hobomok). - The Frugal Housewife. Dedicated to Those Who Are Not Ashamed of Economy. To Which Are Added Hints to Persons of Moderate Fortune.First Published in the Massachusetts Journal. Sixth Edition. Corrected and Arranged by the Author. Boston. Carter, Hendee and Babcock. 1831. Pages 120 pp.4to. Polished Contemporary Full Calf. Sixth Edition. Corrected and Arranged by the Author. Mantle Fielding, Enlarged Edition, pp.232-3. Lowenstein #131. Owner's signature in beautiful calligraphic hand on front free flyleaf: "Almira Towne/ Kennebunk Port 1831." A gorgeous large bookplate on front pastedown: Erasmus Hall no.599. An outstanding example of the work of [Peter?] Maverick (signed in engraving), the Master of three generations of a noted family of engravers and one of the founders of the National Academy of Design (Fielding). Peter Maverick (1780-1831) was one of three printmaker sons of a printmaker. He was noted as an engraver of bookplates, maps, bank notes and book and magazine illustrations. He established a partnership between 1817 and 1820 with his apprentice Asher B. Durand. Among others,he designed the plates for the Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New York using the then new process of lithography. A very popular household and cookery book, authored by Lydia Maria Child and aimed at an audience of limited means. It went through many editions. Its title was later changed to "The American Frugal Housewife," in order to avoid confusion with the English counterpart by Susannah Carter. The combination of this illustrious cookbook and a Maverick-engraved bookplate produces a book of extreme rarity. Covers Detached. Lacks Spine Cover. Some Foxing. First signature loose. Else Very Good.
Price: $1,000.00

9853
Cobbett, William.- American Political Register. Volume XXX. From January to June, 1816, Inclusive. Copy Right Secured according to Law. First Edition. New York. H. Cobbett and G. S. Oldfield. Van Winkle & Wiley, Printers. 1816. Pages 818 pp.8vo. Half brown calf and blue marbled boards. First Edition. Frontispiece portrait of William cobbett Gaines 71a Cobbett's Weekly Register in its American version. Published in New York by William Cobbett's nephew, Henry Cobbett. William Cobbett (1763-1835), a pamphleteer of verbal and stylistic skill, lived in America from 1793 to 1800. He was a vocal and respected critic of America, but he was successfully sued for a libel of Dr. Benjamin Rush for the latter's therapy of yellow fever by blood-letting. He supported America in the War of 1812 and moved from America to England and back, several times, usually in advance of the authorities in consequence of his sharp-tongued pamphlets. Here are many "letters", actually essays, addressed to Americans, or to the British, or to Parliament, typically for Cobbett addressing their presumed errors and perfidies. Cobbett is a vigorous defender of a free press. Spine ends worn. Front cover nearly detached.. Board ends worn. Covers abraded. Else, Very Good.
Price: $200.00

9807
Donald, David.- Lincoln's Herndon. Introduction by Carl Sandburg. First Edition, later printing (? book-club edition). New York. Alfred A. Knopf. 1948. Pages 378 pp. + xxiii pp. Index.8vo. Light green publisher's cloth. First Edition, later printing (? book-club edition). A biography of William H. Herndon, who was Abraham Lincoln's close friend and his law partner. Herndon became Lincoln's biographer based on his first hand experience and his collected Lincolniana Herndon was "his companion of the boisterous circuit-riding days - mayor of Springfield - a political boss - a poet and a dreamer - a man of books and memories, whose reach was greater than his grasp".The author is David Donald, a Pulitzer prize winning (twice) biographer and recognized authority on Lincoln. Soiling of spine. Lacks D.J. Else, Very Good.
Price: $12.00

9816
[Early Baseball Image]. Barrow, Frances Elizabeth (pseudonym: Aunt Fanny).- The Second Little Pet Book, with the Tasle of Puss and John. First Edition. New-York. W. H. Kelley & Brother. 1863. Pages 193 pp.12mo (4 3/4" x 5 1/2"). Embossed purple cloth. Image of boy holding baseball and baseball bat with girl bearing a hoop embossed on front and rear covers, with image gilt on front cover, in the blind on rear cover. Decorative gilt titling on spine. Orange end papers. T.e.g. First Edition. Illustrated with wood engravings. Appleton's Cycloped. Am. Biog. (for Aunt Fanny). Frances Barrow (1822-?), was born of a Boston mother and a Charleston father in South Carolina, but lived most of her life iin New York. She married in1841, and in1855 she began a very successful writing career. In the next fifteen years she produced 25 works, mostly juveniles, which were very successful and were put out by several publishers. She also wrote a novel, "The Wife's Strategem." Her work was translated into French, German and Swedish "and is characterized by a peculiarly bright and captivating way of presenting homely, every-day scenes and sayings." (App. Cycl.). This juvenile is very characteristic of her work. Somewhat harder to come by than most of her output, the volume is particularly desirable for its early image of baseball as a boy's sport, the game having been invented only recently. Covers faded except for rather bright gilt image on front cover. Covers cracking at hinges with uppermost inch of spine pasted down. Else, Good +.
Price: $275.00

9866
Ely, Richard T.- Economic Aspects of Mormonism. In Harper's Monthly Magazine. Vol. CVI, No. DCXXXV, pp. 667-678. April, 1903. First Edition. New York. Harper and Brothers. 1903. Pages 12 pp.8vo. Disbound. Rebound in grey library folder with black linen spine and typed titling on paper label. First Edition. Illustrated. The author, Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin, argues that the strength of Mormonism as an institution is derived from its strength as a religion. Self-sacrifice for the good of the whole, discipline,dependence on education, cohesion and cooperation uniquely lead to the economic success of the organization. Near Fine.
Price: $20.00

9869
Fitch, George Hamlin.- How California Came into the Union. In The Century Magazine. Vol. XL, No. 5, pp. 775-792, September, 1890 First Edition. New York. The Century Company. 1890. Pages 12 pp.8vo. Disbound. Rebound in grey library folder with black linen spine and typed titling on paper label. First Edition. Illustrated. Cornell, Making of America Web Site. Two articles on early California: the first a detailed illustrated history of California and its entry into the United states of America. A second article (pp. 792-797) highlights several notes on Californiana, including one by Lafayette H. Bunnell, one of the participants, on the discovery of Yosemite in March, 1851. Near Fine.
Price: $20.00

6741
Hersey, John.- Hiroshima. First Edition. New York. The New Yorker Magazine. 1946. Pages 68 pp.8 1/2" x 11 1/2" Original colored illustrated magazine covers. First Edition. The first appearance of "Hiroshima ," published as the entire issue of The New Yorker for Aug. 31, 1946. This was the first time in history that an entire issue of a magazine was devoted to a single article. The New York Times Book Review calls this the best of the books that have been written about the most spectacular explosion in human experience. John Hersey, a novelist whose subjects are events of contemporary history , visited Hiroshima in 1946 and interviewed survivors of the first atomic bomb attack. The six survivors he wrote about detailed their lives before and after the bomb, with personal assessment of their survival and subsequent illnesses and sorrow. It was a personally rewarding and a growth experience for Hersey. Also for his readers. Hinge of cover starting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $200.00

6790
Hyde, John, Jun.- Mormonism: Its Leaders and Designs. First Edition. New York. W. P. Fetridge & Co. 1857. Pages 335 pp. + 24 pp. publisher's ads.12mo. Embossed brown publisher's cloth with gilt decoration on front cover and gilt titling on spine. Other decorations in the blind. Yellow end papers. The images on the covers are presumably part of the Mormon Kabbalah. First Edition. Frontispiece portrait of Brigham Young. Illustrated with wood engravings on plates. Flake 4164. Sabin 34124. A biography of Brigham Young coupled with the author's commentary from personal experience as a Mormon. A commentary on church doctrine. Lacks free end papers, front and rear. Front hinge cracking internally. Modest pencil notations pp. 111-114. Plates browned. Mild foxing. Wear at head and tail of spine with 1 1/2" chip from head of spine. Text block tight and Very Good.
Price: $195.00

9867
Ingersoll, Ernest.- Salt Lake City. In Harper's New Monthly Magazine. Vol. LXIX, No. 411, pp. 388-404. August, 1884. First Edition. New York. Harper and Brothers. 1884. Pages 17 pp.8vo. Disbound. Rebound in grey library folder with black linen spine and typed titling on paper label. First Edition. Illustrated. A history of the urban environment of Salt Lake City, intertwined, as it is, with Mormons and the history of Mormonism Near Fine.
Price: $20.00

9836
Jeffries, John.- An Account of the Last Illness of the Late Daniel Webster, Secretary of State; with a Description of the Post-Mortem Appearences, &c. In the New-Hampshire Journal of Medicine, Vol. III, No. 4, January, 1853, pp.85-95, Reprinted from the Am. Journ. of Med. Sciemce. First Edition. Concord, NH. G. Parker Lyon. 1852-3. 8vo. Printed paper wrappers. Issues bound together on cords. First Edition. Fulton and Stanton, Centenn. Surg. Anesthesia. Jeffries expresses his appreciation to Dr. S. Parkman for editorial work on this paper originally read, from notes, to the Suffolk District Medical Society. Parkman was related to Dr. George Parkman, who had been murdered at Harvard Medical School by Prof. John White Webster in 1849. This issue of the New-Hampshire Journal of Medicine is part of a 12 issue run of this journal, from Volume 2, No. 10, June, 1852 to Volume 3, No 9, July, 1853. Ownership signature on each cover "Dr. D. R. Story." Some issues carry advertisements for medicinals and devices: e.g., for Thomas's American Mechanical Leech, including Breast Glass, Cupping Glass and Eye Glass; also for Leeches!, Sweedish Leeches. Another article of great importance is a reprint from the Boston Traveller (a newspaper) of an article on deaths from the use of chloroform, occurring at the Massachusetts General Hospital (where ether had been first used for anesthesia only 3 years earlier). The report was written by Dr. J[ohn] C[ollins] Warren, member of an illustrious Boston medical family and one involved in the earliest usage and reports on sujrgical anesthesia. Most interestingly, the editor asks several very cogent questions concerning the ethical issues raised by these deaths and their report in a newspaper. A third important article is a review of Lead Diseases, mostly translated from the French of L. Tanqurel des Planches with additions by Samuel Dana (Vol. III, No. 3, December, 1852, pp. 57-56), including a plea to abandon lead from the pharmacopoiea. Front wrapper of first number detached. Chipping of edges of frontmost and rearmost wraps. All else present and intact. Else, Very Good.
Price: $150.00

6907
[Mackay , Charles].- The Mormons, or Latter-Day Saints: A Contemporary History. With Memoirs of the Life and Death of Joseph Smith, the "American Mahomet". Illustrated. First Edition London. Office of the National Illustrated Library. 1851. Pages 326 pp. + 18 pp. illustrated publisher's catalogue8vo. Brown elaborately embossed publisher's cloth with elaborate gilt decoration and titling on spine. Yellow end papers. First Edition Illustrated with forty engravings. Flake 5179. Sabin 47126 . A good history of the Mormons in their westward movement. Printed by Henry Vizitelly. Has the engraved title page (vignette of "The Expulsion of the Mormons from Nauvoo") as well as the printed title page. Sabin attributes the volume to Henry Mayhew, claiming Mackay as the editor. Wear at ends of spine, very mild at corners. Owner's signature on front free end paper. Front hinge barely starting internally. Else, Very Good
Price: $275.00

9870
Morse, Jedidiah, and Rev. Elijah Parish.- A New Gazetteer of the Eastern Continent; or, a Geographical Dictionary: Containing, in Alphabetical Order, a Description of All the Countries, Kingdoms, States, Cities, Towns, Principal Rivers, Lakes, Harbours, Mountains, &c. &c. in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Their Adjacent Islands. Carefully Compiled from the Best Authorities. Designed as a Second Volume, to the American Gazetteer. First Edition. Charlestown, [MA]. Samuel Etheridge. 1802. Pages Unpaginated. With Appendix, List of Subscribers and Directions to the Binder.8vo. Full contemporary tan speckled calf with red leather label titled and ruled in gilt on the spine. The numeral "2" embossed in spine panel. Printed in two columns. First Edition. Illustrated with seventeen folding maps, as called for in Directions to the Binder. DNB. Morse (1761-1826), the father of the painter-inventor Samuel F. B. Morse, is considered "The Father of American Geography" (DNB). Trained as a minister, he helped found the Andover Theological Seminary and The New England Tract Society, and he actively opposed the Unitarian Heresy. A staunch Federalist, he was as conservative in politics as in religion. While teaching school in New Haven, he became interested in geography. Among his early publications, and his most important, were "The American Gazetteer" in 1797 and this volume, "A New Gazetteer of the Eastern Continent. " in 1802. These books, in their multiple editions and abridgements, dominated their field in America. This copy of the first edition inscribed on Preface page in contemporary calligraphic hand, "Joseph Carver's Book 1803." Wear at head and tail of spine and edges of covers. Hinges starting. Mild browning of pages. Fold worn on map of Spain and Portugal. Else, a tight Very Good copy of this rare work.
Price: $595.00

9696
[Anonymous].- The Anti-Slavery Meeting. The Formation of the Anti-Slavery Society and the Constitution of the New-York Anti-Slavery Society. In Niles' Weekly Register. Fourth Series. no. 7 – Vol. IX. Vol.XLV, Whole No. 1,151, pp. 11–2. Baltimore, MD. H. Niles. 1833. 16 pp. 8vo. Self wraps. Disbound. First Edition. A notice had appeared in the New York Commercial Advertiser of Oct. 3,1833, reprinted in this issue of Nikes' Register, calling all Southerners then in New York to attend and disrupt the anti-slavery meeting. The meeting was barred from Clinton Hall and had to be transferred ultimately to Tammany Hall. Niles' Register quotes (with approbation) a diatribe against William Lloyd Garrison who had just returned from England. Further a meeting of those in favor of the immediate emancipation of slaves was reported to have been held at Chatham Street Chapel, where the formation of the Anti-Slavery Society was noted and a Constitution, here reprinted, was adopted. The larger meeting at Tammany Hall passed resolutions supporting slavery and the Southern States. In conclusion Niles satirized the meeting of the Anti-Slavery Society.Also in this issue is a report of the visit of Daniel Webster to Pittsburgh, the honors accorded him and the text of an address by Webster on various issues including his support of President Jackson despitediffering with him on the bank question, and his general support of mercantile and manufacturing interests, an issue important to Pittsburgh citizens. There is also a retelling of the Boston Tea Party by the last surviving witness to it and a report of the oppositionof the Duke of Wellington to the British emancipation of slaves in the West
Price: $125.00

9727
Anonymous.- [Broadside} The Point of Pines Third Annual Midsummer Musical Festival under the Direction of J. Thomas Baldwin. Aug. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 [1886] -- Eight Days. Great Soloists! Hundreds of Musicians! Famous Bands! New Musical Novelties! Boston. Boston Job Print. 1886. 1 p. 10 3/8" (H) x 14 3/8"(W) First Edition. A 19th century broadside announcing a music festival at a popular resort near Boston (a part of Revere Beach). Train departure times announced as well at a call to the Bay State Agricultural Society's Cattle Show and Fair, scheduled for October. There is also an encouragement to purchase tickets early for the Firework Drama (The Pyrorama) scheduled for almost every evening and featuring the "Great Naval Combat between the Monitor , Merrimac," et al. The verso has the details of the programs featuring numerous bands and soloists and "Grand Opera Day" on Saturday. A good picture of popular entertainment in the latter part of the 19th century. Separated at center fold (easily repairabale). 3/4" closed tear in right margin into right printed border. Chips from right margin not involving text. Mild browning of page. Else Very Good.
Price: $115.00

9602
Anonymous (? Stephen C. Foster).- [Broadside]. Uncle Ned, as Sung by De Colored Society in General. N.P. N.Pub. N.D.[ca 1850–55] 1 4 3/8" x 7 5/8" Unbound sheet. First Edition. A lament in memory of a beloved Black slave, deceased at advanced age, yet a hard worker to the end. Lamented even by his slavemaster. While undated, the text style, format, etc. show it to be in the period 1845–55. Variants of Uncle Ned were part of the early history of minstrelsy in America. Stephen Foster is credited with an 1845 (published 1848) variant of this song (se Walters, Stephen Foster), which may have been the basis of all other variants. Fuld claims that Foster, despite his debts to minstrelsy, had never incorrectly or improperly claimed originality for his music. The precise text of this broadside is printed with illustration in White's New Melodeon Song Book of 1848, where it is reported to have been "sung by that inimitable performer, Mr. Charles White, at his Melodeon Concert saloon, New York." White's Band of Serenaders were among the prominent group of singers that includes the Christys, the Campbells and the Sable Brothers. Charles White (1821–?), according to the biography in his New Ethiopian Song Book (1850), abandoning horse racing and work as a druggist's assistant, took up the accordion and singing with the Virginia Serenaders, the first band to introduce females to the business of minstrelsy. He claimed authorship of numerous songs including "Nelly was a Lady" and "Carry MeBack to Ole Virginia", most likely the production of James Bland (see Toll's "Blacking Up"; copyright was loosely observed in this period and rival claims to rights to songs by various minstrel groups were common). White had become the proprietor of the "Melodeon' theatre and saloon on the Bowery in New York about 1838–41. In possible confirmation of the dateof publication, we also have a Dickens novel published by Peterson in 1855 with publisher's ads for these songsters. 3/4" tear in upper right margin, not involving text. Two corners lack tiny chip. Else, Very Good. White's New Illustrated Melodeon Song Book (p. 24) and White's New Ethiopian Song Book (pp. vii–xii), both published in the period 1851–55, by T. B. Peterson (Philadelphia, 1854). Podeschi D25-26 (for Peterson)
Price: $350.00

9661
[Dwight, Edwin Welles].- Memoirs of Henry Obookiah, a Native of Owhyhee, and a Member of the Foreign Mission School; Who Died at Cornwall, Conn. Feb. 17, 1818, Aged 26 Years. Bound with Four Items: (1) A Sermon Delivered at the Funeral of Henry Obookiah, a Native of Owhyhee, and a Member of the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, February 18, 1818. By Lyman Beecher, A.M. (2) The Banner of Christ Set Up. A Sermon Delivered at the Inauguration of the Rev. Hermon (sic) Daggett, as Principal of the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, May 6, 1818. By Joseph Harvey, A.M. (3) An Inauguration Address, Delivered at the Opening of the Foreign Mission School./ May 6, 1818. By Herman Daggett, A.M. (4) The Inaugural Address [to Herman Daggett of the Foreign Mission School] by the Hon. John Treadwell, Esq. New-Haven. Nathan Whiting, Agent of the Foreign Mission School. S. Converse, Printer. 1819. 129, 40, 32, 8, 6 pp. No frontispiece portrait in this issue. 12mo. Full brown contemporary calf. Gilt rules on spine. First Edition. Obookiah was born in Hawaii and came to the U.S. in 1809. "After witnessing the massacre of his family, Obookiah.decided to leave Hawaii. . . An American ship [the Triumph under Captain Brintnall ] touched at the islands, and Obookiah sailed by way of China to New York. Through Obookiah, interest was awakened in the Hawaiians, which led to the American mission in Hawaii in 1820." — Hill p. 91-92. (Quoted by Ten Pound Island) . In the US, he attended the Foreigh Mission School. He had translated the Book of Genesis into Hawaiian, but he died of typhoid fever before he could go back to Hawaii as a missionary.. "This book did more than any other work to interest the general public of New England in supporting a mission to the Hawaiian Islands proposed by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. It narrates the life of Henry Obookiah (or Opukakaia), born in Hawwaii about the year 1792. As a youth he sailed to America, arriving there in 1809, and for a period made his home with Captain Brintnall in New Haven, Connecticut. At Yale College, his desire for knowledge was recognized, and he began instruction by private tutors, earning his support as a farm hand. -- Forbes, Hawaiian National Bibliography, 478. There are .... additional titles bound with the main text, which, although separately paginated, are contiguous in registration, and are an integral part of the work. Forbes, Treasures, 58. First Edition." (Quoted by Lefkowicz) Covers bruised. Pages browned. Lacks front free end paper. Gilt ruling faded.Else, Very Good. Hill, pp. 91-2. Sabin,56429 (Obookiah) and 4342 (Beecher); the last three sermons not recorded. Not in Howes.
Price: $325.00

9617
Goodspeed, Rev. E. J.- History of the Great Fires in Chicago and the West. A Proud Career Arrested by Sudden and Awful Calamity; Towns and Counties Laid Waste by the Devastating Element. Scenes and Incidents, Losses and Sufferings, Benevolence of the Nations, Etc., Etc. With a History of the Rise and Progress of Chicago, the "Young Giant." To Which Is Appended a Record of Great Fires in the Past. New York. H. S. Goodspeed & Co. 1871. 676 pp. Numerous engravings including some double page spreads. Frontispiece folded map of Chicago, colored to show the burned area. 8vo. Embossed brown publisher's cloth with gilt decorative titling on spine. A.e. marbled. First Edition. A very early report of the Chicago Fire, attended by a description of early Chicago and comparisons with other great midwestern urban fires. Printed, apparently, while the embers were still smoldering. The map is a good view of the layout of the early city and the illustrations are outstanding views of Americana and urban Chicago, whose buildings, even in ruins, appear grand. This volume, usually found in terrible shape, is presented here with limited faults. Goodspeed was noted for his sermon /eulogy on Lincoln's death in 1865 (Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints, #941). Mild wear at edges of spine and boards. Boards warped. Cracks in cloth on rear board. one signature shaken, at appendix. Mild browning. Frontispiece torn at corner with mild wear at folds. Entire map present and otherwise clean. Else, Very Good
Price: $135.00

9356
Paine, Thomas. Through the Hand of Horace G. Wood, Medium.- The Philosophy of Creation: Unfolding the Laws of the Progressive Development of Nature, and Embracing the Philosophy of Man, Spirit, and the Spirit World. Boston. Bela Marsh. 1860. 120 pp. 12mo. Printed grey paper wraps. Third Edition. A preface by H. A. Burbank reports that this volume started out to be a comprehensive multivolume review of natural science and human experience as revealed through the power of the spirits. The ill-health of the medium prevented its completion. Accordingly a séance was held consisting of the medium, H. G. Wood from Vermont, James Marsh (the President of the University of Vermont), Ethan Allen, Benjamin Day and Thomas Paine. The latter was selected to record the information resulting. Proof of Paine's participation is derived from graphological and stylistic study of the manuscript. Burbank claims this to be the best of Paine's writings. The publication was pressed by many distinguished Spiritualists. The material and spiritual composition of the universe are reviewed. Christ's appearance is discussed and the nature of the Spirit considered in detail. The organization of Spirit Land is detailed. Signature of E. Bartlett, in pencil, on front cover. Tucked in is a small bookplate imprinted: "Kennebec Natural History and Antiquarian Society. Presented by Erastus Bartlett. October, 1892." Slight wear with small chips from spine. Spine lettered with title in ink. Two stab holes at inner margin, probably from secondary binding. Pencil markings of some paragraphs in margins. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

9719
[Pamphlet] The New York Historical Society.- Proceedings and Addresses at the Presentation of The New York Historical Society's Gold Medal to Dr. Wilberforce Eames in Recognition of His Scholarship and His Unselfish Devotion to the Interests of All Researchers in the Field of American Historical Literature and the Unveiling of His Portrait Painted for the Society by Mr. DeWitt M. Lockman on the Occasion of the One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Anniversary of the Society. Friday, November 20, 1931. New York. Printed for The New York Historical Society. 1932. Illustrated. Grey printed stiff paper wraps. First Edition. The proceedings of the award ceremony from The New York Historical Society to Wilberforce Eames, Librarian tothe Society and the great bibliographer. Includes an address by Lawrence C. Wroth, entitled "Ezekiel, or the Good Bibliographer." In this, Wroth discusses Eames prominence as a bibliographer, in fleshing out the dry bones of hstory and literature, as well as his enormous influence on the major bibliographic works of his lifetime. Minor staining of edges of covers. Else, Very Good..
Price: $35.00

9732
Wayland, Francis.- [Pamphlet]. The Affairs of Rhode-Island, a Discourse Delivered at the Meeting-House of the First Baptist Church, Providence, May 22, 1842. Providence, RI. R. Cranston & Co. and H. H.Brown. 1842. 32 pp. 8vo. Light brown printed paper wraps. Second Edition. A speech in opposition to the principles of Thomas Dorr and his party by the noted Baptist minister, social philosopher and president of Brown University, Francis Wayland. It was delivered as the most violent period of the Dorr War was evolving in 1842. The conservative Dr. Wayland argues against the threat of "anarchy," "lawless soldiery" and acts which "question the very existence of society." He argues against the adoption of a new constitution by declaring the existing one void. Rather he proposes the working of a new constitution through using the laws of the existing one. Wayland misses the fallacy of the then existing constitution of Rhode Island, a document descended from the early 17th century Carolingian charter of the colony, which restricted voting rights to the landed classes in a new industrial society where the holding of property was no longer the mark of investment in the social order. It took about 50 more years for the constitution of Rhode Island to begin to enlarge the franchise and, because of the unbalanced power of the legislature, the government of Rhode Island remains today a parliamentary system and some of the evils that Dorr contested persist today.Some of the violent anti-Dorr opinion by Wayland had a nativist basis. Owner's inscription at head of title page: Dear Thomas Kendall / With regards of / L. A. Lovell. Ex libris with library stamps on recto and verso of front cover and on title page. Modest library label at foot of front cover. Chips from two corners of cover and chips from spine. Beginning separation of covers. Else, Very Good. J. R. Bartlett, p.269. Gettleman, pp. 117n, 147n, 246.
Price: $175.00

9035
Shaw, O[liver].- The Meeting, a Popular New Song from "Leisure Hours at Sea" as Sung by the Author at His Private Concerts. Composed and Inscribed to His Friend Miss Mary Ann Howard by O. Shaw. Providence, RI. Privately published by the Author. 1829. 4 pp. Fo. Disbound. First Edition. Appleton's Cycloped. Am. Biog. Dichter's Handbook. Wolfe, II, pp. 787–795. A charming song, in a rather florid style, of separation after a brief but very affectionate meeting . Written by Oliver Shaw (1779–1848) a musician, singer, psalmodist, composer, publisher and teacher who lived in Providence and wrote many very popular ballads. He was known as the "blind singer" having accidentally blinded himself in one eye as a youth and become totally blind at age 29. This song not in Wolfe's extensive bibliography of Shaw, nor in the website of the 19th Century Music Project, nor in the Lester S. Levey Collection at Johns Hopkins. Scant foxing. Short tears at spine and foot of pp.3/4. Else, Very Good
Price: $65.00

9538
Davis, A[sahel].- A Lecture on the Discovery of America by the Northmen, Five Hundred Years before Columbus. Delivered in New York, New Haven, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and Other Cities: also in Some of the First Literary Institutions of the Union. New York. Bartlett & Co. 1840 24 pp. Illustrated. 8vo. Yellow printed and illustrated paper wraps. Fifth Edition. The author, born in Massachusettsin 1791, a former chaplain of the New York Senate, begins his popular lecture with a review of the highly developed culture of Palenque in what is now Mexico. His illustration, he feels, evokes the spirit of Spurzheim in its phrenological implications. He then ranges over topics like the origin of American Indians. He cites Danish and Icelandic sources as evidence that the Norseman Leif discovered American lands south of Greenland. He alleges that Benjamin Franklin was of this view, too. The Icelandic Norseman Leif supposedly reached Cape Cod and Narragansett Bay in contemporary Rhode Island. The possibility is raised that Columbus was aware of the voyages of the Norsemen to America before his 1492 voyage. There is a final note dating Christianity in America to antiquity long earlier than Columbus. On verso of rear cover are endorsements of the lecture by dfignitaries, including Mrs. [Emma] Willard of the Troy Female Seminary. Other publications by Davis include "Ancient America and Researches of the East." Owner's signature in ink on front cover ("Wm. H. Richardson-"). Slightly dusty. Else, Very Good +. App.Cycloped.Am.Biog. (for Davis). Sabin 18794 (attributed to Ashel [sic!] Davis).
Price: $85.00

9540
Holmes, Oliver Wendell.- Oration Delivered before the City Authorities at Boston, on the Eighty-Seventh Anniversary of the National Independence of America. Philadelphia. N.Publ. [? Union League of Philadelphia]. 1863. 30 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Printed paper wraps. First Edition. This issue: "Printed in Philadelphia for gratuitous distribution." Also issued in Boston in several formats, one tras a Supplement to the Boston Advertiser on July 6, 1863. According to BAL, there is no priority among the various issues. This issue is also Type A, of BAL, without statement at head of front wrapper. On the anniversary of American independence from Great Britain, amidst the dark days of the Civil War, at a time when anti-draft riots were breaking out in New York, Boston and elsewhere, Holmes addresses, with facility and eloquence, the roots of the Civil War and the actions required of a free democracy. Very Good +. BAL 8826.
Price: $110.00

9541
M'Clure, Alexander W.- [Chapbook] The Life-Boat: A Parable. Lowell, MA. A. Upton. 1841. 31 pp. 16mo. Tan stiff paper covers, with printed titling and decorative border on front cover and printed hymn to "Christian Warfare" in decorative border on rear cover. Decorated First Edition. A Christian parable with the tale of a ship enticed by a deceptive pirate to destruction on a rocky shore, with a lifeboat offered by the Captain of Salvation. Some are still enticed by presumptive treasures, some by blind concern for status in life. Some were almost persuaded but drowned with uncertainty or because of only half-hearted reach for salvation. For some salvation was never in question and its realization was complete. A rare early pamphlet, with only one copy recorded (in Lowell, MA). Spine chipped and cracking on 75% of length. Few faint stains. Else, Very Good. AmImprints 41-3217 (only one copy recorded; in Lowell, MA)
Price: $145.00

9542
Whittier, John G[reenleaf] and Lowell, James Russell.- [Pamphlet]. No. 9. Read and Circulate. The Branded Hand. Salem, OH. The Anti-Slavery Bugle. N.D. [1845] 4 pp. (single folded sheet) Illustrated. 8vo. Self-binding. First Edition. An abolitionist poem by Whittier, based on the story of Jonathan Walker (1799–1878), captain of a fishing boat in his youth, but a railroad contractor in Florida after 1840. A reformer and abolitionist, in 1844 he helped slaves escape in an open boat headed to the West Indies. He took sick on the trip, was captured at sea and taken to Pensacola, where he was imprisoned. Convicted in a US court, he was fined, pilloried and branded "SS" (Slave Stealer) on his right hand.and jailed for 11 months, until his fine was paid by some abolitionists. For the next 5 years he lectured on slavery, then moved to Michigan, where a monument was erected to him in 1878. He was celebrated here by Whittier's poem "The Branded Hand" in this issue of The Anti-Slavery Bugle, an unusual Ohio imprint. Lowell contributes lines of another long poem decrying slavery on the occasion of the murder of a group of escaped slaves near Washington. Most bibliographers (e.g. Carroll Wilson, Currier) describe the Philadelphia printing, not being aware (according to Siegel, M & S Rare Books) of this Ohio Imprint. Small stain of foxing through the four pages. Else, Very Good. AmImp 45-6701. BAL 21740 (Whittier); BAL 13050 (Lowell). Appleton's Cyclope. Am. Biog. (for Walker). Cooke, p. 46 (for Boston edition of Lowell). Currier, pp. 56–8, 216–7. Not in LCP/HSP Afro-Americana Catalogue.
Price: $225.00

9604
[Chapbook]. Anonymous.- The Bunker Hill Songster. New York. Wm. H. Murphy, Printer and Publisher. N.D. [ca. 1840]. 34 pp. Illustrated. 2 3/4" x 4 3/8". Blue printed paper wraps, illustrated with comic view of a Revolutionary War soldier. Sewn. First Edition. Bieber 172. A small chapbook of contemporary song dealing with war, patriotism, sentiment, blacks and comedy. References to contemporary singers, composers and patriots (e.g., the Ethiopian Singers). Contains “The Green Mountain Boys” by Wm. Cullen Bryant. Decorated with woodcuts of an eagle, butterfly, flowere and a row of soldiers, as wellas a fullpage woodcut and the comic cover illustration.. Small chip from spine over 1/2" at foot of spine. Else, Very Good +. Bright and tight.
Price: $150.00

9627
Work, Frederick J. (Editor).- Folk Songs of the American Negro. Number Two. Introduction by John W. Work, M.A. Nashville, TE. Work Bros. & Hart Co. 1907. 64 pp. 8vo. Printed brown stiff paper wraps. Stapled. First Edition. A second collection of "Plantation Melodies," traditionally associated with Blacks in slavery. The first public singing of them was by the Fisk Jubilee Singers, organized by the Latin teacher at Fiske, John W. Work and had been published in 1871. This second collection is edited, arranged and published by the Works. The introduction by John W. Work draws the reflection of these songs in the inner life of Black Americans and points out their closeness to Black spirituality. F. J. Work was also a composer Small faint stain at margin of frontcover. Else, Very Good +. M. N. Work, Biblio. Negro,p.436. Davis, Am. Negro Ref. Bk., p.733. Porter, Negro in US, #1617. Blockson 8005.
Price: $125.00

9673
Root, Geo[rge] F[rederick].- [Sheet Music]. The Battle Cry of Freedom. Chicago. Root & Cady. 1862. 5 pp. Fo. Elaborately illustrated decorative cover. Engraving by Copcutt-Williams. Disbound. Publisher's ads on verso of front and rear covers. First Edition (second issue). Plate #225-4. One of the great marching songs for the Union Army written by George F. Root (1820–1895) and published early in the Civil War. An ante-fire Chicago imprint and immensely popular, it was also known as "Rally Round the Flag, Boys." It was written in 1861 in response to President Lincoln's second call for troops."During the Battle of the Wilderness in May, 1864, a brigade of the Ninth Corps broke the enemy's lines by assault, became exposed to a flank attack, and were almost routed. A soldier in the Forty-fifth Pennsylvania rallied the lines with this song." (Scribners, First Ed. Famous Am. Songs., Cat. #105). Root, a New Englander, wrote popular ballads and moved to Chicago in 1859 to join his brother's newly formed music publishing business. His Civil War songs becameextremely popular, especially this one, which was introduced publicly from manuscript in 1861 by Frank and Jules Lombard at a War rally in Chicago. This copy of the first edition has an elaborately engraved cover in contrast to the bland first issue printed cover. Minimal foxing of margins. Else, Very Good. V. B. Lawrence, pp. 362–3. Civil War songbook, pp. 1–4. Dichter, Handbook, 275–6. Ewen, Pop. Am. Comp., pp. 144–5. Dichter & Shapiro, p. 115. Not in Am.Imp. Inv., Chicago Ante-Fire Imp.
Price: $175.00

9674
Russell, Henry.- [Sheet Music]. The Chase _ Set Every Inch of Canvas. Composed by Henry Russell for His New Entertainment "Negro Life" _ Words by Angus B. Reach Esq. London. Musical Bouquet Office. & J. Allen. N.D. 4 pp. Fo. Self wraps with illustrated cover. Disbound First Edition. Plate #370. An ironical song of the slave trade by Henry Russell. Russell (1812–1900) was born in England of Jewish parentage. He studied with Bellini and was acquainted with Rossini, Donizetti and Meyerbeer. To seek his fortune he moved to America from 1833 to 1841, where his income came from his concerts (piano and voice recitals), not from his immensely popular sheet music, for which he received no royalties. Among his famous works are "Woodman, Spare That Tree," "The Indian Hunter," "That Old Gang of Mine," etc. He championed social causes like abolition (this item), reform of mental asylums and temperance. This song celebrates the hypocrisy of the English who banned slavery in 1834, but continued the slave trade from Africa to the Americas (here, Cuba). The song reports two schooners flying the Union Jack and carrying a load of slaves chained below decks. When an English Man of War accosts them to search for contraband slaves, the shipmasters plan to throw the slaves overboard rather than sail without the Union Jack flying. The song, with an English publisher, appears to date from the late 1830's to 1840. It is magnificently illustrated on the front cover with wood engravings of the ships, their departure from what appears to be Land's End in Cornwall, a scene from America, pictures of the demeaning of slaves and a slave auction, a pianist at work as the ships are in port and a view of Niagara Falls with rainbows in the mist. All this is surmounted with a comic view of a Black face surmounting the publisher's label. Lacks a section of the inner margin of first page at foot, 1/2" x 6", without loss of text. Mild abrasion with a short tear involving musical instruction preceding the first bar. Else, Very Good. Ewen, Pop.Am.Comp., pp.148–50. Appleton's Cycl. Am. Biog.
Price: $350.00

9678
Wood, George.- Peter Schlemihl in America. Philadelphia. Carey and Hart. 1848. 495 pp. + 4 pp. publisher's ads. 8vo. Brown buckram with black leather label on spine titled in gilt. First Edition. George Wood (1799–1870), born in Massachusetts, grew up near Washington where he worked from 1819 to about 1845 for the government, ultimately heading the navigation division of the Treasury Department. In addition to his novels, he contributed to the Knickerbocker Magazine and other periodicals. This, Wood's first novel, is based on a famous German story by von Chamisso (1824), but Wood relates it to important currents in American and Continental philosophy, especially Transcendentalism and Fourierism. The appendix expands on these considerations, with extended articles on Emerson, Brownson, Channing, Fourier et al. The author seems troubled by the conflicts between Unitarianism and Transcendentalism, perhaps viewing Emerson as an atheist (despite his denials) and considering Fourier's ideas on female independence and equality as lies and licentious behavior. Wear to head and tail of spine. Leather label scratched. Mild foxing and mild browning of page edges. Else, Very Good. Sabin. Wright I, 2753. Appleton's Cycl. Am. Biog.
Price: $145.00

7737
Cram, George F.- 1886-7 Printed Color Map of Indian Territory [currently, Oklahoma]. Chicago. Geoge F. Cram Co., Gasked's Atlas of the West. 1886–7 1 p. 12" x 16" frame opening. Matted (Acid Free Mat) and framed. First Edition. A fascinating map of what was later to become Oklahoma in the latter part of the19th C., showing boundaries of Indian Reservations and Nations, towns, mountains, rivers, creeks and routes of the various railroads. A wax-engraved color map by the noted map maker of the 19th–20th centuries, George F. Crum. Interestingly, it charts the longitude west of Washington as well as west of Greenwich. Minorstain in left lower corner. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $135.00

7979
Bill, Henry.- View of San Francisco. 1854. New York. Henry Bill. 1854? 1 p. 13" x 21" in mat. Matted. First Edition. From "History of the World" by Henry Bill. Colored view (Original Color) of San Francisco with important points numbered and index below. Entire map view surrounded by light orange border. An inconsistency in the Connecticut copyright notice by Henry Bill, as the date appears to be hand-corrected to 1852 at some early stage, possibly at engraving or lithography. Creases from former folding within text of book. In the margins are hand-written inked numbers and carets indicating locations of correspondingly numbered pointsof interest as designated in the index. Small faint stains in lower left margin, not involving the image.
Price: $345.00

9453
L. M. N.- In Colonial Days. A Taleof Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Philadelphia. American Baptist Publication Society. 1886. 413 pp. Illustrated with full-page plates and one map. 8vo. Illustrated brown and gilt publisher's cloth with black lettering and illustration. A.e.g. Decorative end papers. First Edition. A Baptist novelistic narrative with much on Rhode Island College (Brown University), John Brown and President Manning. Good illustrations of University Hall, The Baptist Meeting House, etc. Wear at ends and edges of spine. Spotting of cover. Minor foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

9484
Anonymous.- Bemjamin Banneker, the Negro Astronomer. In The Atlantic Monthly, A Magazine of Literature, Art and Politics. No. LXIII. Vol. XI, January 1863, pp.79-84. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1863. 8vo. Disbound. First Edition. A single monthly issue of The Atlantic Monthly, probably disbound from a bound volume with an important articleon the great Maryland Black, 18th century astronomer, Benjamin Banneker, much admiredby Thomas Jefferson and by Condorcet. It addresses the Civil War, then goingon, and cites Banneker in evidence of the Black man's potential. Largely self-taught, Banneker became interested in clocks and then in astronomy. He compiled the first of his many almanacs with a complete ephemeris for 1792, noticed even by Rittenhouse. Banneker sent a copy to Jefferson, then Secretary of State to George Washington. Jefferson congratulated Banneker, taking note of the equal intelligence of Blacks to Whites, blaming the apparent differences on the social degredation forced by slavery on the Black. Banneker helped draw the lines of the District of Columbia, observed that the speed of sound was greater than that of a bullet and made observations on locusts and bees. He was buried in an unmarked grave. Alsopresent in this issue is a long abolitionist statement by Harriet Beecher Stowe (pp.120–133), "A Reply to the Address ot the Women of England" to British women, asking for their support to the Union cause in pursuit of the abolition of slavery and decrying the disappearance of these sentiments and voices for emancipation among British women. Also present are the first printings of Hawthorne's "Recollections of a Gifted Woman," Longfellow's "The Legend of Rabbi Ben Levi," and poems by Whittier and by Lowell. a very rich issue. Lacks covers. Else, Very Good. West and Lomazow, p. 19
Price: $75.00

9490
Goodwin, C. C.- The Mormon Situation. In Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 63, No. 377. October, 1881, pp. 756–763. New York. Harper & Brothers. 1881 pp. 642–800 (whole issue) + 12 pp. publisher's ads at rear. Illustrated Issue. 8vo. Pink printed and illustrated wraps. First Edition. An extensive diatribe against the Mormons and especially Brigham Young. The degradation of women by the church and its leaders is a major cause of the derogation of the Mormons. Brigham Young is labeled a hypocrite, an abuser of women and children and an inciter of murder. Polygamy is vociferously decried. To prove his argument, the author quotes from church authorities within his acquaintance. Mild soiling. Chips at edges without loss. Moisture staining internally without secondary effects. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

9372
9372 A Citizen (pseudonym).- To The Freemen of the State of Rhode-Island, &c., &c. Warwick, RI. N.P. 1817. 14 pp. 8vo. Self wrapppers. Stab-sewn. First Edition. Bartlett,, p.7 A pamphlet laying out the isues in the political campaign for Governor of Rhode Island between then Governor William Jones and Nehemiah R. Knight. Jones is supported because he protected the citizens of Rhode Island from the conscription of the militia in the War of 1812. The arguments are Rhode Island's continuing support of unbridled states rights over federalism, dating from their reluctance to adopt the US Constitution, through the twentieth century. The author adopts an anti-tax stand, when the taxes are to support Federal activities, like a standing army and navy. He is vitriolic in criticism of John Adams, much milder toward James Madison. Opposed to a national bank, the author is similarly disposed toward a Federal department of justice. Taxation, he claims, is a restriction of freedom, even enslavement. Knight is called the servant of the tax-gatherers of the Central Government. Small water stain on lowermost portion. mild offsetting. Pages untrimmed and uncut. Else, Very Good +.
Price: $110.00

9067
Anthony, Henry B.- [Pamphlet]. Defense of Rhode Island, Her Institutions, and Her Right to Her Representatives in Congress. Speech of Hon. Henry B. Anthony, of Rhode Island, in the Senate of the United States, February, 1881. Washington, DC. [US Government Printing Office] 1881. 35 pp. 8vo. Printed purple paper wraps. First Edition. Henry B. Anthony was a prominent native and citizen of Rhode Island, a graduate of Brown University in 1833, and US Senator. The state had a long history of restriction of suffrage based on ownership of property, a principle attacked in the failed Dorr Rebellion of 1842 which tried to enlarge the base of suffrage. Again in 1881, other states and many citizens of Rhode Island attacked the limited suffrage. In Congress motions were made to lessen Rhode Island's representation in the House. Henry B. Anthony, in this long speech, attacks his attackers and defends Rhode Island's historical precedent. In his arguments he uses time honored Rhode Island principles: Rhode Island is peculiar and is entitled to its peculiarities, no matter how unjust. For critics from within Rhode Island, he announces that most of them came to Rhode Island uninvited and there is noone restraining their departure ( "Love it or leave it!"). For the rest of the country, it is not their business who votes in Rhode Island. He cites many historical precedents and present day ideas and facts to support his arguments. The issue is clearly a continuation in the issues of the Dorr War, not to be resolved until the passage of more nearly universal suffrage. The hostility to outside influences and opinions and the demand for the respect for its peculiarities, especially constitutional and political, have not you been abandoned, even into this new millenium.Signed in stamp on front end paper: "Compliments oif H. B. Anthony." Wraps faded. Few pages (lower corner) dog-eared. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

9081
Bancroft, George.- Memorial Address on the Life and Character of Abraham Lincoln, Delivered, at the Request of Both Houses of the Congress of America, before them, in the House of representatives at washington, on the 12th of February, 1866. Washington, DC. Government Printing Office. 1866. 69 pp. 8vo. Brown publisher's cloth with gilt titling and decoration on front cover. First Edition. Frontispiece portrait of Lincoln, engraved by the Treasury Department Monaghan 841. BAL 673D An intellectual hisory of attitudes toward slavery in America and Lincoln's rise from his humble development to his role in eliminating this institution. A memorial address delivered by Bancroft to both houses of Congress on Lincoln's birthday in 1866. The delivery of an address had been offered first to Edwin M. Stanton, but he had declined and Bancroft was then invited to deliver the memorial. This was the principal address before Congress, President Andrew Johnson, Gen. Grant, the Chief Justice and Foreign Ministers.The appendix is a journal of the funeral exercises in Congress. Misprint mid-page, under dividing mark, on p.60 in date of current exercises [1865, for 1866]. Wear at edges, endsof spine and at corners. Foxing. Owner's signature on front free end paper:"Edward P. Spooner, Rochester, Mass. From Y. G. Elliot, June 21st, 1866." Else, Very Good.
Price: $95.00

9240
Bartlett, W. H..- The Pilgrim Fathers; or, The Founders of New England in the Reign of James the First. London. Arthur Hall, Virtue & Co. 1854. 240 pp. Royal 8vo. Disbound. Marbled end papers and page ends. Second Edition, Enlarged. Illustrated with 28 engravings on steel (vignettes) and 31 woodcuts. One of W. H. Bartlett's great works. He traces the history of the Pilgrims in the 17th century, in text and in illustration, from Leyden, Holland, through Boston, England, to the Massachusetts Bay Colony up through King Philip's War. All is enhanced by his magnificent engravings on steel, here vignetted. A fine work by one of the 19th century's greatest engravers-illustrators and travelers. Lacks covers and spine. Small water stain at lower corner of a few preliminary pages. Plates show slight offsetting onto tissue guards but no foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $200.00

9226
Bingham, Caleb.- The Young Lady's Accidence: or, a Short and Easy Introduction to English Grammar. Designed, Principally, for the Use of Young Learners, More Especially Those of the Fair Sex, Though Proper for Either. Boston. Printed by Manning & Loring for David West. 1799. 60 pp. Small 12mo in 6's. Tan calf spine on contemporary wooden boards covered in blue paper. Eleventh Edition. Evans 35209. A very good copy of Caleb Bingham's grammar for young people. Bingham's works, providing instruction to the youth in grammar, letter writing, oratory and literature, were very popular and each went through many editions. The first edition of this work (Evans 18934) was in 1785. Lacks front free end paper.Paper on boards worn through at edges. Short tear in lower gutter of page3/4 without loss of text. Foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $275.00

9244
[Bourne, George].- Picture of Slavery in the United States of America. Middletown, CT. Edwin Hunt. 1834. 228 pp. 12mo in 6's. Brown cloth covered boards. First Edition. Illustrated with 11 wood engravings. DAB, Appleton's Cycl. Am. Biog. Am. Imprints 23518. Sabin 6921. LCP/HSP 1414. A strongly worded diatribe against slavery by a noted abolitionist clergyman. Dedicated to members of the Anti-Slavery Societies and like-minded Americans. The history of opposition to slavery by religious and civil authorities (many of whom are quoted explicitly) is reviewed and both the churches and governments are urged to ban this heinous abuse of mankind. The illustrations are vitriolic, but accurate in portraying frequent abuses of slaves by slave holders. The title page includes a verse from Cowper. Interestingly, the author reviews the damaging effects of slavery on the slave holder. The last appendix is a detailed report of the Declaration of the Anti Slavery Convention of 1833, held in Philadelphia, with a list of the signatory delegates who include the author. Bourne (1780–1845) had "issued one of the first calls in the United States for immediate emancipation (1816). He was bitterly persecuted and charged by a Presbyterian council with heresy" (M & S, Cat. 65, #99.). Somewhat intemperate and, paradoxically opposed to women's rights, Bourne was a strong influence on William Lloyd Garrison. A remarkable document. Lacks most of spine. Boards detached. Shaken. Foxed. Small portion at tail of front free end paper lacking. Owner's signatures and tape marks on front free end paper. Overall Poor , but, except for foxing, text and illustrations are Good+.
Price: $175.00

9278
Campbell, Thomas.- Gertrude of Wyoming, and Other Poems. London. Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green. 1825 160 pp. 12mo. Full polished green calf with decorative rulings in gilt and in the blind. Marbled endpapers. Gilt decorations on edges and dentelles. T.e.g. Ninth Edition. Frontispiece, title page and textual illustrations drawn by R. Westall and engraved by C. Heath CBEL III, 183. Carroll Wilson !, 355. Sabin 10268 Two title pages. the first dated 1822, engraved and illustrated, the second a printed cancel title dated 1825. In this, the major work by Campbell (1777–1844) relating to America, he tells the story of a 1778 massacre of the settlement in Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, by a band of Indians led by a ferocious half breed . Among the victims was the woman Gertrude. The poem ends on the eve of revenge and retribution. Besides the helpful footnotes are longer textual, historical notes and extracts from travel books dealing with America, but especially the Lewis and Clark diaries, Wild's 'Travels in North America," and Jefferson's 'Notes on Virginia." The latter includes the narrative of a Virgina massacre of Indians in 1774, which served as a prototype for aspects of Gertrude of Wyoming. Among the other poems, for which Campbell is better known in England, are HohenlindenBattle of the Baltic, Lines on the Grave of a Suicide, Ode to the Memory of Burns, etc. Disbound, but all of binding present with front cover separated. Can be readily restored to a very attractive volume.Wear at edges of covers and spine. Owner's signature on title page. Else, Vey Good.
Price: $150.00

9127
Cobbett, William.- Advice to Young Men, and (Incidentally) to Young Women, in the Middle and Higher Ranks of Life. In a Series of Letters Addressed to a Youth, a Bachelor, a Lover, a Husband, a Father, a Citizen or a Subject. London. William Cobbett. 1829. Unpaginated. 12mo. One quarter calf and marbled boards and end papers.. Red leather spine label with gilt titling. T.e.g. First Edition. Pearl 171. Gaines 89a, 89b (for American issues, 1830–3). Osborne. Bookplate of John Bolton.William Cobbett (1763–1835) was a politicaljournalist, ever polemical and controversial, both in England and America, where he traveled extensively at two periods. Many critics consider this his best writing. It was originally issed in fourteen monthly parts and in book edition in 1830 (here noted as 1829). A work with charm and warmth, it is an apotheosis of family life. In this presentation, Cobbett's prose lacks the rancor and criticism of his other writings, but is rather naive and unaffected with a learning-centered family life, an extension in the family of schooling, which, in its more formal institutions was so austere and grim in Cobbett's time. Cobbett commends his mode of life to others. Wear at edges of spine and boards. External cracks for 1" at head of spine. Wear at corners. Abrasion of boards. front hinge cracked with detachment of front end paper (present). Scattered mild foxing and browning. Else, Very Good.`
Price: $225.00

9242
Cobbett, William.- Cobbett's Weekly Political Register, Vol. 3d, No. 1, American, from Volume 32d, No. 1, English; Consisting Chiefly of Mr. Cobbett's Essays, Which Have Been Published in the Corresponding Number in England. Cancel Title: Cobbett's Political Register. Volume II. American, or Volume XXXIII. English. From May to October, 1817, Inclusive. New York. H. Cobbett. Printed by J. & J. Harper. 1817. 8vo. Half brown calf and blue marbled boards. First Edition. Gaines 71a. Cobbett's Weekly Register as well as a number of his Extra-Sheets and pamphlets bound together in their American versions, some with title pages. Published in New York by William Cobbett's nephew, Henry Cobbett, and through an early Harper Brothers imprint. William Cobbett (1763–1835), a pamphleteer of verbal and stylistic skill, lived in America from 1793 to 1800. He was a vocal and respected critic of America, but he was successfully sued for a libel of Dr. Benjamin Rush for the latter's therapy of yellow fever by blood-letting. He supported America in the War of 1812 and moved from America to England and back, several times, usually in advance of the authorities in consequence of his sharp-tongued pamphlets, of which these are examples. Foxed. Spine ends worn. Front hinge cracked internally and starting externally. Board ends worn. Soiled. Else, Good.
Price: $200.00

9224
[Franklin, Sir John ]. Edited by D.W.B. of Washington, DC.- Thirty Years in the Arctic Regions: A Narrative of the Explorations and Adventures of Sir John Franklin. [Philadelphia &] Cincinnati, OH. John E. Potter & Co and United States Book and Bible Company. ND. [ca. 1859]. 480 pp.12mo. Deep blue publisher's cloth, embossed decoration in black on front cover, in blind on rear. Gilt titling on spine. A.e.g. Brown coated end papers. ?First Edition. Frontispiece portrait of Elisha Kent Kane, M.D., USN, in arctic dress. Engraved by John Sartain of Philadelphia from a portrait painted by J. B. Nandesforde. The original engraving appeared in the "New York Albion." Copyright by H. Dayton in 1859. Franklin, the great 19th century arctic explorer made three successful voyages to the region, from 1816 to 1825. His fourth voyage ended disastrously and mysteriously in 1845. Several expeditions were sent in search of Franklin, among them illustriously that by Elisha Kent Kane (1820–1857), who published his experiences with the two Grinnell expeditions (1850–55) in two volumes in 1856 and who was the first significant American Arctic explorer. In this volume, Franklin's own reports of his first three voyages are condensed by the editor to make them accessible to the general reader, but in Franklin's own words. The expeditions by others, in search of Franklin, are sketched also. An engrossing narrative. The book, itself undated, contains the copyrightdate in New York, a Cincinnati imprint on the title page, and the publisher printed on the cover is John E. Potter & Co., presumably in Philadelphia. Wear at ends of spine and corners bumped.. Gilding of page ends dulled. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

9355
Frothingham, Rev. O. B.- The Morality of the Riot. A Sermon at Ebbitt Hall, Sunday, July 19, 1863. New York. David G. Francis. 1863. 20 pp. 16mo. Printed paper wraps.Sewn. First Edition. DNB. Inscribed in ink on front cover: "To the N. Jersey Hist. Socy./ from S. Alofsen. Dec. 10.1863." in July, 1863, New York experienced the so-called Draft Riots, in opposition to the Civil War, to the abolitionist movement and to racial equality. The leaders were a species of Know-Nothings and disenfranchised. Politicians were attacked while Governor Seymour waffled, lynchings of Blacks took place, and men like Horace Greeley were attacked, their houses invaded, and gross civil unrest was the rule of the day. Factories were destroyed, some by the workers. This sermon attacks the rioters on many counts and presents a rationalist view of America, the inspiration of a true religious experience, economic salvation of America and its working poor through the Industrial Revolution, a form of Manifest Destiny as well as righteous indignation on a moral and religious basis. A true 19th century response to a noted period of civil unrest. Octavius Brooks Frothingham (1822–95) was a Unitarian, and later Independent, Minister, a Harvard graduate, radical in temperament but conservative in outlook. He moved to New Jersey and later to New York, where he often spoke at Ebbitt Hall. He was untraditional and strongly abolitionist. His cousin, Henry Adams, said his faith was skepticism. A founder of the Free Religious Association, his sermons were widely broadcast and reprinted. He retired because of ill health to Boston, where he wrote extensively. Ex libris with modest stamps. Front cover detached. Few small chips from edge of front cover.
Price: $75.00

9165
Green, Frances Harriet McDougall (or Williams, Mrs. Catherine R.) (pseud.: A Rhode Islander).- Might and Right. Providence. A. H. Stillwell. 1844. 324 pp. 12mo in 6's. Brown embossed publisher's cloth with gilt titling on spine. First Edition. Frontispiece Portrait of Thomas Wilson Dorr. Sabin 48898. Not in American Imprints or Bartlett. DAB re Authorship. A sympathetic review of the Dorrites and their political movement for democracy in Rhode Island; especially important for discussion of the constitutional issues of legislative authority as allegedly derived from King Charles's Charter of 1663. Along with Mowry's modern history, a cornerstone of Dorr Collections. Copy of Sylvester Chase, dated 1844. Mild wear at head and tail of spine. Corners worn and bumped. Foxing of preliminaries. Text tight and Very Good.
Price: $150.00

9187
Hazard, Samuel (Editor).- [Two Pamphlets]. (1). The Inaugural Address of William Henry Harrison and the Arrangements for his Inauguration. In United States Commercial and Statistical Register, Vol. IV, No. 10, pp. 145–160, March 10, 1841. (2). The Funeral Ceremonies of the President [Harrison] and Arrangements for the Interment of the Late President. In United States Commercial and Statistical Register, Vol. IV, No. 16, pp. 241–256, April 21, 1841. Philadelphia United States Commercial and Statistical Register. 1841. 16, 16 pp. 8vo. Disbound. First Edition. In his Inaugural Address, President Harrison addresses important issues of concern to the country then and now. Included are the power of the legislature, the danger of multiple terms for the President, the veto power, the danger in control of the press, the stability of the currency and the dangers of metallism, States' rights, forebearance of differences among the States (?slavery), excessive partisanship and his base in the Christian faith. The inaugural procession is specified. Other articles in this issue include Van Buren's farewell to the diplomatic corps, the price of specie and rates of foreign exchange during 1839, a comparison of the costs, maintenance and persistence of paper and metal money, and the announcement of President Harrison's Cabinet appointments. In the second pamphlet, inaddition tothe program of the funeral ceremonies and order of march for the interment procession for the deceased President Harrison, there is a report ofthe ceremony on the taking of office of the President by Vice President Tyler. Moreover, there is a detailed report on the assets and liabilities of the Bank of the United States and letters to and from various Biddles regarding liabilities of the Bank to them fore the brokering of cotton, etc. Important issues of both pamphlets. Foxed. Else, Very Good.
Price: $325.00

9055
Howland, Mrs. E[sther] A[llen].- The New England Economical Housekeeper and Family Receipt Book. Worcester. S[outhworth] A[llen] Howland. 1846. 108 pp. 12mo in 6's. Brown cloth spine and blue printed paper covered boards.Bookseller's pictorial ad on rear cover. Stereotype Edition (copyright 1845) Elaborate frontispiece with numerous printer's devices. Lincoln-Lowenstein 391. The second edition, stereotyped, of a very popular home receipt book of the mid -19th Century, subsequently much reprinted. Given the household use of this book and the general disrepair of the usually encountered copy, this is a very good item with all intact. One copy noted by Lowenstein. Wear at edges of boards. Soiling of covers. Hinges cracked internally. Foxing. Overall, Very Good for a cookbook of this vintage with household use.
Price: $175.00

8606
Junius (pseud.).- The Letters of Junius. From the Latest London Edition. In Two Volumes (Vol. II only). New York. Henry Durell. 1821. 215 pp. 8vo. Blue paper covered board. Printed paper label on spine. First American Edition. Junius was an English political writer, whose letters to the London "Public Advertiser" from January 1769 to January 1772 attacked King George III and his ministerrs, mostly about the controversy over John Wilkes. Wilkes, a journalist, entered parliament in 1757, but continued to attack the King in his periodical, the North Briton. He was expelled from Parliament in 1764 and imprisoned, but was repeatedly reelected, finally being allowed to be seated in 1774. Wilkes defended the cause of liberty for the American colonies. Junius' Letters were of great interest to Benjamin Waterhouse, the maverick Newport-born, London- and Leyden-educated physician and patriot, the first Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physick, recruited to the faculty of the new medical school at Harvard by John Warren. Waterhouse was the first American champion of Jenner's vaccination for smallpox, even persuading Jefferson to vaccinate his family and household, but his difficult personality led to controversy and isolation. He spent his last days editing an edition of Junius' letters, attributing them to Lord Chatham (William Pitt). According to Francesco Cordasco, Junius was Laughton Macleane, a Regimental Surgeon in the French and Indian War and later secretary to Lord Shelburne. Bookplate of Harry S. Hamburger, dated 1932, on front pastedown. Covers faded and stained. Chips missing from paper spine. Cracks in Paper label, but all present. Browning and foxing. Fair.
Price: $75.00

9225
[Members of the Senate and of the House of Representatives of the United States].- Obituary Addresses on the Occasion of the Death of the Hon. Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts, Secretary of State for the United States Delivered in the Senate and in the House of Representatives of the United States, Fourteenth and Fifteenth December, 1852. Washington,DC. Robert Armstrong. 1953. 86 pp. 8vo. Embossed brown publisher's cloth with illustration of Webster's memorial embossed in gilt on both covers. T.e.g. First Edition. Frontispiece portrait of Daniel Webster, engraved by W. H. Dougal from a dagurreotypy by Whipple. Appreciations of Daniel Webster from his colleagues in the Congress of the United States, after his death. The singularity of Webster's interests and actions was noted as he was placed in the pantheon of America's greatest: Washington, Jackson, Clay and others. Webster (1782-1852) was a lawyer, born i n New Hampshire. He was famous for his oratory and likened to Pitt and Burke. He served in the US House of Representatives from 1812 and the Senate from1827, then as Secretary of State under Harriso n and Tyler (1841-45 and1850-52). Slight wear at head of spine. Water stain at top edges. Offsetting of frontispiece onto title page. Foxing. Else, Very Good+.
Price: $48.00

9170
New-York State Society of the Cincinnati.- The Institution of the Society of the Cincinnati, Formed by the Officers of the American Army of the Revolution, for the Laudable Purposes Therein Mentioned, at the Cantonment on the Banks of the Hudson River, May, 1783; Together with Some of the Proceedings of the General Society, and of the New-York state Society; also, a List of the Officers and Members of the New-York State Society, from Its Organization to the Year 1851. New York. New-York State Society of the Cincinnati. 1851. 120 pp. 8vo, in 4's. Purple pebbled cloth. Disbound. First Edition. The Society of the Cincinnati, of which George Washington was a proud and distinguished member, and whose arms decorated Washington's dinner service of Chinese manufacture, was formed by officers in the Army of the Revolution 1n 1783. The Society was formed, according to Alexander Hamilton, on friendship and patriotism. Later, Naval and Marine officers were admitted. Much discussion here concerns election of new members with regard for heredity, primogeniture and merit. Much rhetoric on "The American Empire" is quoted from a 1786 letter from Alexander Hamilton, calling for limitations in membership. Cbituaries are noted for Aaron Burr, De Witt Clinton, Philip Van Cortland, Henry Beekman Livingston, an assortment of Varicks, Fish, Trumbull, Bleeker, etc. The lists of original members, hereditary members and honorary members are quite interesting. Covers detached. Spine torn; lacks lower half. Foxing and browning of edges. Else, Very Good.
Price: $110.00

`9277
Newhall, Isaac.- Letters on Junius, Addressed to John Pickering, Esq. Showing That the Author of That Celebrated Work Was Earl Temple. Boston. Hilliard, Gray, Little, and Wilkins. 1831. 276 pp. 12mo. Cloth spine with printed paper label. Paper covered boards. Pages untrimmed. First Edition. Frontispiece portrait engraving of Earl Temple. From internal evidence, Newhall argues that the author of the Letters of Junius was Earl Temple, brother of the author of the notorious (to Americans) British Stamp Act. Junius was an English political writer, whose letters to the London "Public Advertiser" from January 1769 to January 1772 attacked King George III and his ministerrs, mostly about the controversy over John Wilkes. Wilkes, a journalist, entered parliament in 1757, but continued to attack the King in his periodical, the North Briton. He was expelled from Parliament in 1764 and imprisoned, but was repeatedly reelected, finally being allowed to be seated in 1774. Wilkes defended the cause of liberty for the American colonies. Junius' Letters were of great interest to Benjamin Waterhouse, the maverick Newport-born, London- and Leyden-educated physician and patriot, the first Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physick, recruited to the faculty of the new medical school at Harvard by John Warren. Waterhouse was the first American champion of Jenner's vaccination for smallpox, even persuading Jefferson to vaccinate his family and household, but his difficult personality led to controversy and isolation. He spent his last days editing an edition of Junius' letters, attributing them to Lord Chatham (William Pitt). This volume argues diifferently. According to Francesco Cordasco, Junius was Laughton Macleane, a Regimental Surgeon in the French and Indian War and later secretary to Lord Shelburne. Ex libris with bookplate and 2 stamps.Owner's signature onfront free end paper: "H.P. Hood's Book / 1840." Half of rear free end paper missing. Errata slip pasted to last page. Foxed. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

9166
One of 'Em. - The Wide-Awake Gift: A Know-Nothing Token for 1855. "Put None but Americans on Guard To-Night." New York. J. C. Derby. 1855. 312 pp. 12mo. Brown publisher's cloth embossed and decorated with gilt illustration of George Washington on front cover and gilt illustrated and lettered spine. First Edition. Not illustrated. The Know-Nothing movement of the 1840-1850's was a xenophobic, anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant (especially Irish Catholics fleeing the famine in Ireland), jingoistic movement founded by "native-born" Americans and achieving some temporary political success. They adopted George Washington, Patrick Henry and others as their symbols and published this volume of patriotic Americana to stir their troops in the battle to defend their form of an America for Americans. Owner's signature on front free fly leaf: Merry (?) Taylor.Spine ends and corners slightly bumped and worn. Minimal foxing and browning. Spine faded and edge of front cover sunned. Else, Very Good.
Price: $90.00

9213
Perrault, Major P. H., U. S.Topographic Engineer.- [Survey Map]. Survey of a Valley and Ponds Auxiliary to a Contemplated Canal between Buzzards & Barnstable Bays, State of Massachusetts and Town of Sandwich. 1825. N.P. U. S. Topographic Survey. 1825. 1 p .8 1/2" x 16 1/4" Unbound (possibly disbound) and unmounted. Printed on tissue paper. First Edition. Drawn by Lt. W. B. Thompson, etched by Lt. John Farley. First Edition. A topographic survey for the proposed Cape Cod Canal, conducted in 1825 by Frederick Searle of the 4th Artillery, J. W. A. Smith of the 1st Artillery and Lt. W. B. Thompson of the 5th Infantry. The canal was not to be built for over 100 years. The valley and ponds through which the canal was to be built are beautifully engraved with the North-South meridian, both magnetic and true, indicated as well as an engraved scale of distance. The sides and bottom are surrounded by a decorative border and the lettering engraved with attractive flourishes. Three vertical folds (?originally a folding map in a volume). Top edge sharply cut off across width. Short separation at upper edge of left-most fold. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $175.00

9360
Root, George F.- Just after the Battle. Song and Chorus by Geo. F. Root. Chicago. Root & Cady. 1863. 5 pp. + publisher's ads on verso of both covers. Fo. Illustrated, heavily engraved front cover. Disbound and stab-sewn. First Edition. Cover engraving by Copcutt-Williams. Illustrations of Civil War scenes and popular song titles by George F. Root. Plate # 379-3. Fisher, 150 Yrs. Music Publ. US, pp. 59, 60, 129, 132. Pre-fire Chicago imprint of Civil War music. A wounded soldier lies in pain thinking of his mother, but optimistic of his survival. Root & Cady, the pioneer music publisher of Chicago, was founded in 1858, became Geo. F. Root & Sons after the fire in 1871 and the catalogue then sold to John Church in 1873. George Root, originally from Boston where he was an active composer of anthems, choruses and sacred music, had joined Root & Cady in 1859. Wear at edges. Foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

9050
Scott, R. O.- The New Skedaddle. Song and Chorus. Words & Music by R. O. Scott. Chicago. Root & Cady. 1862. 5 pp. Fo. Disbound sheet music. Printed and decorated paper covers. First Edition. 150 Yrs. Music Publishing in US, pp. 129, 132. Not in Fuld, Dichter's Handbook,or Crawford's Civil War Songbook. A pre-fire Chicago imprint of a slave song in dialect. There is the contrast between the helplessness of Jeff Davis and the optimism of the darkeys who keep the North Star before them as they travel, with the sounds and rhythm of skedaddle taken up by the trains amd paddle boats.[E. T.] Root & [C. M.] Cady was established in 1858 and lasted till 1872, after the Chicago Fire under the guidance of George F. Root, a brother of the founding Root, and the composer of enormously popular Civil War songs, like "The Battle Cry of Freedom," "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the Boys Are Marching," etc. Foxing. Browning of edges. Wear at head of fold. Dealer's stamp at foot of front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $100.00

9064
[Society of Friends].- Two Volumes Bound Together: I. Memorials of Deceased Friends, of the New England Yearly Meeting. Published by The Meeting for Sufferings. 1841; II. The Testimony of the Society of Friends, on the Continent of America. Providence; Philadelphia. Knowles & Vose; [Joseph Rakestraw for theSociety of Friends]. 1841; 1830. 96, 36 pp. 8vo. Contemporary purple publisher's cloth. First Edition. Sabin 86070. AI 1508 (The Testimony) The first volume attempts to record for Quaker posterity the character and religious devotion to Quaker ideals (especially simplicity, the avoidance of idols and ikons and the rejection of war and oaths) of deceased members of the New England Yearly Meeting. Brief biographies are provided by the Meeting for Sufferings. The second volume takes note of a developing schism in the Society of Friends, with the introduction of speculative opinions by "superficial professors of spiritual religion" and a"refined spirituality." This led to a rejection of orthodox Truth and to dissension with the introduction of prejudice and alienation. The Testimony is a calling together of all branches of the Society in affirmation of the older Truth and rejection of the newly introduced notions of superficial spirituality. Doctrinal beliefs are affirmed, include the resistance to war and the imposition of oaths, avoidance of public feasts and amusements, the abstinence from spirituous liquors and an abhorrence of slavery, its oppression and degradation of fellow-men entitled to freedom, a right to liberty and property. The Testimony provides a ringing endorsement of the Quaker opposition to this "foul disgrace" and predicts accurately the serious difficulties and distress our country will endure in ridding us of this institution. Cloth faded, especially the spine. minor foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $165.00

9102
[Stereoscopic View].- The Army and Navy Monument, Boston Common. Dedicated to the Men of Boston Who Died in the Civil War. N.P. No Publisher. N.D. [ca. 1877]. 1 pp. 4" x 7". Card mounted stereoscopic photograph. First Edition. Darrah, p.14–15. Waldsmith, pp. 28–9. This stereoscopic card shows the famous Army and Navy Monument erected on Boston Common in 1877 to commemorate the men of Boston who died in the Civil War. The naked landscaping and residua of construction date the photograph from an early time. The monument was commemorated also in a volume from 1877 published by the Boston City Council, with photographs of the decorative sculpture adorning the monument. Commemorative plates and other memorabilia were issued. The monument was designed by the Boston sculptor, Martin Milmore. The crown is a bronze casting of an idealized America. Bronze reliefs adorn the four sides of the monument.The inscription was written by President Eliot of Harvard.The card can be dated from its color and design. The orange color with pink back and rounded corners of the mount date the card to after1873, The lack of curved format places the card before the latest 1870's, but the larger than conventional format places it before 1880. The photographer is unknown. A handwritten inscription on the pink reverse is labeled: "Soldier's Monument / Boston Common." Minor wear at edge of card. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $110.00

9101
[Stereoscopic View].- The Old Stone Mill. Newport, Rhode Island. York, PA. Crider & Brother. N.D. [ca. 1868–72]. 1 pp. 3 1/2" x 7". Card mounted stereoscopic photograph. First Edition. Darrah, p.14. Waldsmith, pp. 28–9. This stereoscopic card has a view of the famous stone mill of Newport, Rhode Island. The structure has had a an important career in the history of the State. It has, at times, been supposed to be a relic of a Norse settlement dating from the eleventh century, but this has not been verified and appears unlikely. It has an early date and may be a construction by Native Americans or the early 17th century British settlers of Rhode Island. The stereograph itself is an advertising piece from a York, Pennsylvania bookstore and, as is typical, can be dated from its color and design. The yellow color of the mount dates the card in the range of 1862–1873, but the rounded corners indicate a post-1867 date. The lack of curved format places the card before 1872–1873.The high quality of the photograph suggests that it was possibly taken by J. A. Williams, who was active in Newport at the appropriate time. Minor soiling on rear of card. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $110.00

9184
Stow[e], Phineas.- Ocean Melodies, and Seamen's Companion: A Collection of Hymns and Music; for Use of Bethels, Chaplains of the Navy, and Private Devotion of Mariners. Boston. Phineas Stow[e]. 1851. 176 pp. 16mo. Green cloth spine and green patterned paper covered boards. Third Edition. NUC #NS 0981990 Phineas Stowe (1812–1868) was pastor of the Boston Baptist Bethel Society. He edited several volumes of music, generally for seamen audiences. This volume, of which the first edition was published in 1849, contains a service for burial at sea. It includes melodies expurgated by the author by removal of the terms "Jack" and "Tar" considered by the author to be offensive to seamen. The author includes an index of first lines, roughly alphabetized, but does not include an index of titles "for want of room." Quite scarce with only two copies noted by NUC, at the Newberry Library and at Oberlin. Covers abraded. Corners worn. Foxed. Shaken. Else, Good.
Price: $155.00

9193
Stowe, Harriet Beecher.- Sojourner Truth, The Libyan Sybil. In The Atlantic Monthly. A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics. Volume XI, January–June, 1863, pp. 473–481. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1863. 788 pp.8vo. Bound volume. Half brown calf with brown pebbled cloth covered boards and gilt titling on spine. First Edition. Anecdotes of the meeting of Harriet Beecher Stowe and the great American black spokeswoman, Sojourner Truth. Other articles include a second by Harriet Beecher Stowe on slavery, M. D. Conway on "Benjamin Banneker, the Negro Astronomer," four by Louis Agassiz, three by Nathaniel Hawthorne, one each by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Francis Wayland and L. Maria Child. Poems by Whittier, Emerson, Julia Ward Howe, Lowell and Longfellow. Binder's tag, from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on front pastedown. A very rich volume. Spine faded. Wear at ends and edges of spine with front hinge starting. Wear at corners. Ex libris (library blind stamp on title page and other stamp on front end papers), but owner's signature on end paper and title page: "J. S. Tripp / Sauk City Wis." Else, Very Good.
Price: $65.00

9216
Stuart, I[saac] W[illiam]- Life of Captain Nathan Hale, the Martyr Spy of the American Revolution. Hartford. F. A. Brown. 1856. 271 pp. + 12 pp. book reviews. 12mo in 6's. Blue publisher's cloth, embossed in the blind with gilt device on front cover and gilt illustration and titling on spine. A.e.g. Light blue end papers. Second Edition, Enlarged and Improved. Illustrated with lithographs by E. B. & E. C. Kellogg of drawings by Henry Bryant, Joseph Ropes and W. M. B. Hartley, and with wood engravings. Copyright 1855. The life and career of Nathan Hale, young teacher, intellect, great patriot, American spy and martyr to American freedom. Nicely illustrated with early Kellogg lithographs. Having infiltrated the British camp on orders from General Washington, Hale was captured with his notes in Latin. Executed after a quick trial, his last words are reported here, as on his monument erected in 1844, to have been: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Wear on edges of spine. soiling of spine. Foxed. One signature shaken.. Gilt dulled. Owner's label on front pastedown. Label removed from front and rear free end papers. Else, Good+.
Price: $195.00

9112
Tanner, Mrs. Sarah Wilcox.- [Broadside]. Farewell. West Greenwich, RI. N.P. 1 p. 3 1/4" x 4 5/8" Unbound. First Edition. A small broadside poem by Mrs. Tanner from 1868. She bids a warm adieu to her home, her parents and her friends. The occasion is unknown, but the sentiment is spare, yet warm and optimistic. Tucked in is a clipped ad, possibly turn of the century, for The Lincoln Fountain Pen, illustrated, patented in 1897 and offered by Frazer & Geyer Co. of New York. Very Good.
Price: $55.00

9065
Taylor, Mrs. Jane.- Know Thyself! Primary Lessons in Physiology for Children (First Cancel Title Page). [Wouldst Know Thyself, Or, The Outlines of Human Physiology : Designed for the Youth of Both Sexes. Illustrated with Numerous Anatomical Engravings (Cover)]. New York. George F. Cooledge & Brother. 1858. 65 pp. + 2pp. publisher's ads. Brown linen spine and yellow printed paper covered boards. New Edition, Revised and Enlarged. Profusely illustrated. Rosenbach, Early Am. Child. Bks., #777, #787. A series of lessons on anatomy and physiology for children. Numerous wood engravings to illustrate important points about posture, sensory anatomy, the evils of spirituous liquors, etc. Two forms of cancel title page inserted in text, possibly in process of enlargement. Publisher's ads on rear cover. Very decorative type faces on front cover. Jane Taylor was the author of several children's books in the early-mid 19th century. Two are listed by Rosenbach (with cut-off date of 1836, this title not included). Both pastedowns now non-adherent. Front pastedown was another form of title page. Covers soiled in front and rear with chipping at edges without loss of text. Minimal foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $90.00

9274
Thatcher, B[enjamin] B[ussey].- Indian Biography: or, An Historical Account of Those Individuals Who Have Been Distinguished among the North American Natives as Orators, Warriors, Statesmen, and Other Remarkable Characters. Two Volumes. New York. J. & J. Harper. 1840, 1834. 324, 320 pp. + 4 pp. publisher's ads. 12mo. in 6's. Printed paper covered boards and spine. Stereotype Edition. Volume I from later edition, Volume II from the fourth edition. First edition was in 1832, but reprinted many times. Frontispiece engraving of Red Jacket (engraved by Gimber & Dick after a painting by R. W. Weir) in Vol. I. Harper's Family Library. No. XLV and No. XLVI. Sabin 95216. AI 14970 & 40-6520. DAB. A married set of an important early 19th century book of admiration toward Native Americans. Both volumes have long been together, as noted from the ex libris written on the fly leaves. Thatcher (1809–40), a lawyer who preferred writing, was a strong supporter of the Colonization Society, struggling against Garrison and the other radical abolitionists. He was active philanthropically, especially for the blind and the Perkins Institution. He wrote the memoir of Phyllis Wheatley (1834) in support of his efforts for colonization. Volume II lacks paper covering of spine. Hinges cracked. Covers stained. Mild to moderate foxing. Labeled in ink script on end papers: "White Oak Library Co. No 9 and No 10." Else, Good to Very Good tight copies.
Price: $98.00

9214
[The Trustees of the Perkins Institution for the Blind].- [Pamphlet]. Proceedings of the Public Meeting on Behalf of the Printing Fund for the Blind, held at Tremont Temple, on Friday, April 1st, 1881. An Appeal for Light. Boston. Wright & Potter Printing Company. 1881. 34 pp.8vo. Purple Printed Paper Wraps. First Edition. Two engravings: of the printing press for the blind drawn by W. T. Oliver, and of Laura Bridgman teaching Oliver Caswell to read. With the library of the Perkins Institution containing in 1881 only 100 well-worn books (in contrast to the 386,000 in the Boston Public Library and 250.000 at Harvard), an appeal was launched in that year to raise funds for a library of raised letter books. A public meeting was held for this purpose with a blue-ribbon cast of speakers. Besides the illustrious trustees and directors, these include the Governor of Massachusetts, the Rev. Phillips Brooks, Rev. Edward Everett Hale, Julia Ward Howe (who was called from the audience), and many important divines of Boston. Students from the Perkins Institution performed readings and the meeting closed with an affecting reading by Laura Bridgman. Throughout the exercises there were numerous references to Dr. Samuel G. Howe, first Director of the Institution and champion of the interests and literacy of blind people. Regrettably only one fourth of the anticipated sum was raised, and it was hoped that this pamphlet might stimulate a more favorable donation. Corners and edges chipped. Cover faded. Rear cover detached. Else, Very Good.
Price: $155.00

9162
Turner, J. W.- A Nation Weeps. Dirge on the Death of Abraham Lincoln. Boston. Oliver Ditson & Co. 1865. 5 pp. Fo. Printed paper wraps decorated with black border. Disbound. First Edition. Plate 22690. Dichter's Handbook. Crawford's Civil War Songbook. Fisher, 150 Yrs. Mus. Publ. US, p.99. A mournful melody in honor of Abraham Lincoln, for voice and piano. Four part harmony for the Chorus. Not in Dichter, which records at least 10 mourning songs in honor of Lincoln; nor in Crawford. Quite scarce. The date of publication is confirmed by the list of associate publishers. Cover foxed and stained. Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

9068
U.S. Senate Documents.- [Pamphlets] Two Documents of the U.S. Senate, 26th Congress, 2d Session. #193. Documents Relating to the Claim of the Heirs of Robert Fulton. January 26, 1841. To Accompany Bill S.225. #194. In the Senate of the United States. March 10, 1840. Reprinted January 26, 1841. Report to Accompany Bill S. No. 225. Report of The Committee of Claims, to Whom Were Referred the Memorial of the Heirs of Robert Fulton, and the Accompanying Papers. [Washington, DC]. [US Government Printing Office] 1841. 21, 19 pp. 8vo. Disbound. First Edition. In 1807, Robert Fulton demonstrated a practical steamboat and received contracts for developing a steamboat service on the Hudson River. In 1810, he was contracted by the US Government to develop a system of coastal defenses, including the torpedo, and investigate its utility. For this he was paid $5000. In 1814, during the war of 1812 with Britain, the US government asked him to develop steam-frigates for the transport of troops on the Mississippi River to and from New Orleans. Fulton worked assiduously on this project, at no compensation and to his own debility. After an especially icy mid-winter voyage across the Hudson, on his duties, he contracted an illness which was fatal in 1815 and the US Government debts to him remained unpaid, despite successful suits by his heirs, until 1841. These documents and reports deal with the consideration of the extent of appropriate compensation to the heirs by the US Senate, as ordered by the courts. The Committee of Claims recommended a niggardly sum, despite the evidence presented here in the claims of the Family, the report of the Navy Department, the agreement between Fulton and Secretary of State James Monroe, etc. Congress had approved compensation and asked the Navy Department to help set the level in 1836, as confirmed here by signatures in type by James K. Polk, Speaker of the House, Martin Van Buren, Vice President and President of the Senate, and Andrew Jackson, President of the U.S. Congress eventually approved the sum of $100,000. Minimal browning at edges. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $250.00

9283
Upham, Charles Wentworth.- Life Explorations and Public Services of John Charles Fremont. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1856. 356 pp. 12mo. Illustrated with wood engravings, some signed by J. W. Orr or engraved by Richardson Cox. Frontispiece portrait of Fremont. Includes the portrait of Kit Carson, not present in all copies. Embossed green publisher's cloth with gilt titling on spine. First Edition. Field 1589. Hill, p. 302. Wagner-Camp 282. Sabin 25838. Flake 9259. A story of the exploits of Fremont, published in 1856, just as he became the first Republican Party candidate for the presidency. The timing suggests this may be a campaign biography, a still active tradition. Field calls for 12 illustrations, but this volume contains 13. Bookseller's label on front pastedown . Mild fading of spine. Gilt is very bright and cloth is very clean. Text block excellent with only a bit of foxing and offsetting. Overall, Very Good +.
Price: $150.00

9338
Webster, Noah, Jun.- An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking. Calculated to Improve the Minds and Refine the Taste of Youth. And Also to Instruct Them in the Geography, History, and Politics of the United States. To Which Are Prefixed, Rules of Elocution, and Directions for Expressing the Principal Passions of the Mind. Being the Third Part of a Grammatical Institute of the English Language. To Which Is Added, an Appendix, Containing Several New Dialogues. Boston. Isaiah Thomas and Ebenezer T. Andrews 1800. 240 pp. 12mo. in 6's. Contemporary calf spine and blue paper covered wooden boards with leather back straps. Twelfth Edition "with many corrections and improvements, by the author." Frontispiece portrait of Noah Webster applied to front pastedown. Evans 39037. Skeel & Carpenter 491. Sabin 102336 (for first separate issue). Copyright 1790 by Thomas and Andrews. The first publication of this volume was in 1787 by Young and M'Culloch (Skeel 452). The third part of Webster's magnum opus, of which the first part was his American Spelling Book, the second his Grammar. The frontispiece is a portrait of Noah Webster, done rather simply, and surmounted,as customary, by the Edition Number and date. Front hinge separated, but all is well held together by the two leather bands. Blue paper covers soiled and worn at edges revealing intact wooden boards. Lacks front free end paper, with frontispiece applied to front pastedown. Else, a Very Good copy in the edition of Isaiah Thomas.
Price: $250.00

9049
Work, Henry C.- Kingdom Coming! Song and Chorus by Henry C. Work. Chicago. Root & Cady. 1862. 5 pp. Fo. Disbound sheet music. Printed paper covers. First Edition. Fuld, p.349. Dichter's Handbook, 305. R. Crawford (Ed.), Civil War Songbook, pp. x, 145–148. 150 Yrs. Music Publishing in US, pp. 129, 132. R. Davison, Am. Sheet Mus. Ill., p.22. A pre-fire Chicago imprint of a slave song in dialect. Several references to Lincoln. A song of optimism as Southern forces begin to lose to Northern armies and flee their embattled residences. Ads for Steinway pianos on rear cover. Henry Clay Work was a native of Connecticut, a composer of Civil War and Temperance songs as well as an inventor of toys and machinery. He was the composer of the song most hated in the South, "Marching Through Georgia," in celebration of Sherman's triumphal march "from Atlanta to the Sea." [E. T.] Root & [C. M.] Cady was established in 1858 and lasted till 1872, after the Chicago Fire under the guidance of George F. Root, a brother of the founding Root, and the composer of enormously popular Civil War songs, like "The Battle Cry of Freedom," "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the Boys Are Marching," etc. This issue not illustrated in title, as are some other issues. Small closed tear in margin. brown offsetting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $150.00

8872
8872 "A Gentleman of New Hampshire."- A New Abridgement of Murray's English Grammar. With Alterations and Improvements. Walpole, NH. Isaiah Thomas. 1811. Americana Pages 54 pp.12mo in 6's. 5 1/4" x 3 1/4" Blue paper wraps. Sewn. First Edition. James G. Watts, Printer. DAB. Buckingham's Reminiscences, I, p. 244. AI 23472. Shipton, Isaiah Thomas An early imprint in the Walpole (NH) branch of the Isaiah Thomas publishing empire. The branch had been established in 1793 by Thomas with David Carlisle, one of Thomas's freed apprentices and a native of Walpole. This publication was likely issued by the son of Isaiah Thomas (the father having retired in 1802), generally labelled "Jnr.," but here the father's name is retained. As in most Thomas imprints, the typeface and quality of printing attain a high order of clarity and aesthetic sensibility. In 1808 Carlisle fled to Canada to escape debts. Seymour Sheldon took over in 1814, but Thomas closed the branch in 1817 because of financial reverses, secondary to bad investments in the War of 1812 and losses from deception by his successive Walpole partners. The first edition of [Lindley] Murray's English Grammarr was published in 1795, and was widely circulated in England and America. It virtually monopolized the field until the publication and growing popularity of Noah Webster's grammar of American English. Murray's New York estate, "Bellevue," is now the site of the illustrious Bellevue Hospital. About 2,000,000 copies of Murray's Grammar were sold in all its editions, but it was inconsistent and had numerous shortcomings. This abridgement appears to have been published in order to simplify the grammar in the interest of consistency. Only one copy of this Abidgement is recorded in Imprints, at the American Antiquarian Society. Covers and spine chipped. Foxing and browning of pages. A catalogue number on label on cover with same number twice in pencil on preliminary pages. No library markings. Overall, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

8719
8719 Adams, John Quincy.- A Letter to the Hon. Harrison Gray Otis, a Member of the Senate of Massachusetts, on the Present State of Our National Affairs with Remarks upon Mr. Pickering's Letter to the Governor of the Commonwealth. Boston. Oliver and Munroe. 1808. Americana Pages 32 pp.8vo. Professionally bound in modern red buckram and new end papers. Gilt lettering on spine. Second Edition. Sabin 282. Shaw and Shoemaker 15824, AI 14281. In this pamphlet, Adams, then a U.S. senator, comments on the Embargo and the controversy with Great Britain that ultimately led to the War of 1812. He argues that State legislatures do not have the power to control the implementation of the powers vested by the Constitution in the Congress of the United States. He reviews the history of British impressment of American sailors and argues the illegality of that action. Adams is angered by British duplicity and calls on fellow citizens to be prepared to defend American sovereignty with trust in Heaven. A very clean copy. Corner clipped from title page without encroaching on text. Else, Near Fine.
Price: $80.00

8974
8974 Anonymous.- Address of the Carriers. In Boston Weekly Magazine, Saturday Even.Jan. 1, 1803, Vol. I, No. X, p. 7. Boston. Gilbert & Dean. 1803. Americana Pages 8 pp. Complete issue of the magazine, disbound. First Edition. The carriers' good wishes to the patrons and the management's high estimates of the carriers in a traditional New Year's greeting. A 34 line poem preceded by a Latin quotation from Horace. The magazine is otherwise replete with serialized fiction, anecdotes, verse, music, etc. Includes a quotation of an extract from a letter of 1775 by Patrick Henry, then Governor of Virginia, on Slavery, expressing his opposition to the laws which permit it and prediction of the future history of that institution in America.. Foxing. Few edge tears and chips at the fold. Else, Very Good.
Price: $165.00

8956
8956 Bingham, John A.- [Pamphlet]. Trial of the Conspiritors for the Assassination of President Lincoln, &c. Argument of John A. Bingham, Special Judge Advocate, in Reply to Arguments of Several Counsel for Mary E. Surratt, David E. Herold, Lewis Payne, George A. Atzerodt, Michael O'Laughlin, Samuel A. Mudd, Edward Spangler, and Samuel Arnold, Charged with Conspiracy and the Murder of Abraham Lincoln, Late President of the United States. Delivered June 27 and 28, 1865, before the Military Commission, Washington, D. C. Washington, DC. Government Printing Office. 1865. 122 pp.8vo. Tan printed paper wraps. First Edition. Monaghan 403. Appleton's Cyclpedia Am Biog. DAB. McDade 625. Bingham argues for the legality and appropriateness of the conspiracy trial and the legality of the venue. He establishes the legality of the declaration of Martial Law during the insurrection and the proper jurisdiction of the Military Court, the complicity of Jefferson Davis through Canadian agents in the murder of President Lincoln as well as his hopes for the execution of the principal leaders of Lincoln's government. Bingham openly expresses his conviction that Jefferson Davis was as guilty as John Wilkes Booth, Davis's amanuensis in inflicting the mortal wound on Lincoln. Bingham makes a forceful circumstantial case against each and every member of the conspiracy, including Dr. Samuel Mudd. Bingham (1815–1900) a lawyer was a Republican congressman from Illinois before becoming a judge advocate on Lincoln's appointment. He was a manager at Johnson's impeachment trial and later Minister to Japan from1873 to 1885, when he was removed by Grover Cleveland. Minor chipping and splitting at very ends of spine.Small label at top of spine. Soiling of covers. Else, Very Good+.
Price: $185.00

8827
8827 Buel, J[ames] W[illiam].- The James Boys. A Complete and Accurate Recital of the Dare-Devil Criminal Career of the Famous Bandit Brothers Frank and Jesse James and Their Noted Band of Bank Plunderers, Train Robbers and Murderers Specially Compiled for the Publishers. Chicago. M. A. Donohue & Co. N.D. [ca. 1883] Americana Pages 249 pp. + 8 pp. publisher's ads.12mo. Colorfully illustrated stiff paper wraps. First Edition. The Flashlight Detective Series, No. 72 McDade, 505–508. Adams, Six Guns, #546. Adams, Burs. A very romantic detailing of the lives and careers of the desperadoes Frank and Jesse James, children of a minister and "gallant' murderers and thieves. Jesse (1849–1882) was murdered by a trusted colleague. Frank (1845–?1915) then surrendered, was tried on one count of train robbery and murder and acquitted despite the confession of one of his gang, but miraculously avoided death from tuberculosis after being pardoned. There is some disagreement on the date of Frank's death. Many of their escapades, including a train robbery at Gad's Hill, Missouri, in 1874, are reported in florid detail. Buel was a popular writer on outlaws of the West and flourished around 1882–83, at the time of the end of Jesse James' life and the surrender of Frank James. Adams considers him unreliable as a historian, differing with Buel on the details of a few escapades. Buel had a strong hand with the romance of Western outlaws, as well evidenced in this narrative. Adams is unclear on the publication of Buel's book, but ascribes it to Henneberry Co. of Chicago, which had been formed as Henneberry & Donohue in 1871. Henneberry, never independent, was bought out by Donohue, who put out this Series. Both of these publishers were a partnership in 1883, when this book was presumably first written, the hardback carrying the Henneberry imprint and the volume in paper wraps labeled as published by Donohue. Adams does not list the book as by Buel, but this volume is clearly labeled so. Earlier (1881) publications on the James Brothers by Buel are cited by Adams (Six Guns, #142). Chips from edges of covers, not involving text or illustration. Pages browned. darkening of spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $195.00

8997
8997 Cowper, William.- The Negro's Complaint. In The Panoplist; or, The Christian's Armory, No. 23. No. 11. Vol.II, April, 1807, pp. 521–522. [Boston] [?The Congregational Church] 1807. 2 pp. Entire April, 1807 Issue (pp.489–536), Disbound. First Edition. Lippy, Rel. Period. U.S., p.342. William Cowper (1731–1800) was intermittently afflicted with depression and possibly deeper psychosis throughout his checkered life. He had stormy relationships with women including a cousin, whom he appears to have stalked. Hospitalized periodically because of his insanity, he wrote extensively on Milton and crafted numerous poems. Among these are "The Castaway" and this poem on slavery. The latter has been widely reprinted and often associated with a drawing of a kneeling Negro in bondage, often with the caption "Am I not a man and a brother?" It was an early appeal to rationality in the interest of emancipation from slavery and was widely quoted by Abolitionists. The Panoplist was an orthodox Congregationalist publication, like the Massachusetts Missionary Magazine, with which it merged in 1808. They were founded in the spirit of benevolent missionary work to the Indians and settlers, chiefly in Vermont and Maine . Strongly anti-Unitarian and anti-Universalist, it was one of numerous Congregationalist literary and religious productions, supported a few decades later by Nathanial Willis. Mild foxing and browning of pages. A few dog-ears. Faint water stain at margin of first leaf. Else, Very Good.
Price: $95.00

8741
Drayton, Daniel.- Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton, for Four Years and Four Months a Prisoner (for Charity's Sake) in Washington Jail, including a Narrative of the Voyage and Capture of the Schooner Pearl. Boston & New York. Bela Marsh & American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. 1855.Pages 122 pp.12mo. Embossed brown publisher's cloth withgilt titling on front cover. Binder's embossing onfront free fly paper: "Wm. Ulman / Binder / Boston." First Edition. Frontispiece portrait of the author. Not in Howes. M. N. Work, p. 337. Blockson 9838. Drayton, a native of New Jersey close to Delaware Bay, was a ship captain (from cook to captain in 4 months) on a Philadelphia-based coastal schooner, "Pearl," running between Delaware Bay and the Virginia shore, at times assisting African American slaves to escape to the North. Drayton details how his contacts with slave escapees touched his conscience and made him socially aware. He was found out and captured on the Potomoc River and imprisoned in a Washington jail for four years. The political debate and local reaction to his discovery and imprisonment were fierce and characteristic of extremist abolitionis debates. A meeting at Faneuil Hall in Boston included Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe (p.61)on the committee to raise money in Drayton's defense. With Drayton defended by Horace Mann, among others, the trial and sentence were a sham, promoted by a biased judge. Ultimately, Drayton was pardoned by President Fillmore, abetted by Senator Charles Sumner. A fine copy of an important document in the history of abolitionism in America. Copyright 1853. Owner's signature in pencil on front free end paper: "A. M. Robbins." Mild foxing of preliminary pages and page ends. Else, a bright and Very Good to Near Fine copy.
Price: $275.00

8884
Kimball, Gertrude Selwyn.- Providence in Colonial Times. Boston. Houghton Mifflin Company. 1912. Pages 392 pp.Large 8vo. Green publisher's cloth, rebacked with brown cloth and original paper label laid down on spine. First Edition. Illustrated. A documented history of Providence, RI till the Revolutionary War, wonderfully illustrated with drawings and pictures of documents, artefacts and buildings important to that history. The author died when this part was complete, but with the further manuscript only in the form of notes, here appended. The vigorous intellectual, social and architectural life of this city of only 4321 people at the time of the American Revolution is wonderfully described and illustrated. Ex libris. Library markings and stampings. Library book plate. Hinges cracked internally. Loose pages with chipping of edges, especially at beginning and end of volume. A few pages repaired with tape. The illustrations in beautiful condition with tissue guards intact. Not foxed. While the volume is Poor, all is present including index, and it can be restored to a handsome volume.
Price: $250.00

9000
King, Rev. T[homas] S[tarr].- [Pamphlet]. Patriotism. A Discourse Delivered before the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company on their CCXIII Anniversary. Boston. A. Tompkins. 1851. Pages 24 pp.8vo. Printed paper wraps. Sewn. First Edition. Appleton's Cycloped. Am.Biog., III,p. 547, II, pp.38–9. An historical and scriptural view of patriotism as a virtue. It presents a rational, consequentialist view of patriotism, but grounded in beneficence, truth, freedom and justice. The emphasis is deontological rather than in Aristotelian absolutes. While it sees a "manifest destiny" in America, the latter is based on virtue and justice in society, rather than raw power and historical accident. All in all, a very interesting view of patriotism at an historically critical time for America, with its threats of division and moral crisis. Thomas Starr King (1824–63) was a Unitarian (Universalist) minister, who, despite not being considered particularly learned, gained a great reputation as a public speaker and orator, on diverse subjects including literature, science, philosophy and particularly natural history. He was a learned champion of the White Mountains as a beauteous and natural resource, recording his views in The Boston Transcript and other newspapers, and was one of the very first to note the beauties of Yosemite Valley. He was called to California in 1860 and, as a staunch defender of the Union and abolitionist movement, can be credited in a major way for keeping California on the Union side. He died young in 1863 of diphtheria in California and is memorialized there. Of interest, the Commander of the Ancient ane Honorable Artillery Company in 1851–52 was the statesman Caleb Cushing, a Massachusetts legislator and congressman and later U. S. Attorney General, Commissioner to China, where he negotiated the first treaty between the U.S. and China, minister to Spain, troubleshooter in many roles for the U. S. government, codifier of the laws of the U. S. Congress and author. This copy is inscribed in pencil, on the front cover: "Rev. Mr. Shrugbury (?) / with respects of / C Cushing." Lacks rear cover. Front cover dusty, edge chipped and detached. Else, Very Good.
Price: $150.00

8960
[Luther, Martin].- Der Kleine Catechismus des sel. D. Martin Luthers. Nebst Den gewöhnlichen Morgen-Tisch- und Abend-Sebeten. Welchem Die Ordnung des Heils, in einem Liede, in kurzen Sätzen, in Frag und Antwort, und in einer Tabelle; Wie auch Eine Zergliederung des Catechismus, Das Würtembergische Kurze Kinder-Examen, Die Confirmation und Beichte beygefüget; Und Etliche Lieder, Frylingshausens Ordnung des Heils, Das Güldene A, B, C der Kinder, und Die Sieben Buss-Psalmen, angehänget sind. Zum Gebrauch der Jungen und Alten. Philadelphia. G. and D. Billmeyer. 1815. Pages 128 pp.16mo. Contemporary tan quarter calf with boards covered in contemporary decorated paper. Tenth Edition. (Zehnte Auflage) Am. Imp. 35149. Seidensticker, p. 195. An early German catechism derived from Martin Luther and printed in German in Philadelphia. Has associated Biblical exercises, question and answer studies, a Biblical ABC exercise and psalms of atonement appended for general use. An important early document of Pennsylvania German Lutheran expression. American Imprints cites only one copy. The 16mo size has 12mo signatures. Tucked in is a beautiful "Reward of Merit" card (2 3/4" x 4 1/4"), undated, "Presented to N. G. Kepter / by T. A. Grier, / Teacher." The card has a title ribbon in blue with a scene (colored) of children playing with toy sailboats by a pond, in an illustrated cartouche surrounded by decorative flourishes and nautical scenes. Boards soiled and worn. Wear to spine, which is totally intact.Water stain on rear end papers. Foxing. Else a Very Good copy.
Price: $325.00

8911
"One of 'Em." - The Wide-Awake Gift: A Know-Nothing Token for 1855. "Put None but Americans on Guard To-Night." New York. J. C. Derby. 1854. Frontispiece portrait of Daniel Webster, engraved by J. C. Buttre. Illustrations by T. H. Matteson, also engraved by Buttre or by Rice and Buttre. Pages 312 pp.12mo. Red publisher's cloth embossed and decorated with gilt illustration of George Washington on front cover and gilt illustrated and lettered spine. First Edition. Illustrated with plates. The Know-Nothing movement of the 1840-1850's was a xenophobic, anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant (especially Irish Catholics fleeing the famine in Ireland), jingoistic movement founded by "native-born" Americans and achieving some temporary political success. They adopted George Washington, Patrick Henry and others as their symbols and published this volume of patriotic Americana to stir their troops in the battle to defend their form of an America for Americans. Spine ends and corners slightly bumped and worn. Minimal foxing and browning. Owner's signature in pencil on front free end-paper ("C. Y. Sturtevant/ Hartlund/Vermont/May23rd/1863"). Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

8982
[Pamphlet][Carrier's Address] The Old Year Lies in State. The New Year Takes His Own. New Year's Greeting. Compliments of the Troy Times. 1886. Trot, [NY]. The Troy Times. 1886. Pages 8 pp.Large 8vo. Illustrated stiff paper wraps, embossed with a seal. Calendar on rear cover. First Edition. A typical newspaper carrier's address, celebrating the New Year, reminiscing on the good and bad of the Old. Among the items discussed were the death of Grant. The New Year promises to each his paramount wish, wealth, health, love, etc. The moral, however is that each must earn his wish by hard work and good behavior, not the ease encouraged by the beginning of the New Year. The final verses quote the words of Dickens' Tiny Tim, "God bless us, ev'ry one." Covers detached. Corners creased. Else, Very Good.
Price: $85.00

8660
[Pamphlet] Willard, Joseph.- A Letter to an English Friend on the Rebellion in the United States, and on British Policy. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1862. Pages 28 pp.8vo. Printed paper wraps. Mountedwith linen tape to binder's board. First Edition. Sabin 40428. NUC for attribution. A private letter to an English friend who gave permission for its publication in 1862. Sabin lists it without attribution, but NUC reports it as attributed to Joseph Willard (1798–1865), to whom the printed version is attributed. The letter is a calm rejoinder to an English correspondent concerned about the deteriorating relations beytween England and the United States at the beginning of the Civil War. The Englishman is urged not to be influenced by New York rowdies or muck-raking newspapers. Good old New England, ever sober and thoughtful, is fundamentally calm and still engaged in every-day life issues. The Rebellion by hot-heads, traitors and base proponents of slavery, before Lincoln's election encouraged by "that imbecile coward, President Buchanan,"is gigantic and found the United States ill-prepared militarily. But this is changing and the Rebellion will be fought vigorously and successfully. The author expected England and Europe to ally with the North (shared ancestry, hospitality to the Prince of Wales on his 1860 visit, and English attitudes toward slavery are some reasons cited). Perfidious ex-Senators and slanders against Lincoln have been poisoning the English mind. Slavery must be eliminated. The North of the United States has great guilt over slavery, but slavery there was an unhealthy inheritance from England, who granted charters for the slave trade in Africa introducing slavery to North America. Before 1775, England resisted the elimination of slavery in America. our shared history and attitudes will prevail. A post-script by E.P., Esq. recalls an article by [?John Stuart] Mill in Fraser Magazine for February, showing great comprehension of the issues in the American War of Rebellion and, presumably, opposing slavery and the position of the South, while cautioning England against misplaced sympathy with the South. Joseph Willard was a resident of Lancaster, Massachusetts, a member of the Worcester County Bar Association, and author of a local history of Lancaster, memoirs of Rev. Samuel Willard, Vice-President of Harvard College, editor of Mary White Rowlandson's narrative of Indian captivity, publisher of the 1862 plans for a militia, collector of Willard genealogy dating from Samuel Willard (1605–1676), etc. Of great interest here is the allusion to the great guilt and engagement of the North in slavery and the English roots of this behavior, not much discussed until recent reactivation of discussion of racial issues in America. The author was fully cognizant of how this guilt informed the behavior of the North in ( and after) the Civil War. Ex libris with only small library stamp on last page. Cover edges chipped and soiled. Only very minor foxing. One correction in pen of textual misspelling. Else, Good to Very Good.
Price: $85.00

8904
Penniman, Major.- Illustrated with wood engravings by Kilburn & Mallory. The Tanner-Boy and How He Became Lieutenant-General. Boston. Roberts Brothers. 1864. Pages 316 pp.8vo. Brown publisher's cloth, blind ruled on covers and illustrated and gilt on spine. First Edition, Eighth Thousand. A contemporary biography of Ulysses S. Grant, emphasizing his youth and the formative influences on his personality and career. Bookseller's label on front pastedown for Durkee & Jenkins, Albany, NY. Spine illustration and titling still bright. Few brown spotson page edges and a bit of soiling, but virtually no foxing. Slightly shaken. Else, Very Good.
Price: $95.00

8940
Robbins, Archibald.- A Journal, Comprising an Account of the Loss of the Brig Commerce, of Hartford, (Con.) James Riley, Master, upon the Western Coast of Africa, August 28th, 1815; also of the Slavery and Sufferings of the Author and the Rest of the Crew, upon the Desert of Zahara, in the Years 1815, 1816, 1817; with Accounts of the Manners, Customs, and Habits of the Wandering Arabs; also, a Brief Historical and Geographical View of the Continent of Africa. Hartford, CT. Silas Andrus. 1818. Pages 275 pp.12mo in 6's. Full polished and grained calf. Third Edition. Sabin #71738. Am. Imprints #45551[,2–7 for later editions] A detailed account of the wreck of the Brig Commerce in a violent gale off the west coast of Africa, the trials and tribulations of the crew in their unsuccessful efforts to avoid the Arab hordes, whose customs and style are described, as well as the resourcefulness of the crew in surviving, the traversal of the Sahara and arrival in Morocco, then populated by a mixed culture of chiefly Arabs and Jews, with many Christian slaves. They ultimately arrived in Tangier and the safety of the American consulate in Gibraltar. A lively and informative narrative. Rare in this early edition. Head of spine slightly worn with wear at corners. Foxing. A short tear in edge of one page of "Contents" with no loss. Browning of page edges with small water stain on front free end paper and edge of title. Overall a very tight, and, except for lack of the map, a Very Good copy.
Price: $160.00

8773
Ruffin, Edmund.- An Essay on Calcareus Manures. Cambridge, MA. The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. 1961. Pages 199 pp.8vo. Red publisher's cloth. Illustrated D.J. First Edition in this format. original publication 1832. The John Harvard Library. A republication of an extremely important 1832 book on agriculture by a noted Southern secessionist. Ruffin was a student of nutrition of plants provided by the soil and in classic, scientifically controlled experiments on his own farm, he demonstarted the increased yield of vegetables by supplementation of the earth with nutrients, in this case calcium carbonate to provide acid neutralization and supplemental calcium in calcium deficient Virginia soil. His work revolutionized agriculture in tidewater Virginia. He includes a useful appendix on the economics of slave labor, of which he was an ardent proponent. Ruffin was a violent defender of the Southern way of life, urged secession, saw the Civil War coming and volunteered in South Carolina. He was selected to fire the first shot on Fort Sumter. After the defeat of the South, still pledging his hatred of Yankee rule, Ruffin committed suicide. The editorial introduction and annotations in this edition are very useful. Soiling of top edge of text block and of D.J. 1/2" tear at top rear of D.J. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

8374
Scott, Sir Walter and Sanderson, Mr. [James].- March and Chorus in the Dramatic Romance of the Lady of the Lake and Chorus Hail to the Chief Written by Walter Scott Esqr. Philadelphia. G. Willig. N.D. [1812–1815]. Pages 4 pp.Folio. Self covers. Disbound. First Edition. Thomson, p. 39. Wolfe, Secular Music in America, II, p. 773, #7780. Lee, Concise DNB, p.1156. Fuld, World-Famous Music (Dover). Grolier Online. A first edition of the anthem of the President of the United States. Early 19th Century sheet music with verses by Walter Scott put to music by Mr. [James] Sanderson (1769–1841). The songs, which include "Hail to the Chief," later selected to be the anthem of the President of the United States are from "Lady of the Lake," which was published in 1810. The paper and typography of this music suggest that it was published not long thereafter, and this issue is recorded by Wolfe for 1812–15, thus conforming to criteria for the first edition. Sanderson, an orchestral director and composer in London, wrote the accepted tune of "Comin' thro' the Rye" as well as many tunes popular in America. Fuld calls this the first appearance of the music for "Hail to the Chief," the American Presidential Anthem. Grolier reports that the first playing of "Hail to the Chief" to announce the arrival of the President was at the March 4, 1837 inauguration of Martin Van Buren. Pencilled fingerings of initial march. Minor foxing. Else, Very Good.
Price: $1,000.00

8375
Sousa, John Philip.- March. The Washington Post. For Piano. Philadelphia. Harry Coleman. 1889. Pages 3 pp. + Publisher's Ads.Folio. Decorated printed paper covers. First Edition. One of Sousa's most played marches, here presented for solo piano. Dedicated by him to Gen. Frank Hatton and Mr. Beriah Wilkins. A list of popular Sousa compositions on inside of front cover. Small tears in margins, not affecting text. Hinge starting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $55.00

8954
Spooner, Lysander.- [Pamphlet]. A Defence for Fugitive Slaves, against the Acts of Congress of February 12, 1792, and September 18, 1850. Boston. Bela Marsh. 1850. Pages 72 pp.Large 12mo in 6's. Self wraps. Lacks printed paper outer wraps. Disbound. First Edition. Lysander Spooner, the great legalist reformer and tilter at windmills, here further argues his views on the unconstitutionality of slavery and its associated laws and customs. He provides a constitutional basis for his opposition to the fugitive slave laws of 1793 and 1850. He bases his reasoning on seven points in conflict with the constitution, among which are the absence of provision for trial by jury, the lack of constitutional provision for the Commissioners and State Magistrates established by those laws as tribunal for adjudication, the prior inadmissability of some forms of evidence and the lackof Habeus Corpus provisions. Spooner fleshes out these arguments in some detail. Soiling, externally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $235.00

8955
Spooner, Lysander.- [Pamphlet]. The Unconstitutionality of Slavery. Boston. Bela Marsh. 1856. Large 12mo in 6's. Tan printed paper outer wraps. Enlarged Edition (Fourth Edition, Third Enlarged Edition). Seventh Thousand. DAB. Appleton's Cyclopedia Am. Biog. Original copyright 1845, misprinted 1847. Lysander Spooner (1808–1887) was a prominent lawyer of Boston interested in constitutional matters. He was an ardent abolitionist, who was convinced of the unconstitutionality of slavery. He hoped to abolish that institution by judicial action and published this tract on the matter. Spooner was intense about using the court of law as a means of reform. Wendell Phillips (1811–1884), an orator of Boston, and also an abolitionist published a pamphlet in 1847 attacking the first issue of this pamphlet, hoping to reform slavery, which he considered constitutional, by the political process and new legislation. According to the reviews of Spooner's original pamphlet, extracted here on the inside of the covers, William Lloyd Garrison, the leader of the abolitionist movement, found Spooner's legal arguments irrefutable. Spooner often tilted at windmills, as here, providing elegant but futile legal arguments for his views. As a result of his uncompromising views, he had few friends, spending most of his time at the Boston Athenaeum. This volume is in two parts; the second part (originally published in 1847) deals with some of Phillips' arguments. Also included are two appendices: the first repeating sections of Spooner's separate treatment of the Fugitive Slave laws, first published in 1850; the second appendix is a group of suggestions to Abolitionists who believe slavery to be (misguidedly) constitutional. Editions appeared in 1845, 1847, 1850, 1856 and 1860. Ex libris with only a few markings. Mild soiling of covers. Tiny chip from margin of cover and unmarked paper label on lower spine. Else, Very Good to Near Fine.
Price: $265.00

8848
Stillé, Charles J[aneway].- [Pamphlet] How a Free People Conduct a Long War: A Chapter from English History. Philadelphia. Collins, Printer. 1862. Pages 39 pp.8vo. Yellow printed paper wraps. First Edition. Appleton's Cycloped. Am.Biog. DAB. Stillé (1819–99) was a prominent historian in mid-century (19th), a Yale trained lawyer, an active member of the important U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War, later its historian, Professor and Provost of the University of Pennsylvania and champion of graduate and scientific education there. He wrote a number of pamphlets during the Civil War, of which this is a leading example. In this pamphlet Stillé compares the American Civil War with the struggle of England against the French Revolution and Napoleon. In very temperate language he is vigorous in his support of the Union cause. Aware of the early criticisms of the American war effort and the slow progress of its military, Stillé shows that the progress of war never fulfills popular expectations. Episodic progress is punctuated always by glaring blunders and faulty strategy by generals. Specific examples from the British experience are illustrated in a cogent, historically accurate manner. Civil War comparisons are made with emphasis, including the search for skilled generals and an examination of the charges of excessive casualties and illness among the soldiers. Stillépresents an historical confirmation of American progress in warfare and a literate, real-life example for Stendahl's picture of the confusion at the Battle of Waterloo. Mild soiling of covers. Vertically creased with a single fold. Faint waterstain at lower corner. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

8873
Swift, Miss Mary A.- First Lessons on Natural Philosophy., for Children. Part First. Hartford. Belknap and Hamersley. 1847. Pages 107 pp.4" x 5 1/4". Illustrated paper covered boards. Stereotype Edition. (Originally published 1833). Illustrated with wood engravings. A fascinating children's book with a bottom line catechism on science as known at the first third of the 19th century. Includes a discourse on geography, astronomy and Herschel, meteorology, Isaac Newton and gravitation, cohesion and states of matter and solid bodies and lays the foundation of scientific principles to the creation by God. Soiled. Covers detached and resewn crudely with new cloth spine attached. Defective: lacks front end papers; excision and loss of pp. 9/10 (text), 11/12 (illustration), 37/38 (illustration). Colored and black pencil markings. Foxing. Overall, Poor condition.
Price: $40.00

8948
Thayer, M. Russell.- A Reply to Mr. Charles Ingersoll's "Letter to a Friend in a Slave State." Philadelphia. John Campbell. 1862. Pages 26 pp.8vo. Printed paper wraps. First Edition. Charles Ingersoll, supposedly an advocate of the Union in the Civil War, had written a public letter to a Southern friend, urging settlement of differences by giving in to Southern demands. Thiis reply by Thayer appeals on Constitutional grounds and on precedent for the righteousness of the Union cause and urges no compromise or surrender. Minor chips from spine and lwer corner. Splitting of hinges for 1" at head and tail. Soiling of covers, displaying two erasures on front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $65.00

8739
The Author of Peter Parley's Tales [pseud. for Goodrich, S. G. ].- History of the Indians, of North and South America. Boston. Bradbury, Soden & Co. 1844. Pages 320 pp.Small 8vo. Half brown calf with marble covered boards. First Edition. Illustrated with wood engravings of Native Americans, Cortés, et al. and with elaborate wood engravings of printer's devices at end of chapters. Roorbach, I, 223. The history of encounters of Native Americans with the Western invaders in The West Indies, Mexico, South American (Incas, Araucanians, etc), and North America (discussing the once-numerous North American tribes). The author regrets that "such multitudes have perished in the vain attempt to resist outrage and oppression [by the invading White man]." In the last chapter, he discusses the prospects for the Western tribes and proposes doing our all to give the Indians "the benefits of our own religion and civilization" and prepare them to come into the fold of the government as members of the Union. The author, further, hopes that the government and the people of the United States will hear his message that peace, obedience to law, civil rights, education and the gospel will help to civilize the remaining Indians. Apparently, the government did listen, with questionable help to the Native Americans resulting. Overall, a nice copy of the first edition of an important statement of the White man's view of Native Americans in the early Nineteenth Century. Owner's signature on front pastedown: "Wm Brigham," repeated in pencil on Contents page. Wear to covers, at ends ofspine and corners with external starting of front hinge. Abrasion of marbled boards. Foxing. Else, Very Good with tight and attractive text block.
Price: $185.00

8953
Tuttle, Hudson.- [Pamphlet]. Scenes in the Spirit World, or, Life in the Spheres. New York. Charles Partridge. 1866. Pages 143 pp.12mo. Printed tan paper wraps. Publisher's ads on covers. ?Second Edition. Partridge and Brittan's Spiritual Library. Originally copyright1853. A look at the approach of the harmonious life of the spirit, with the consequent end of tyrrany, slavery, false government, etc. Wear at edgesof spine and at corners, with small chips lacking. Minor soiling and rubbing. A Very Good copy.
Price: $125.00

8762
Upham, Charles Wentworth.- Illustrated with wood engravings, some signed by John Andrew and others by J. W. Orr or engraved by Richardson Cox. Frontispiece portrait of Fremont. Life Explorations and Public Services of John Charles Fremont. Boston. Ticknor and Fields. 1856. Pages 366 pp. + 12 pp. publisher's catalogue dated August, 1856.12mo. Embossed brown publisher's cloth with gilt titling on spine. First Edition. Thirtieth Thousand. Field 1589. Hill, p. 302. Wagner-Camp 282. Sabin 24838. Flake 9259. A story of the exploits of Fremont, published in 1856, just as he became the first Republican Party candidate for the presidency. The timing suggests this may be a campaign biography, a still active tradition. Field calls for 12 illustrations, but this volume contains 13 Minimal wear at ends of spine and at corners. Gilt is very bright and cloth is very clean. Text block excellent with only a bit of foxing and offsetting. Overall, Very Good +.
Price: $125.00

8368
Van Buren, Martin and Forsyth, John.- Trade with China. Messsage from the Presaident of the United States, Transmitting A Report from the Secretary of State, in Answer to a Resolution of the House of Representatives, of the 7th Instant, Calling for Information respecting the Condition of the Citizens of the United States Doing Business in China, the State of American Trade with That Country, &c., &c. February 25, 1840. Doc. No. 119. House of Reps. Executive. 26th Congress, 1st Session. Washington, DC. U. S. Government Printing Office. 1840. Pages 85 pp.8vo. Self Wraps, Enclosed in Modern Blue Paper Wraps with Printed Label. First Edition. A report to Congress on the problems American vessels and citizens were having in late 1839 with Chinese authorities, especially in Canton at the Hongs, because of Chinese attempts to interdict the opium trade. The Americans appear to encompass some violations of the inspection requirements and trade restrictions, but, on the whole, were more compliant with Chinese wishes and controls than other nationalities. The Americans were caught up in the aggressive pursuit by the British of illicit importation of opium into China, leading to a failed attempt by the British to blockade Canton at the mouth of the Pearl River, near Hong Kong, and to the Opium Wars. In the main, Americans supported the Chinese against foreign traders, the British especially, in the Opium Wars. Very Good.
Price: $38.00

8932
Wilsson, Rev. Edmund B.- [Pamphlet]. Henry Wheatland, M. D., Born January 11, 1812. Died February 27, 1893.Sermon Preached by Rev. Edmund B. Wilsson, at the North Church, Salem [MA], Sunday, March 5, 1893. Salem , MA. The Essex Institute. 1893. Pages 17 pp.8vo. Printed stiff paper wraps. Sewn. First Edition. . An eulogy on Dr. Henry Wheatland, illustrious citizen of Salem and single-minded benefactor of the cultural development of the community, advocate of the Essex Institute, public libraries, science and its diffusion to the public, acquaintance of the Cambridge academic elite and promoter of lectures by them to the Salem community. Covers soiled at edges. Spine separating at upper third. Else, Very Good.
Price: $35.00

8569
[Garfield] Jerome, Theo. C.- Our Martyred President. A Sermon Delivered in the First Congregational Churchof Manisteee, Mich., on the Sabbath following the Death of Garfield, by the Pastor, Theo. C. Jerome. Manistee, MI. First Congregational Church. 1881. 12 pp. 8vo. Blue printed paper wraps. Sewn. First Edition. A sermon promptly following Garfield's death at the hands of the assassin Guiteau. The late President's career in public service is recalled, as are his nomination following ovdr 30 ballots at the Republican Convention, his reluctant candidacy, his patriotism and great Presidential prospects, his bravery in facing death, the new American tradition of harmony after the rancorous period culminating in Lincoln's assassination, the strength and power of America. Of couse there is much about doing God's work, and the good that God brings to all, even in death. It ends with the exhortation of Longfellow's "Ship of State." All-in-all, a noble piece. Vertical fold. ?disbound. Else, Very Good.
Price: $85.00

8568
[Carrier's Address]. Annual Address of the Carriers. The Evening Gazette. Port Jervis, N. Y. January 1st, 1882 Port Jervis, NY. The Evening Gazette. 1882 2 pp. Small 8vo. Printed and illustrated paper wraps. First Edition. A poetic carrier's address on 2 pages of a 4-page folder. Text in light blue, framed in gilt borders. It addresses the nation at peace with its glorious history. It mourn's the recent loss of a President (Garfield) by a "coward's bullet," but recalls the glory of the American Revolution 100 years earlier, the Battle of Yorktown and the help to young America from foreign patriots and generals. It expresses pride in Port Jervis and the Gazette and asks for help to the noble carriers. Slight fraying of leading edges, not involving text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

8537
Drury, L[uke].- A Report of the Examination of Rev. Ephraim K. Avery, Charged with the Murder of Sarah Maria Cornell. N.P. [Providence, RI.] L. Drury. 1833. 64 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wraps. First Edition. This trial was held in Providence from May 6 to June 2, 1833. Sarah Connell was found hanging from a hay frame, an apparent suicide, in Tiverton, R.I.. She was 5 months pregnant and had left a note at home urging people to inquire of Rev. Avery in case she was missing. She had been a woman of ill-repute and had been repeatedly run out of town on charges of illicit consorting in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Avery was acquitted after a long trial with 196 witnesses. This report on the examination of Avery includes exerpts from significant other testimony. It also includes an Appendix. This issue corresponds with that described in the note to McDade 43, with additional material added to the text and the appendix beginning on p. 62. Owner's signature on cover: Wm. F. Mercer / Baltimore / Md. Lacks rear wrap. McDade 43
Price: $195.00

8490
Cobbett, William.- Life and Adventures of Peter Porcupine with Other Records of His Early Career in England & America, viz: Life & Adventures, the Scarecrow, Remarks of the Pamphlets, Talleyrand: a Spy, Farewell to America, A Court-Martial, A Retrospect. Limited Edition, Copy no.1596 of 1800 copies. London. The Nonesuch Press. 1927. 163 pp. Frontispiece by Gilray. 8vo. Linen spine and marble paper covered boards. First Edition,as such. A nice edition of some of the seminal American writings of this disgruntled English pamphleteer. printed in Baskerville on Arches paper. Some uncut pages. End papers browned and offset. Wear at edges of boards. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

8390
Ellis, George Edward].-\ Sketches of Bunker Hill Battle and Monument: with Illustrative Documents. Charlestown, MA. C. P. Emmons. 1843. 172 pp. 12mo. Brown Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Illustration of the Monument and Gilt Lettering on Front Cover. Third Edition. An interesting brief compendium of the history of The Battle of Bunker Hill and its memorial. It begins with a discussion of the American Revolution generally, before going to the Battle on Bunker Hill and Breeds Hill. The text is given of some British and American documents concerning the Battle and, following a map of Charlestown is a discussion of the Bunker Hill Monument on Breed's Hill. Sabin attributes the work (published anonymously) to Ellis on the basis of a reference in the New England General Register, XXI, 156. The monument was completed and dedicated on June 17, 1843, then commemorated by a speech by Daniel Webster (Inventory #7235). Spine worn and chipped. Front hinge cracked, but cords intact. Foxing. Else, Good. Folded map present. Sabin 22309 (first three editions). AI 43-1686. See Sabin 22517 for fourth edition.
Price: $65.00

8389
Engraving by Soatelli. - Veduta di Boston. Possibly Drawn by Sasso. Italy. N.P. N.D.[1810–1820] 6" x 9." Matted. First Edition. A charming early 19th Century view of Boston, contemporaneously hand colored, from an Italian book on America. The book is known to contain engravings drawn by Giovanni Antonio Sasso, who was active in Milan, Italy, in the period 1810–1816. Since this engraving is less sophisticated than Sasso's work, Soatelli may have done the original drawing as well as the engraving. Near Fine.
Price: $110.00

8370
Holmes, Oliver Wendell.- Urania: A Rhymed Lesson. Pronounced before the Mercantile Library Association, October 14, 1846. Boston. William D. Ticknor & Co. 1846. 31, [1] pp. 4to. Blue Printed Paper Wraps. Sewn. First Edition. The poet is critical of extremists in any cause, whether it be religion or abolition. It evoked some criticism by leading abolitionists on this basis. The poem was originally read on October 14, 1846, but, according to the Boston Evening Transcript for October 15, Holmes was preceded on the program by the orator, J. R. Ingersoll, who was so long- winded that Holmes had to shorten his poem in the reading. Covers chipped, soiled and detached. Modest water stain on corner of last sheet (p. 31 + Notes). Soft vertical crease mid-page, as usually noted with first editions of this pamphlet. Else, Very Good. BAL 8745. Ives, p.125. Currier, pp.39, 532.
Price: $185.00

8369
[Pamphlet] The Manifesto. Published by the United Societies. Vol. XXI. No. 10. October, 1891. Canterbury, NH. The United Societies (Shaker). 1891. Pp. 217–240. 8vo. Blue Printed Paper Wraps. First Edition. An especially interesting issue of the Shaker journal. "The Kentucky Revival" by Richard M'Nemar, originally published in 1808 and entitled "New Lights and Schismatics" is reprinted. It details the origin of the dance from a series of involuntary exercises as part of Shaker doctrine which functioned to exorcise any tendency to carnal depravity and how dance led to visions and the spirit of prophecy. A second article on "The Shakers and the Cause of Peace" reports the origin of the doctrine of conscientious objection to war by the Shakers in the 1770 revelations to Ann Lee, a doctrine derived from that of the Quakers (Joseph Hoag's 1803 prophecy concerning redemption in part throught the abolition of war). Shakers avoided military service, not by paying bounties to substitutes or claiming medical exemption, but through an open appeal to conscience. This was expressed in America from the Revolutionary War on. Later, Wm. Henry Harrison petitioned the Ohio Legislature to give substitute service to conscientious objectors in place of military service. But it was Abraham Lincoln, in the Civil War, who, with Secretary of War Stanton, pushed through Congress an act exempting Quakers and Shakers from military service and giving them duty to care for sick and wounded soldiers. Very Good.
Price: $85.00

8318
Jameson, J. Franklin (Editor).- Correspondence of John C. Calhoun, in Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1899, Volume II. House of Representatives Document No.733, 56th Congress, 1st Session. Washington, DC. Government Printing Office. 1900. 1218 pp. 8vo. Green Publisher's Cloth. First Edition. The entire extant correspondence to and from John C. Calhoun, the great Senator from South Carolina in the critical period up to his death in 1850. Numerous references to the important events and issues of the time including the issue of slavery in the South and in the new territories of the United States, issues that were to lead to the Civil War. Ex Libris, with few markings. Covers abraded. Hinges cracked internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

8279
Frieze, Jacob.- A Concise History, of the Efforts to Obtain an Extension of Suffrage in Rhode Island; from the Year 1811 to 1842. Providence. Benjamin F . Moore. 1842. 171 pp. 12mo. Brown Publisher's Cloth Embossed, with Gilt Titling on Front Cover. First Edition. Jacob Frieze was an anti-Dorr pamphleteer, who had, in fact, voted for the People's Constitution in December, 1841, under the impression that it was an opinion without binding force. This volume is accepted as the standard Law & Order accountof the Dorr Rebellion. Foxed. Wear to Head and Tail and Edges of Spine and to Corners.Front Cover Stain.Else, Very Good. Bartlett, p. 129. Heard & Hamsa, Bookman's Guide to Americana (9th Ed.),p. 160. Park, RI Biblio., #363.Gettleman, "The Dorr Rebellion."
Price: $250.00

8278
Galbraith, Mr.- US Govt. Documents: Ho. of Reps., 24th Congress, 2nd Session. Rep. No.306. Banking Companies. March 3, 1837 Washington, DC. U. S. Government. 1837. 25 pp. 8vo. Removed. First Edition. The Select Committee had been referred memorials regarding an amendment to the U. S. Constitution in relation to banking corporations in the states. This is part of the continuing saga of the Bank of the United States, originally chartered by Congress but discharged by Andrew Jackson. This is the Final Report of the Select Committee. Continuing under Pennsylvania charter, the United States Bank was reissuing notes for obligations to the United States. The Commitee here suggests an amendment to the United States Constitution barring any state from authorizing any corporation to issue bank notes or other paper for circulation. This document reviews the arguments for a hard currency and the definition and functions of banks. Adam Smith is quoted on his view that bad (paper) money drives out good (specie). The committee argues that excess paper is inflationary. This Document represents a major step in the advancement of a stable national currency. Minor soiling and offsetting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

8277
Galbraith, Mr.- US Govt. Documents: Ho. of Reps., 24th Congress, 2nd Session. Rep. No.272. Notes of the Bank of the United States [To Accompany Bill H.R. No. 956]. February 22, 1837. Washington, DC. U. S. Government. 1837. 10 pp. 8vo. Removed. First Edition. The Select Committee had been referred memorials regarding an amendment to the U. S. Constitution in relation to banking corporations in the states and reissuance of notes of the late Bank of the United States. This is part of the continuing saga of the Bank of the United States, originally chartered by Congress but discharged by Andrew Jackson. Continuing under charter of Pennsylvania, the Bank was reissuing notes for obligations to the United States. Congress was displeased and in this report enjoins the Bank from carrying on with this practice. Minor soiling and offsetting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $45.00

8275
Hutchins, Thomas, Esq.- Description of the Mississippi River. Pp. 35–38 in "The Universal Asylum, and Columbian Magazine," for July, 1792. Philadelphia. 1792. Pp. 3–72. 4to. Disbound. Stab Sewn. First Edition. An eloquent description of the Mississippi River by the Geographer to the United States with commentary on the fertility of its sediments, the prevalent species of fish. The finding of shrimp as far up river as Natchez is commented upon. Other articles of importance include: "Extracts from Paine's Rights of Man - Part II," a continuation of "History of the American Revolution," a review of James Sullivan's "An Enquiry into the Constitutional Authority of the Supreme Federal Court over the Several States," and "Historical Sketch of the Proceedings of Congress" for 1791 in which is a discussion of the debate over the proper apportionment ratio of Congressional Representatives to population, given the recently completed Census of the U. S. Population.This magazine, a continuation of the Columbian Magazine, was founded by a group including Matthew Carey in 1786 and continued in publication till 1792. Mott calls this the handsomest American magazine of its century. It published Jeremy Belknap and Benjamin Rush. It printed the first magazine fiction and made a specialty of reviewing American publications. After 1789 it included an on-going history of the American Revolution. The magazine included chronicles of the U. S. Congress and published the entertaining Columbian Parnassiad. Lacks covers. Few stains. Last few pages loose. Corners folded. Edge of pp. 71/72 frayed. Else, Very Good. F. L. Mott, Hist. Am. Magazines, Vol. I. Chielens, Am. Lit. Mag., 112–6.
Price: $150.00

8274
Smith, Robert. (Report from The Committee on Roads and Canals).- US Govt. Documents: Ho. of Reps., 29th Congress, 1st Session. Rep. No.676. Improvement of the Mississippi River [To Accompany Bill H.R. No. 67]. May 4, 1846. Washington, DC U. S. Government. 1846. 10 pp. 8vo. Removed. First Edition. The Committee on Roads and Canals had been referred a bill regarding the Des Moines and Rock River Rapids. In this report the Committee disposes of the constitutional argument whereby the Federal government has the right to make improvements on the Mississippi River. The retail cost of the vast quantities of lead mined in the State of Illinois and the Territories of Iowa and Wisconsin are augmented 25% by the need to pass these rapids at low water level. Also lost is the excessive cost and wastage of wheat and other produce due to seasonal need to pass the rapids. The value of local Federal and other lands is hence substantially reduced by the impact of the rapids. Tolls and local initiative are inadequate to the task. The committee recommends appropriation for the work in clearing the rapids and dredging by the Federal government. Appended is the engineering study supporting the feasibility of the project. Included tables document the required excavation. Minor spotting and offsetting. Else, Very Good.
Price: $45.00

8273
[ D. G. Farragut]. Mr. Ash, from the Committee on Naval Affairs.- US Govt. Documents: Ho. of Reps., 22d Congress, 2nd Session. Rep. No.279. Report of the Committee on Naval Affairs, to Which Was Referred the Memorial of D[avid] G[lasgow] Farragut. Washington, DC U. S. Government. 1837. 1 p. 8vo. Removed. First Edition. Farragut (1801–70) was one of our most distinguished Naval Officers, famous, of course, for his attack at New Orleans and capture of the city in April, 1862, a move which destroyed the Confederate fleet and opened the Mississippi to free Union passage. Farragut, a respected officer throughout his long Naval career beginning at age 9, and in command of a prize ship as Midshipman at age 12, became the first Admiral of the U.S. Navy. Throughout the Nullification crisis of 1833, Farragut was in South Carolina as the highly effective Executive Officer on the "Natchez," which was then sent to Brazil. In Rio in1834, Farragut, in command of the schooner "Boxer,' saw it through a complete rebuilding and refitting there. This document refers to Farragut's request for extra pay in reimbursement of expenses when in Rio. The Committee on Naval Affairs rejected his claim since he had received both offficial orders and his regular pay as a Naval Lieutenant. They saw no reason to pay him extra when on official duty. Near Fine. Appleton's Cyclopædia of American Biography.
Price: $45.00

8260
Chambers, Henry E.- Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Herbert B. Adams, Editor. Fourteenth Series. I. Constitutional History of Hawaii. Baltimore. The Johns Hopkins Press. 1896. 40 pp. + 9 PP. Publ. Catalogue. 8vo. Printed Paper Wraps. First Edition. In addition to a brief review of Hawaiian History , which is marked by American jingoist commentary, the principal part of this pamphlet is a listing of the major codicils of the successive Hawaiian constitutions, through the monarchy down to the just (1894–6) established republic. The author concludes that Hawaii was now ready for a bright future either as an independent republic or as a territorial annex of the United States. The latter was, of course, just then in the offing. The constitutional review is very useful. Water Stain on Cover. Few Small Chips. Else, Very Good.
Price: $175.00

8259
Wells, David A[mes].- Robinson Crusoe’s Money; or, the Remarkable Financial Fortunes and Misfortunes of a Remote Island Community. New York. Harper & Brothers. 1876. 118 pp. + 8 pp. Publ. Catalogue. 8vo. Illustrated Paper Wraps, as Issued. First Edition. Thomas Nast Illustrations. Satirical Novel on Currency Controversies. Against Paper Money. Illustrated Cover. Corner of Front Cover Cracked at Margin. Cover soiled. Else, Very Good. Wright III 5858. See DAB 19 for David A. Wells.
Price: $150.00

8171
Styron, William.- The Confessions of Nat Turner. A novel. New York. Random House. 1967. 428 pp. 8vo. Black Publisher's Cloth. D.J. First Edition. Few small chips at head of D.J. spine. Decorations very bright. Very Good in Very Good D.J.
Price: $125.00

8154
[Bronze Plaque] Abraham Lincoln. N.D. 4 1/4" x 7". A bronze plaque of Lincoln's head in profile. Good relief and nice detail. Mounted on board.. An identical plaque recently appeared at auction.
Price: $300.00

8131
Various (Oliver Wendell Holmes. Joaquin Miller, Julia Ward Howe, et al.).- The Poets' Tributes to Garfield. A Collection of Many Memorial Poems. With Portrait and Biography. Cambridge, MA. Moses King. 1882. 168 pp. Portrait Frontispiece. Small 4to. Gilt Decorated Red Cloth. A.E.G. Front Paper Wrap (?) Bound in. First Edition. Originally to be the 12 poems in tribute to President Garfield published by the Boston Globe, this collection grew to 160 items of tribute with the outpouring of grief and adulation upon the assassination of Grafield by Guiteau. One poem, reprinted from "The Springfield Republican," entitled "Garfield and Lincoln," is by A. Bronson Alcott. Fading of Spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $125.00

8109
Ingersoll, Robert G.- John G. Farnsworth, Receiver of the Bankers' and Merchants' Telegraph Co. vs. Western Union Telegraph Co. Robert G. Ingersoll's Opening Speech to the Jury. Delivered May 21st, 1886. New York N.P. (? Privately Published) 1886. 40 pp. 8vo. Pamphlet. Salmon Printed Paper Covers. First Edition. The beginning of an important court case involving the major telegraph companies in the east. The receiver of the bankrupt Bankers' and Merchants' Telegraphic Company was trying to recover its property from the rapacious Western Union Telegraph Co. and the devious fiinancier Jay Gould. This opening speech of the lawyer for the receiver outlines his view of the history of the case and the reasons the jury should decide against Western Union Telegraph Co. and Gould, who is called impudent, malicious, avaricious and greedy by Ingersoll. Gould allegedly had sent a violent gang to take over the receiver's property. The mob, at Gould's instigation, allegedly, cut all the telegraph wires of the Bankers' company. A very important incident in the business history of the 19th Century and in the history of the telegraph in America. Stains on Front Cover. Chips from Edges of Cover, Not Involving Text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $90.00

8106
Anonymous.- A Review of the Rev. Dr. Channing's Discourse, Preached at the Dedication of the Second Congregational Unitarian Church, New York, December 7, 1826. Boston. Hilliard, Gray, Little, and Wilkins. 1827. 91 pp. 4to. Printed Paper Cover. First Edition. Notation on cover in contemporary hand, "Recd. Feb. 6, 1843. The Gift of the Rev. Luther Hamilton, of Concord, N. H." This is a 91 page review of Channing's 57 page sermon. It defends the Orthodox view of the Trinity against the Unitarian "heresy." it also goes in for some scathing criticism of Channing, finding him "objectionable" in temper, mode of reasoning, incompleteness of argument,departure from the faithof the New England Fathers, standing against evangelical Christianity with Deistical thought. The Review ends with a ringing appeal to all to protect themseves and their children from such heresies as Channing espouses. Removed. Stab Holes from Prior Binding. Else, Very Good. AI 30425
Price: $75.00

8104
Parton, J[ames] - The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune. New York. Mason Brothers. 1855. 442 pp. Illustrations bound in, with tissue guards. 12mo. Brown Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Illustration of Printers and Printing Press and Gilt Titling. First Edition. Illustrated by A. Waud with engravings by Swinton. An unsponsored biography of the great editor and anti-slavery spokesman. The author's first book. Parton (1822–91) was born in England and immigrated to America when very young. He lived in Newburyport. He did many biographies, besides Greeley, of Burr, Andrew Jackson, Franklin(see Howes), Jefferson, et al and wrote on smoking and drinking, caricature, and women. A popular literary figure, he seemed to admire tycoons and captains of industry. On pp. 273–4 is an editorial written by Greeley in support of Charles Dickens' plea for American participation in international copyright protection. This volume was copyright 1854. Preface dated December, 1854. Owner's Signature of Rufus Stoddard, dated Feb 17th 1855 on front free fly leaf. The artist, Alfred R. Waud (1828–91) was a Civil War combat artist for Harper's Weekly. Always popular, he was noted for the first illustration of Custer's Last Stand. Foxing. Stain on lower corner of some leaves and on cover. Else Very Good. Adams, Dictionary of Am. Authors. Heard, Bookman's Guide to Americana. Foley, Am. Authors. Concise DAB. S. Hamilton, Early Am. Book Ill.
Price: $125.00

8094
[Peirce, Augustus], Tau , The Pi (Editors and Patrons). (pseud.: Enginae Societatis Poeta).- The Rebelliad; or, Terrible Transactions at the Seat of the Muses; a Poem in Four Cantos, Auctore Enginae Societatis Poeta. Edited and Patronised by the Pi Tau. Cambridge, MA. Welch, Bigelow, and Company. 1863. 77 pp. Cast of Characters on Unnumbered page at Rear. Green Publisher's Cloth. Second Edition, by Private Subscription. Comic frontispiece drawn by J. Phillips, engraved by F.E. Worcester (identified from First Edition). Harvard University Item. Author Presumably of Class of 1818 (Med. Fac.). This Copy Inscribed by "G. T. W. Ware/ for/ W. T. I." (N.D.). Editor’s Preface Dated 1842. A Comic Poem of Student Rebellion vs. the University Administration. Scarce (we have also handled a copy of the First Edition of 1842). Front free flyleaves slightly stained. Covers with small bubbles. Rear hinge starting internally. Else, Very Good. Hamilton makes note of the work of Phillips and Worcester for this volume, which is specifically cited. S. Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators & Wood Engravers, (1968) I, #1167.
Price: $225.00

8044
Judd, Bernice, Sexton, Audrey B., Wilcox, Barbara S., Alexander, Elizabeth G.- Missionary Album. Portraits and Biographical Sketches of the American Protestant Missionaries to the Hawaiian Islands. Introduction from the 1937 Edition by Albert F. Judd, 2nd. Honolulu. Hawaiian Mission Children's Society. 1969. 222 pp. Profusely Illustrated. Large 8vo. Publisher's Cloth. D.J. Third (Enlarged) Edition. Copy #276 of 1000 Copies. Originally published in 1901, and again in 1937. This issue contains new material. Has Addenda and Errata Slip, as well as note from Hawaiian Mission Children's Society about the Errata Slip. Tucked in is Xerox Copy of a letter, allegedly from Samuel T. Armstrong of the missionary family, while at Normal School after attending Williams: it discusses a debt of $10 to Harry Hopkins and relays news from the Islands, two engagements, a birth and neonatal death under "peculiar circumstances," and the sexual exploits of a missionary in Micronesia. The author himself delights in the women of the Normal School. Hinge of D.J. Tearing with Chips from Spine of D.J. Useful Pencil Annotations Internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

8022
Bancroft, George.- Memorial Address on the Life and Character of Abraham Lincoln, Delivered, at the Request of Both Houses of the Congress of America, before Them, in the House of Representatives at Washington, on the 12th of February, 1866. Washington, DC. Government Printing Office. 1866 69 pp. Protrait frontispiece of Lincoln, with tissue guard. 8vo. Publisher's Cloth. First Edition. Owner's Signature of Front Free End Paper: E. Countryman. This was the principal address before Congress, President Andrew Johnson, Gen. Grant, the Chief Justice and Foreign Ministers. It is a summary of Lincoln's Life and accomplishments. The appendix is a journal of the funeral exercises in Congress. Misprint mid-page, under dividing mark, on p.60 in date of current exercises [1865, for 1866]. Slight Wear at Corners and at Head and Tail of Spine. Else, Very Good. Monaghan, I 841. BAL 673D.
Price: $160.00

7994
Abbot, Edwin Hale.- A Review of the Report upon the Physics and Hydraulics of the Mississippi River; upon the Protection of the Alluvial Region against Overflow; and upon Deepening of the Mouths; Based upon Surveys and Investigations Made under Acts of Congress. Prepared by Capt. A. A. Humphreys and Lieut. H. L. Abbot, Corps of Topographical Engineers, United States Army. Reprinted from the North American Review, April, 1862. Boston. Crosby and Nichols. 1862. 42 pp. 4to. Green Printed Paper Wraps. First Edition. An extract from the North American Review, separately bound. A detailed summary of the history of the study by the Army Corps of Engineers of the Mississippi River, begun in 1850 and just published in its full form by Lippincott in 1861, with a summary and an evaluationof the findings and prescriptions of the Commission established by Congess. Data had been accumulated from the 18th and 19th century on the flood propensity and ecology of the river and this model study reported the data in useful form. Formulae were developed to help calculate estimates of hydraulic flow in the river and to treat the data quantitatively. The study refuted proposals of reservoirs to contain the floods of the Mississippi region and emphasized the utility of dikes and levees with practical means of calculating their necessary height and dimensions. Cost estimates are also provided. This landmark study, printed in an issue of only 1250 copies, provided a foundation of the new science of hydraulic and physical analysis applied to the flow of rivers. Very Good.
Price: $125.00

6208
Alexander, H. H. The Life of Guiteau and the Official History of the Most Exciting Case on Record: Being the Trial of Guiteau for Assassinating Pres. Garfield. Containing a Full Account of the Shooting of President Garfield, and All the Events from That Date until the Dastardly Wretch Was Brought to Trial; and Including a Full Account of All the Testimony of the Experts and Other Celebrated Witnesses; All the Speeches and Remarks Made by the Cunning Assasssin during His Trial for Life; His Great Efforts to Escape the Gallows by Feigning Insanity, Etc.; with All the Scenes and Incidents Attending This Very Interesting and Remarkable Trial. Philadelphia. National Publishing Company 1882 856 pp. Numerous Illustrations and Plates. 8vo. Decorated Green Publisher's Cloth. First Edition. Illustrated. The Author Was the Official Government Stenographer and Court Reporter during the Trial. He Exhorts Us That " the Best Is Always the Cheapest - Beware of Catchpenny Imitations." Covers Worn. Front Hinge Loose Internally. Loose Plate Early in Text.
Price: $65.00

6217
[Ames , Nathan] (pseud.): Señor Alguno. The Baby and the Bards. Childe Harvard, a Romance of Cambridge. by Señor Alguno. New Edition. And The Bards of Lind: to Wit, Longfellow, Bryant, Whittier, Petrcival, Sprague, Halleck, Lowell, Dana, Holmes and Willis. Collected and Adapted to the Music of the Spheres, with a Soothing Sonnet, and a Prelude, by the Same. Boston. Redding & Company. 1851. 186 pp. Paper Covered Boards with Paper Label. First Edition. An Epic Poem about Harvard by a Member of the Class of 1848.(dec. 1865) Paper-covered Boards with Paper Label on Spine. “The Bards of Lind” Consists of Ten Parodies of Longfellow and Others Written for “The Greeting to America” of the Singer Jenny Lind (William Cushing, “Initials and Pseudonyms”). Scarce. Hinges Cracked. Boards Stained. Sabin 12728. Cushing p.331.
Price: $235.00

6243
Anonymous.- Rules of Discipline of the Yearly Meeting of Men and Women Friends, Held in Philadelphia. Stereotyped for the Yearly Meeting. Philadelphia. The Representative Committee or Meeting for Sufferings. 1877. Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Title. First American Edition. Quaker Document. Provides Doctrinal Regulations for All Aspects of Human Behavior and Interaction. Bookplate of Andrew R. Moore from The Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia. Very Good.
Price: $95.00

6261
Anonymous (Author of “Evenings in Boston”).[? Alexander Blake].- Anecdotes of the American Indians, Illustrating Their Eccentricities of Character. New York. Alexander V. Blake. 1844. 252 pp. Illustrated with full-page frontispiece, vignette on title page and numerous wood engravings as tail pieces. 12mo. Brown publisher’s cloth, embossed in the blind. Gilt titling and decorations on spine. First Edition. Written by the Author of “Evenings in Boston” and “Ramon the Rover of Cuba.” [See Wright I, 2088] Not in Sabin. Not in Howes. AI 44-209. [See Wright I, 2088]. Inscribed in pencil on front free end paper: “E. L. Abbot from Aunt Hannah 1851”. A contemporary analysis of the Native American character as illustrated by anecdotes of the time. Nice woodcuts and on pp. 12 ff a long poem with references to Andrew Jackson. Wear at ends of spine with 1/2 cm. loss at ends of spine. Wear at all edges and corners. Soiled and mildly shaken.Else, Good-.
Price: $145.00

6312
Beecher, Edward, Shearman,Thos. G., and King, Horatio C. Proceedings of the Advisory Council of Congregational Churches and Ministers Called by the Plymouth Churchof Brooklyn,NY. (Brooklyn Council of 1876). New York. A. S. Barnes & Co. 1876. 370 pp. +28 pp. References Brown Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Title. First Edition. Meeting to Consider the Case of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. Beecher’s Farewell Address. Virtually Complete Transcript of the Church Trial of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, the Illustrious Pastor of Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, N.Y., Who Was Exposed to Be in an Adulterous Liaison with Mrs. Theodore Tilton, One of His Parishioners. This Was One of the 19th Century's Most Lurid and Public Scandals. the Rev. Beecher, Like His Sister, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Was an Ardent Abolitionist of Wide Influence and Favored Women's Suffrage. The Plymouth Church Still Stands, a National Historic Landmark, in Brooklyn Heights.
Price: $195.00

6354
Bradford, Alden.- History of Massachusetts from July,1775, When General Washington Took Command of the American Army, at Cambridge, to the Year 1789, (Inclusive,) When the Federal Government Was Established under the Present Constitution. Boston. Wells and Lilly. 1825. 376 pp. 4to. Half early brown morocco and brown cloth covered boards. 5 bands. Gilt lettering on spine. Blue end papers. First American Edition One of a Series of Volumes on the Consecutive History of Massachusetts from 1764 to 1820. This is Volume II in the series, following the author's 1822 record of Massachusetts events up to July 1775. There is a third volume published in 1829. This second volume is the record of Massachusetts in the Revolutionary period Minimal foxing. Wear to edges of spine and corners. A very good copy of this scarce item. Howes B698
Price: $175.00

6566
Dusenbery, B. M. (Compiler). Monument to the Memory of General Andrew Jackson: Containing Twenty-Five Eulogies and Sermons Delivered on the Occasion of His Death. To Which Is Added an Appendix, Containing General Jackson’s Proclamation, His Farewell Address, and A Certified Copy of His Last Will. The Whole Preceded by a Short Sketch of His Life. Philadelphia. Walker & Gillis. 1846 412 pp. Portrait Frontispiece. 6to. Publisher's Cloth. First Edition. Eulogies by Bancroft, Butler, et al. Biographical Sketch. Browned. Foxing. Ends of Spine Worn with Hinges Starting Externally. Wise & Cronin #255 ( Also Cites Another Edition, S. Hanna, Troy, as Publisher, 1846)
Price: $65.00

7934
Eddy, Mary Baker.- Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. Boston. Allison V. Stewart. 1910. 700 pp. Portrait of Author as Frontispiece. 8vo. Illustrated Black Cloth with Gilt Decoration. Marbled Edges. Top edge Gilt. Later Edition. Ex Libris. Was a Gift of the Christian Science Reading Room of Providence to the Providence Athenaeum. Copyright 1875. Wear at Corners and at Head and Tail of Spine. Marbling Faded on Edges. Howes, E42 (Earlier Editions), gives history of the book since 1875.
Price: $55.00

6608
Flannagan, Roy C.- The Story of Lucky Strike. N.P. Privately Published. 1938. First American Edition. Printed to Benefit the American Tobacco Company on the Occasion of Their Exhibit at the New York World’s Fair. Brown Wrappers Embossed in the Blind with the Trilon and Perisphere, New York World’s Fair, 1939.
Price: $65.00

6615
Ford (Editor), Paul Leicester.- Israel Mauduit’s Handbill: A Handbill Advocating American Independence Inspired by the English Ministry, and Written and Published at London in March, 1778. Brooklyn, NY. Historical Printing Club. 1890. Paper Covered Boards. First Edition as Such. Copy No.14 of 250 Printed. From: Winnowings in American History. Revolutionary Broadsides. No. I. The Bookplate of the Colonial Dames, NY. Front Hinge Cracked. Ex Libris.
Price: $125.00

6218
[Hinman, Royal R.] (pseudonym: An Antiquarian). - The Blue Laws of New Haven Colony, Usually Called Blue Laws of Connecticut; Quaker Laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts; Blue Laws of New York, Maryland, Virginia and South Carolina. First Record of Connecticut; Interesting Extracts from Connecticut Records; Cases of Salem Witchcraft; Charges and Banishment of Rev. Roger Williams, &c.; and Other Interesting and Instructive Antiquities. Hartford. Case, Tiffany & Co. 1838. 336 pp. 6to. Beautifully Blind Embossed Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Spine Title. First Edition. First Record of Connecticut; Interesting Extracts from Connecticut Records; Cases of Salem Witchcraft; Charges and Banishment of Rev. Roger Williams, etc. A Page of Errata Pasted onto Rear Pastedown.By Royal Ralph Hinman (1785-1868), an American biographer, Yale Graduate and Onetime Secretary of State for Connecticut (1835-1842). Minor Edge Wear on Spine. Foxing. Otherrwise, Very Good. Cushing, "Initials and Pseudonyms," pp.17, 457.
Price: $275.00

8636
Irving, Washington.- Life of George Washington. In Five Volumes. New York. G. P. Putnam. 1861. 454, 486, 483, 479, 434 pp. Portrait frontispiece engravings of Washington in each volume as well as illustrations of associated edifices and a portrait of Martha Washington. 12mo. Blue green publisher's cloth, embossed in the blind, with gilt titling on spine. T.e.g. Brown coated end papers. Second Edition. Irving's Life of Washington, originally projected to be in three volumes, was published ultimately in five, between 1855 and 1859. An edition limited to 110 copies was published with about 150 illustrations. Langfeld considers the trade edition to be the First Edition. This is a subsequent printing of the trade edition. Minor offsetting of frontispiece of Volume I. Mild wear to ends of spine. Else, a Very Good Copy. Signature of G. C. Benton in pencil on each front free fly leaf Williams & Edge, p.86 for 1860 edition. Langfeld & Blackburn, pp. 42–3, 88.
Price: $175.00

7797